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Full text of "Susquehanna Alumnus (1973-1976)"


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in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



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FALL 1973 



Susquehanna Alumnus 



Featuring the President's Report for 1972-73 




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Susquehanna University Rlumni association 



Directory of Officers 1973-74 



Harry W. Butts Jr. '48, 1311 Glenhardie Rd., Wayne, Pa. 19087 President 

George H. Bantley '41, 4998 Longview Dr., Murraysville, Pa. 15668 Vice President 

William C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 
Miss Dorothy Turner '36, Rear 68 Division St., Kingston. Pa. 18704 

Recording Secretary 
Chester G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Douglas E. Arthur '49, 4696 N. Galen Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17110 

Representative on University Board of Directors 
Henry J. Keil '39, 581 Nordhoff Dr., Leonia, N.J. 07605 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19067 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Simon B. Rhoads '30, 300 Susquehanna Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Alumni Representative to the University Athletic Committee 
Louis F. Santangelo '50, 111 Cocoa Ave., Hershey, Pa. 17033 

Alumni Representative to the University Athletic Committee 



LEWISTOWN 

Harry B. Thatcher, Esq. '41, South Hills, Lewistown, Pa. 17044 President 

Sherman E. Good '30, Railroad St., McClure, Pa. 17841 Vice President 

Ruth Goff Nicodemus '30 (Mrs. Bryce E.), 471 S. Main St., Lewistown, Pa. 17044 

Secretary -Treasurer 

MOUNT CARMEL-SHAMOKIN 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St.. Ml. Carmel, Pa. 17851 President 

Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. 17872 Vice President 

S. John Price '42, 1435 Arch St., Ashland, Pa. 17921 Secretary-Treasurer 

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51 (Mrs. William M.), Trailwood R.D. 1, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

18702 President 

Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St., Swoyersville, Pa. 18704 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36, Rear 68 Division St., Kingston, Pa. 18704 Secretary-Treasurer 



Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1974 
Gerald C. Herbster '58, 122 N. Maple Ave., Basking Ridge, N.J. 07920 
Janis Adams John '59 (Mrs. Lawrence L.), 1396 Bittersweet Lane, King Meodow 

Farms, West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Kenneth R. Kinney '40, 86 Halstead Ave., Apt. 2-C, Harrison, N.Y. 10528 
Frank A. Procopio '61, 1112 Old Eagle Rd., Lancaster, Pa. 17603 
Donald F. Wohlsen '50, Kenilworth Lane, Ambler, Pa. 19002 



NORTH NEW JERSEY 

Barry I.. Esq. x'64 and Miriam Brown Morkowitz '63, 9 Valley View Rd., 

Chester, N.J. 07930 Presideml 

Harold N. '54 and Jane Johnson, 80 Old Sterling Rd., Warren Twp., N.J. 07060 

Secretaryl 
Robert L. Hackenberg '56, 2019 Hilltop Rd., Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076 Treasurer! 



Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1975 
Xavier Abbott '38, 215 Oliver St., Swoyersville, Pa. 18704 
Jane Southwick Mathias '49 (Mrs. Roy P.), West Lawn, Fairmount Dr., Lewisburg, Pa. 

17837 
Peter M. Nunn '57, 8715 Liberty Lane, Potomac, Md. 20854 
Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68 (Mrs. Stephen M.), Skyline Apts., Apt. 102, Cressona, Pa. 

17929 
John Yanuklis '60. 38531 Tyson Lane, Fremont, Calif. 94536 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1976 

Samuel D. Clapper '68, 145 Plank Rd., Apt. 32, Somerset, Pa. 15501 
Signe S. Gates '71, 18401 Lost Knife Circle, #201, Gaithersburg, Md. 20760 
James J. Gormley '55, 8615 Alicia St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19115 
Lester C. Heilman Jr. '52, 244 Green Lane Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Franklin G. Smith '55, 1838 N. 21st St.. Allentown, Pa. 18104 



District Club Organizations 
To be elected 

To be elected 

CALIFORNIA 
Dr. Robert N. Troutmon '26, 434 W. 12th St.. Claremont, Calif. 91711 



ALTOONA 
BALTIMORE 



President 



CENTRE-UNION 

W. Alfred Streamer '26, 422 Kemmerer Rd., State College, Pa. 16801 President 

Dr. Andrew V. Kozak '32, 226 Corl St., State College, Pa. 17801 Vice President 

Lois Dauberman Schultz '48 (Mrs. Wm. C), 956 Tanney St., Bellefonte, Pa. 16823 

Secretary-Treasurer 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 

Carolyn I. Tritt '68, 1813 Alexander Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 President 

Paul Lucas '38. 1855 Scotland Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 Vice President 

Susan Zeichner Hopple '66 (Mrs. Herman K.), Route 8, Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 

Secretary 

HARRISBURG 

William C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 President 

Jack K. Bishop '54, 415 Lexington Court, Stafford Heights, Hershey, Pa. 17033 

Vice President 
James R. Clark '46, 424 Parkside Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 

Carol Ocker Kirk '65 (Mrs. Peter D.), 1511 Chatham Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

Secretary 
Catherine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs. Clayton K.). 571 Walnut Rd., Steelton, 

Pa. 17113 Treasurer 

JOHNSTOWN 

To be elected President 

John A. Topper '65, P.O. Box 554, Hyndman, Pa. 15545 Vice President 

Mary Lizzio Govekar '47 (Mrs. Max A.), P.O. Box 4, Elton, Pa. 15934 Secretary 

Thomas J. Weible '23, 324 Orchard St., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 Treasurer 

LANCASTER 
Richard E. '55 and Suzanne Seal McCarty x'57, 1810 Edenwald La., Lancaster, Pa. 

17603 Chairman 

LEHIGH VALLEY 

Frank W. Harris '70, 330 N. 16th St., Allentown, Pa. 18102 President 

The Rev. Gilbert C. '61 and Lynn Hassinger Askew '57, 1936 Pennsylvania St.. 

Allentown, Pa. 18104 Vice President 

Mary Moore Schotkowski (Mrs. Edwin) '58, 3044 Hecktown Rd.. Bethlehem, Pa. 

18017 Secretary-Treasurer 



PHILADELPHIA 

Kenneth R. Fish '63, 306 Ivy Rock Lane, Havertown, Pa. 19083 President 

James J. Gormley '55, 8615 Alicia St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19115 Vice President 

Marvel Cowling Robinson '53 (Mrs. Franklin E.), 309 Woodridge La., Media, Pa. 

19063 Corresponding Secretary 1 

Shirley A. Young '51, Fountainville, Pa. 18923 Recording Secretary 

Louise E. West '39, Seven Oaks East, Apt. 627, 302 E. Marshall St., West Chester, 

Pa. 19380 Treasurer 

Donald F. Wohlsen '50, Kenilworth Lane, Ambler, Pa. 19002 Director 

James B. Norton III '64, Box 7, Mt. Airy Rd., Coatesville, Pa. 19320 Director 



PITTSBURGH 

Thomas G. P. Roberts '68, 1735 Fairmont Ave., Arnold, Pa. 15068 



President! 



READING 

W. Frank Laudenslayer '39, R.D. 3, Boyerrown, Pa. 19512 Vice President! 

Dr. Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. '49, 3051 Van Reed Rd., Sinking Spring, Pa. 19608 



William S. Whiteley '35, 1910 N. 15th St., Reading, Pa. 19604 
Richard Cahn '58, 464 Hill Rd., Wernersville, Pa. 19565 



Vice Presidentl 
Secretary! 
Treasurer! 



SOUTH JERSEY 

Douglas E. Spotts '63, 1305 Columbia Ave., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 President 

Richard J. Biedermann '64, 39 Broad St., Woodstown, N.J. 08098 1st Vice President 
Joseph R. Joyce '63. 30 Harrow Gate, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08003 2nd Vice President 

Carol Simon May x'70 (Mrs. Bruce M.), 712 Old Broadway, Apt. C-2, Westville, 

N.J. 08093 Secretary 

David J. Schumacher '64, 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 Treasurer 

Charlotte Sondt Erdley '56 (Mrs. Kenneth F. Jr.), 302 Lenape Tr., Wenonah, N.J. 

08090 Executive Board 

Barbara Claffee Schumacher '63 (Mrs. David J.), 3103 Sheffield Dr., 

Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 Executive Board 

Leslie Butler '62, 752 Cotswold Rd., Somerdale, N.J. 08083 Executive Board 

SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 
Arthur F. Bowen '62. 217 E. Walnut St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 President 

Barbara Brown Troutman '67 (Mrs. David R), 410 N. 9th St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 

17870 Vice President 

Joseph W. Kleinbauer '63, R.D. 1, Monroe Manor, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Secretary 
James C. Black '63, R.D. 1, Box 494, Fairway Dr., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

WASHINGTON 

Peter M. Nunn '57, 8715 Liberty La.. Potomac, Md. 20854 President 

Louis R. Coons '61, 10300 Darby St., Fairfax, Va. 22030 Vice President 

R. Brent Swope '65, 11711 Castlewood Ct., Potomac, Md. 20854 Vice President 

Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69 (Mrs. Wm. G-), 1705 Hampshire Green La., 

Silver Spring, Md. 20903 Secretary-Treasurer 

WILLIAMSPORT 

Donald S. King '66, 604 Montour St.. Montoursville, Pa. 17754 President 

Ruth Wheeland Wentz '38 (Mrs. Fillmore H.), 1517 Warren Ave., Williamsport. Pa. 
17701 Secretary-Treasurer 



YORK-HANOVER 
Jerry E. Egger '65. 2432 Eastwood Dr., York, Pa. 17402 
Jean Rowe Lauver '54 (Mrs. Orville H.). 2040 E. Market St., York, Pa. 
17402 

WEST CHESTER COUNTY -SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT 

Janet Leitzel Fairchild '32 (Mrs. Lee M.), Old Croton lake Rd., Box 429, 
Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 10549 



President 
Secretory 



On our cover: President Weber in his 
office on the second floor of Selinsgrove 
Hall. Susquehanna's President submits 
an annual Report each fall, and five 
years ago we began making them a part 
of the Alumnus so that alumni and 
parents could share in the University's 
progress and plans. This is Dr. Weber's 
15th Report since coming to Susquehan- 
na. It is must reading. 

In a related vein, Larry Isaacs '43 has 
prepared a thoughtful piece on "Finan- 
cial Problems in Higher Education." We 
believe our readers will find this article 
interesting and informative — and that, 
taken together, the two features provide 
a lot of understanding about the subject 
dear to most of our hearts. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 43 



FALL 1973 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 



Report of the President 1972-73 



Fifteen Years — A Tribute 



Financial Problems in Higher Education 
by Lawrence M. Isaacs '43 



23 



24 



Many Honored at Opening Convocation 



27 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E. BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F. ERNST 



Susquehannans On Parade 28 



Advanced Degrees 30 



"I Do" 



31 



Susquehanna Universit] 
Alumni Association 



Born Crusaders 



33 



Winter Sports Schedules 33 



Harry W. Butts '48, president; George H. Bantley 
'41, William C. Davenport '53, vice presidents; 
Dorothy Turner '36, secretary; Chester G. Rowe 
'52, treasurer; Douglas E. Arthur '49, Henry J. 
Keil '39, Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, representa- 
tives on the University Board of Directors; Simon 
B. Rhoads '30, Louis F. Santangelo '50, repre- 
sentatives on the University Athletic Committee. 



Deaths 



34 



Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 
1974: Gerald C Herbster '58, Janis Adams John 
'59, Kenneth R. Kinney '40, Frank A. Procopio 
'61. Donald F. Wohlsen '50. Term expiring 1975; 
Xavier Abbott '35, Jane Southwick Mathias '49, 
Peter M. Nunn '57, Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68, 
John P. Yanuklis '60. Term expiring 1976: Samuel 
D. Clapper '68, Signe S. Gates '71, James 
Gormley '55, Lester C. Heilman '52, Franklin G. 
Smith '55. 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Pub- 
lished four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



FALL 1973 



REPORT OF THE 
1972-73 




INTRODUCTION 



In February of 1974 I will conclude my fifteenth year 
as President of Susquehanna University. The evolution 
of the University during this period has been predicated 
by the enormous changes which have confronted higher 
education. From a rather sparse office in Selinsgrove 
Hall and with an administrative and teaching staff of 
under 50, an operating budget of $500,000 and a stu- 
dent body of less than 500, one could look out over the 
campus in 1959 and somewhat apprehensively conclude 
that, unlike the tenor of the 1950s, growth would be the 
callword for Susquehanna during the 1960s. Unsettling 
was the notion of what growth might do to the 
University, an institution whose character reflected an 
intimateness where compactness and limited size af- 
forded worthy assets. 

Recognizing the need to adapt facilities and pro- 
grams during the post-sputnik era to the growing educa- 
tional demands of the country, the University embarked 
on an ambitious but controlled expansion program 
which, we hoped, would provide modern educational 
opportunities for a growing number of students without 
dissipating the qualities so cherished during the era of 
President Smith. 

Looking out my office window today I can't help 
but reflect that the decision to expand was the only 
viable alternative available to the University. Fortunate- 
ly, succeeding events — coupled with the dedication 
and hard work of countless faculty and staff — helped 
confirm the wisdom of this decision. The Susquehanna 



of today is an educational institution attuned to the 
times and in step with the contemporary needs of young 
people. Our enrollment of 1400, the faculty and staff of 
150, and an operating budget of almost $5 million in- 
dicate both evidence of growth and maturity as well as 
Susquehanna's desire to provide a challenging academic 
climate within which learning can take place. 

One is now tempted to look out the window 
beyond the campus to the hills to the west of the 
University and prophesize what next should be done to 
ensure educational relevance for Susquehanna during 
the 1970s. Fortunately, our planning processes are now 
more sophisticated and the wisdom engendered by the 
maturity of the University during the decade just past 
provides us with a vision of our future direction. 

This report will speak, in part, to the events of this 
past year. More importantly, perhaps, the reports hope 
to provide the reader with some modest insight into 
plans for the future. Change, though a certainty in 
today's society, can be uncontrolled and unsettling, but 
with proper planning and with a clear-cut set of ob- 
jectives, a University can program its advancement in 
such a way as to be systematically compatible with its 
aims and objectives and, most importantly, with the 
educational needs of its students. 




Q Q* 



Gustave W. Weber 
President 



September 1973 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




A BROADER 
PERSPECTIVE 



We are oftentimes only aware of the obvious that 
takes place on a college campus — the presence of 100 
faculty members in whose trust the students place the 
direction of their learning experience, and an ad- 
ministration whose duties include the implementation of 
broad policy guidelines. Behind this vibrant growth and 
development, however, is a group of men and women 
from all walks of life responsible for the wellbeing of 
the University. Active participation by the Board of 
Directors in the affairs of Susquehanna has greatly 
enhanced the development of the college over the past 
15 years. 

Some members of this governing body spend as 
much as 10 to 15 hours each week on University 
business as we draw on their particular expertise to ef- 
fect a smooth and orderly pattern of institutional 
management. Finance, engineering and fund-raising 
talents of Board members serve to strengthen the 
management of Susquehanna, particularly during these 



unsettling times when financial limitations have dictated 
a reordering of priorities and the application of business 
acumen. 

The composition of the Board in recent years has 
evolved into an active group of 40 persons representing 
business, the law, medicine, education and the Church. 
Such variety of backgrounds and personal and pro- 
fessional accomplishment uniquely equip the University 
to face the challenges of the 1970s with assurance. 
Operating under a "committee action plan," the Board 
consists of standing committees answering to an Ex- 
ecutive Committee. Certain groups such as the Finance 
and Buildings and Grounds committees meet monthly 
to conduct pressing business and to manage the $5 
million budget. During the past several years, difficult 
ones for higher education, the responsiveness of these 
groups has been directly responsible for our ability to 
operate within a balanced budget and to remain fiscally 
strong. Other committees such as Development, 
Academic Affairs, Religious Interests, Honorary De- 
grees, and Alumni Relations meet less frequently but 
remain actively in touch with University affairs. Most 
committees have faculty and student representation to 
ensure communication and to facilitate the decision- 
making process. 

Recognizing the changing nature of the educa- 
tional experience, the Board has just spent three years 
rewriting the University's constitution. Implicit in the 
study were the results of long-range planning reports, 
contemplated curriculum revisions and projected pat- 
terns of educational and auxiliary services evolving on 
the campus. Within this revised constitution are changes 



FALL 1973 




At one of last season's Board meetings, the candid camera caught these 

members wrestling with Susquehanna business, left to right and top 

to bottom Chairman John C. Horn of Alexandria. Pa.; John B. Apple and 

Joseph L. Ray of Sunbury; Dr. Walter B. Freed, Rochester, N.Y.; Robert C. 

Goetze, Baltimore; Ralph Witmer '15, Selinsgrove; Dr. Leonard F. Bush, 

Danville, Pa.; W . Donald Fisher '51 , Selinsgrove; Dr. A. Roger Gobbel, 




which reflect the work of the total University in pro- 
viding an enabling document for future progress. The 
revised constitution provides a flexible framework 
within which the University can develop and recognizes 
the responsibility 1 ) of the Board to provide for the con- 
tinued health of the institution; 2) of the administration 
to organize and supervise the orderly operation of all 
the activities and services of the institution; 3) of the 
faculty to provide excellence in teaching and also to in- 
spire; and 4) of the students to take full advantage of 
these opportunities and to participate in the orderly pro- 
cess of change which will be required if the Sus- 
quehanna community is to meet the challenges and 
responsibilities of the future. 

The several basic philosophical changes in the con- 
stitution should be of interest to alumni and friends, 
since they give evidence of a broadened view of edu- 
cation as envisioned by the Board. Such changes are: 

1. To affirm the purposes and objectives of the 
University in light of today's concern about the struc- 
ture and purpose of higher education. 

2. To broaden the role of the University in such a 
way as to recognize the need to transcend the "ivory 
tower" by providing expanded educational op- 
portunities. It is recognized not only that there is 
nothing sacred about four years as a normal term for 
the undergraduate experience, but that it need not be 
demeaning for the liberal arts college to offer con- 
tinuing education and associate degree programs for the 
local region. 

3. By the same token, recognition is given to the 
need to expand off-campus learning experiences and to 
endorse innovative and cooperative educational con- 
cepts. 



4. Recognizing the changing nature of the 
University and its governance procedures and the need 
to involve all elements of the campus in the decision- 
making process, the revised constitution increases the 
representation of faculty and students on the various 
Board committees. In addition, the number of alumni 
representatives on the Board of Directors is increased to 
five. 

These changes, I believe, are important in that they 
speak to a new and emerging philosophy which 
broadens Susquehanna's educational responsibility. All 
alumni and friends should understand that the Universi- 
ty recognizes this expanded responsibility both to itself 
and to society and will move forward to meet this com- 
mitment. 



ADMISSIONS 



As of July 1, 1973, the Admissions Office had pro- 
cessed 1331 completed applications for the fall of 1973. 
We anticipate that 420 students will accept our offer of 
admission, thereby assuring a total University enroll- 
ment of 1400 again this fall. 

Of significance is the fact that the total number of 
applications for the fall is down slightly from previous 
years, perhaps reflecting several important changes in 
student attitudes. First, the discontinuation of the draft 
has relieved many students of the pressure to gain im- 
mediate admission to college in order to avoid possible 
induction into military service. As a result, guidance 



Gettysburg; Henry J. Keil '39, Leonia, N.J.; C. Thomas Aikens II, State 
College, Pa.; Dr. Roger M. Blough '25, New York City; Mrs. Kimball D. 
Miller, Williamsport, Pa. with Mary L. Furman '74, Sayre, Pa. Student 
and faculty representatives have participated for several years. 





counselors inform us that, in some cases, as many as 
10-15 percent fewer of their students are seeking im- 
mediate admission to college. Some are taking more 
time to formulate career plans and utilize an interim 
period between high school and post-secondary study 
for work or travel. This trend, of itself, may be a 
positive one in that a more mature student equipped 
with a better knowledge of career objectives will be 
making application to Susquehanna. Second, we find a 
definite decrease in the number of applicants enrolled in 
liberal arts. For the coming fall. Liberal Arts deposits 
decreased by 18 percent, while those in Business and 
Music rose 38 percent and 51 percent respectively. 
While trends are not yet evident, we assume that the 
tight job market for liberal arts majors coupled with 
more competitive graduate school admission prompts 
many students to consider more traditional forms of 
career education. Susquehanna continues to be 
cognizant of the need to structure its educational pro- 
gram on a liberal arts foundation but, at the same time, 
we must be aware of the need to equip students more 
specifically for today's job market. 

As a part of the University's self-study in prepara- 
tion for the evaluation next winter by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, it has 
been determined that the academic level of students 
enrolling at Susquehanna has remained basically the 
same over the past six years. Seventy percent of the 
entering men rank in the upper 40 percent of their 
secondary school classes while 92 percent of the women 
come to us from the upper two-fifths of their class. In 
addition, 82 percent of the women and 72 percent of 
the men choose Susquehanna as a result of a belief that 
our social and cultural atmosphere is more compatible 
with their own interests than the other schools to which 
they applied. A significant change has taken place over 
the past decade in the geographic composition of the 
student body. During this period, the enrollment of 
Pennsylvania students has declined from 70 to 54 per- 
cent and the number from both New Jersey and New 
York has increased markedly. 

Encouraging to us is that Susquehanna's fee 
schedule has been at least partially successful in keeping 
a private education within the reach of most families. 
An analysis of parental income currently shows that for 
the entering class, about 5 percent of the parents earned 
less than $6,000; 1 1 percent earned between $6,000 and 
$10,000; 24 percent earned $10,000 to $15,000; 31 per- 
cent earned $15,000 to $25,000; 18 percent earned 
$25,000 to $35,000, and 1 1 percent earned $35,000 and 
above. By keeping costs moderate and utilizing all 
financial aid resources at our disposal, Susquehanna 
was able to allocate aid amounting to over $332,000 for 
the members of the Class of 1973 who graduated in 
June. 



It is evident that we are in the initial stages of yet 
another change on the college campus. The activism of 
the late 1960s and early 1970s has given way to a new 
type of student quest for identity centered around 
personal fulfillment that tends to shun collective ac- 
tivism. A "return to the books" has been reported on 
campuses throughout the country as more students 
again seem seriously intent on pursuing their academic 
interests. In Susquehanna's case, we note with a 
particular pride that students seem more preoccupied 
with academics than at any time in recent years. In part 
this may be attributed to the new 3-3 curriculum which 
compacts work into three terms of ten weeks each and 
leaves less time for non-academic pursuits. An ad- 
ditional factor appears to be the supply and demand 
situation in the marketplace and the competitive nature 
of the job market. We note that during the past two 
years fewer firms have recruited on the Susquehanna 
campus, thereby reflecting the generally tight market — 
particularly for the liberal arts majors and those prepar- 
ing to teach. This leads to a third identifying charac- 
teristic of today's student, which seems to be a desire 
for increased vocational training to ensure employability 
following graduation. I referred to this matter of voca- 
tional and career preparation in my report last year, but 
it is important to add that this trend now seems to be 
established and our obligation becomes that of pro- 
viding more opportunities for career preparation. The 
flexibility of the 3-3 program provides students with this 
type of opportunity. The liberal arts major, for example, 
has opportunities to take coursework in computer 
science, accounting, business or statistics, thus enhan- 
cing his chances for gainful employment while still 
pursuing his or her major field of academic interest. 

Another point of change on the campus refers to 
the need of many students for a new and different 
dimension to the four-year undergraduate education. 
The off-campus learning experience has gained in- 
creasing favor and we project that within the next five 
years over 10 percent of the student body will spend 
some portion of their college life in off-campus study. 
While less vocal about it than yesterday's student, 
today's student is still very much interested in social 
justice, a world of peace, a tolerable environment, and 
improving the destiny of the poor. Some have rightfully 
questioned whether the conventional educational pro- 
cess at the undergraduate level prepares a student to 
meet such problems head-on. As Louis T. Benezet, 
President of the State University of New York at 
Albany, has said. "The colleges have traditionally told 
students to learn what those students before you have 
learned: knowledge of man's history, his thought, and 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



his creations; and knowledge of the make-up of the 
natural universe. Today's students reply, 'That's all right 
for professional scholars. It's not all right for those who 
want to do something about society as matters are going 
now.' " 

Students tend to become critical of those courses 
which lack relevance, those in which the teacher fails to 
denote a relationship of the subject matter to the world 
today. It is our belief that historical perspective is just as 
important as ever, but the scholar of today must be alert 
to the need to satisfy this insatiable curiosity of stu- 
dents who demand an understanding of contemporary 
problems. 

This whole matter of relevance, though sometimes 
worn and frayed around the edges, is most applicable 
now and has led to a new and vibrant dimension in 
undergraduate education. A greater number of students 
spend a full term or a part of a term in an off-campus 
experience often related to career objectives. The 
Washington and United Nation semesters provide those 
students interested in government with the opportunity 
to spend a term in either Washington, D.C. or New 
York examining the functioning of government, while 
psychology and sociology majors may spend time away 
from campus serving as interns at the Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital or with a social agency. The 
formalizing of the internship as an academic experience 
provides an extension of the educational process which 
allows the student to gain practical, on-the-job ex- 
perience that reinforces classroom learning and better 
prepares him for future employment. During the past 
year about 60 students served internships, and we 
predict that this interest will grow as the programs 
become more formalized within the various academic 
departments. Faculty members are becoming more 
sensitive to this need for off-campus learning as an in- 
tegral part of the learning experience. For years Sus- 
quehanna has conducted internships in accounting and 
student teaching and today's expanded program merely 
recognizes the worth of such pursuits to the total educa- 
tional mission of the University. 

Such changes in student needs have led to a change 
in emphasis for the Student Personnel Office which, for 
many years, was primarily interested in enforcing cam- 
pus rules and regulations pertaining to social conduct. 
More recently, the college campus has seen a relaxation 
of parietals as more and more responsibility has been 
placed on the individual student who must now accept 
responsibility for his own actions. The maturity of 
today's college student would seem to speak well for his 
ability to accept this new freedom and to adjust his 
social and living habits to conform with the objectives 
of the college community as a whole. Emphasis by the 
Dean of Students on career guidance and individual 
counseling have replaced the traditional "enforcement" 



ADMISSIONS PROFILE 




Number of Applications 


Received (As of July 1). 




Year 


Number 






1967-68 


979 






1968-69 


1401 






1969-70 


1470 






1970-71 


1440 






1971-72 


1451 






1972-73 


1331 






Geographical Distribution of Entering 


Class 




State 


1953-54 


1962-63 


1972-73 


Pennsylvania 


85% 


70% 


54% 


New Jersey 


8% 


17% 


27% 


New York 


4% 


6% 


10% 


Maryland 


1% 


2% 


3% 


Connecticut 


— 


1% 


3% 


Other 


2% 


4% 


3% 















100% 


100% 


100% 


Religious Preference of 


Student Body 






Religion 


1962-63 


1 972-73 




Lutheran 


38% 


25% 




Presbyterian 


13% 


14% 




Methodist 


10% 


10% 




Roman Catholic 


7% 


13% 




None 


1% 


9% 




Other 


31% 


29% 




Percentage of Students from Upper 






Two-fifths of Secondary 


School Class 






Rank 


1963-64 


1968-69 


1972-73 


Upper l/5th 


41% 


54% 


53% 


Upper 2/5ths 


70% 


82% 


87% 



or in loco parentis role of this office. As a result, this 
new direction in guidance and counseling tends to rein- 
force the emerging University-wide concept of designing 
individual educational programs and off-campus ex- 
periences for students in recognition of individual career 
goals and objectives. 



FALL 1973 



* 



FACULTY 



Much is said about the increasing educational 
responsibility placed upon any institution of higher 
education. Referring again to the University's revised 
constitution, a philosophy for change is underscored in 
the preamble: 

The Susquehanna community recognizes that im- 
perfect men join in various ways to make an 
imperfect society, but that within the Susquehanna 
community rests the ideal that imperfect men can 
cooperate to build a structure or system which is 
more perfect than the sum of its parts. Presenting 
a zeal for excellence, under the guidance of the 
Christian ethic, the Susquehanna community's pur- 
pose is to provide a life experience which will 
include training in specific knowledge and skills, 
the development of independent learning abilities, 
and the participation in an active and viable com- 
munity which in itself is responding constructively 
to change. 

The focus, then, is that the University recognizes 
the need for continuity and change. We must un- 
derstand that these two forces will direct the destiny of 
Susquehanna in the future and, in fact, much of what 
has happened in recent months is a direct result of this 
awareness. Clark Kerr, chairman of the Carnegie Com- 
mission on Higher Education, succinctly states the im- 
pact of change: 

The students are changing in several ways. The 
major over-all change is the new interest of many 
students in the academic environment. No longer 
is it taken for granted as the sole preserve of the 
faculty and administration. . . . 
Attention will now turn to equality of opportunity 
to enter life; to an exploration of ways of improv- 
ing the many avenues to work and life, and not 
just higher education alone. This means that higher 
education will become more a part of a larger 
universe, rather than being a universe unto itself. 

We see this trend in Selinsgrove and much of our 
effort during the coming months will be geared toward 
planning for an expanded role. The Board of Directors 
has indicated its alertness by providing the University 
with increased flexibility to transcend the "ivory tower" 
and to provide expanded educational opportunities for 
its fulltime students and for the community. As far back 
as 1970 an apparent need of the region was recognized 
as Susquehanna established an Adult Education and 
Evening Program. This program was started out of con- 
cern for an increased awareness and desire for higher 
education by the general public and the more demand- 
ing educational requirements for advancement in all 
areas of life. Both credit and non-credit courses are of- 
fered within the traditional framework and the program 
is now also introducing specialized work in independent 
study. Over 200 residents of the local region are enroll- 
ed in some 23 courses and of particular appeal has been 
a Certificate Program in Management awarded to 
participants who complete four basic courses in 



<& 




economics, management, human relations, and ac- 
counting. 

A Report of the Commission on Non-Traditional 
Study recently reported that the nation's adults want a 
"different kind of education and a lot more of it than 
most colleges and universities provide." The Com- 
mission recommends a substantial broadening of op- 
portunities in basic, continuing and recurrent education 
for adults 18 to 60 years of age. In an effort to further 
expand the offerings of the University and as a means 
of recognizing additional responsibility in the area of 
continuing education, the University will start an 
associate degree program this fall. 

As the educational needs of a growing region 
change, Susquehanna sees the need for a two-year 
academic program which meets the individual growth 
and career objective of the student and provides an 
educational program compatible with the needs of those 
otherwise qualified students who, for whatever reason, 
find matriculation at a four-year college impossible. By 
the same token, the associate degree program provides a 
patterned and extended opportunity to pursue educa- 
tional goals and objectives over a period of time and in 
such a manner so as not to conflict with family or oc- 
cupational obligations. Known as PACE (Program in 
Adult Continuing Education) the associate degree 
may be considered as a terminal degree or, op- 
tionally, the student may use it as a base for con- 
tinuation at the bachelor's level. Evening students. 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



enrolling in from one to three courses per term, can 
complete the requirements for the Associate in Arts or 
the Associate in Applied Science (Business Ad- 
ministration) degree in three to five years. The program 
will incorporate several recent educational innovations 
including open admissions, independent study, and the 
granting of credit for "life experiences." Amplifying this 
latter point, life experience credit may be granted by the 
University following an evaluation of an applicant's 
skills acquired on the job or as a result of education ac- 
quired individually and independent of formalized in- 
struction. 

While recognition is given here to these new and 
emerging forms of educational service provided by Sus- 
quehanna, it is important to note that these sup- 
plementary activities in no way detract from the 
primary purpose of the University — that of providing 
a sound undergraduate educational experience for our 
1400 undergraduates. During the past 15 months much 
effort has been directed toward completing a self-study 
for the approaching Middle States evaluation and in 
further implementing the new 3-3 curriculum. As I have 
indicated earlier, enrollment has now reached a stable 
level of 1400 and a faculty-student ratio of 1:14 has 
been achieved. The Middle States self-study has in- 
dicated that the demands on individual faculty members 
have increased both as a result of the intensified 
academic schedule and the growth of independent study 
projects, practicums and off-campus experiences. The 
members of the faculty are to be commended for their 
efforts on behalf of the Middle States evaluation and for 
their continued service to Susquehanna. The growing 
academic reputation of the University speaks well for 
the quality of our teaching staff. 

Just as the role of the University has broadened 
over the past several years so, too, has the degree to 
which the members of the faculty have become involved 
in professional and educationally-related activities. 
While an all inclusive list is impossible to compile, I 
would like to make note of the following: 

Professors Richard A. Reiland and Raymond G. 
Laverdiere of the Accounting Department were actively 
involved in the regional and local meetings of the In- 
stitute of Certified Public Accountants. All four 
members of the Chemistry Department participated in 
the various activities of the American Chemical Society. 
Three members of the Biology Department attended the 
sessions of the Pennsylvania Academy of Sciences with 
similar participation by the History Department in their 
professional meetings. We estimate that University 
faculty members attended more than 80 professional 
meetings during the past year. Dr. Donald D. Housley, 
assistant professor of history, has done extensive 
research on Snyder County during the Great Depression 
and his findings have been presented to both the Snyder 
County Historical Society and a regional history con- 
ference held at the Bloomsburg State College. Dr. John 
H. Longaker, associate professor of history, served as 



commentator at this latter conference. Dr. Marian E. 
McKechnie, associate professor of history, spent the 
summer of 1972 in Latin America. 

Dr. James R. Misanin, associate professor of 
psychology, was a visiting professor at Bucknell 
University where he taught a graduate course in Learn- 
ing Theory and also served as editorial consultant and 
referee for Science and Physiology and Behavior. Dr. 
Charles E. Lyle, associate professor of psychology, and 
Boyd Gibson, assistant professor of religion, were in- 
strumental in developing the Baltimore Urban Program 
under which Susquehanna students can serve an intern- 
ship in the inner city of Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. 
Robert M. Bastress, associate professor of education, 
served as an evaluator for an experimental project on 
teacher inservice training programs sponsored by the 
Central Pennsylvania Intermediate Unit. Dr. Charles J. 
Igoe, associate professor of education, again was named 
as a consultant to the federal government on the Na- 
tional Student Volunteer and Action Training Programs, 
and chaired the Central Region Advisory Committee 
which is preparing a study of existing day care centers 
for the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare. 

Dr. Robert L. Bradford, associate professor of 
political science, once again directed the 1973 Sus- 
quehanna at Oxford Program with 24 students from 
Susquehanna and other institutions participating. The 
Modern Languages Department began a cooperative 
venture with Bucknell University in sponsoring a col- 
loquium on Hamlet. Dr. Nancy A. Cairns and Dr. Peter 
B. Waldeck made presentations at these sessions while 
Dr. Charles A. Rahter, professor of English, served as 
moderator for several of the sessions. Dr. Marjorie W. 
McCune, associate professor of English, is editing 
Abstracts for 17 th Century News to be published this 
summer by Penn State University. 

James B. Steffy, associate professor of music, and 
Cyril M. Stretansky, assistant professor, conducted band 
and choral festivals respectively in Pennsylvania, 
Delaware and Connecticut. Mr. Steffy was also musical 
director of the 1973 Mexican International Festival of 
Music. This past summer he also served as chief ad- 
judicator for the Anglo-International Music Festival in 
Coventry, England. John P. Magnus, associate professor 
of music, gave voice recitals in Antwerp, Belgium and 
Graz, Austria. 

In addition to the active participation of all faculty 
in the Middle States evaluation and their involvement in 
adjusting to the new curriculum, several faculty papers 
were either published or presented. They include: 

Leonard Simons, instructor in biology, presented a 
paper to the National Association for Research in 
Science Teaching entitled "The Effectiveness of Written 
Scripts vs. Audio Tapes in Teaching College Biology." 
Dr. Wallace J. Growney, associate professor of 
mathematical sciences, and Dr. Fred A. Grosse, pro- 
fessor of physics, co-authored a paper on "Remote 
Batch Computing at a Small College" and presented it at 



FALL 1973 



11 



the Eastern Computer Machinery Meeting in Toronto, 
Canada. In addition, Dr. Growney presented two papers 
at Bloomsburg State College on "Solutions to a Shortest 
Path Problem" and "An Overview of Operations 
Research." 

Dr. Frederick D. Ullman, assistant professor of 
mathematical sciences, co-authored a paper accepted by 
the Journal of Linear Algebra, entitled "A Modified 
ADI Method for Computing the 'Best Least Squares 
Solution' of an Incompatible System (AXI-)-IXB)x=g." 
Dr. Richard H. Lowright's paper, "An Analysis of Fac- 
tors Controlling Deviations in Hydraulic Equivalence in 
Some Modern Sands," was published in the Journal of 
Sedimentary Petrology, and a second paper entitled 
"Environmental Determination Using Hydraulic 
Equivalence Studies" has been accepted for publication 
by the same journal. Dr. Frank W. Fletcher, professor 
of geology, co-authored a paper published in the 
Geology Society of America Bulletin entitled 
"Paleography and Paleoclimatology in the Late Devon- 
ian of North America." 

Dr. Misanin and his students continued to produce 
significant publications appearing in such journals as 
Physiological Psychology, Physiology and Behavior, 
Developmental Psychobiology, Journal of Comparative 
and Physiological Psychology. Ronald L. Dotterer, in- 
structor in English, has articles accepted for publication 
in the Journal for Irish Literature. Finally, two articles 
by Susquehanna faculty members — Dr. Wilhelm Reun- 
ing, vice president and dean, and Dr. William A. Russ 
Jr., professor emeritus of history, appeared in the 1973 
edition of Susquehanna University Studies. 

As a special incentive to members of the faculty to 
pursue their professional interests, the University again 
last summer awarded four Susquehanna University 
Summer Faculty Research Grants in amounts up to 
$1000. Recipients this year were: Dr. Igoe, Dr. Lucia S. 



Kegler, assistant professor of modern languages, Dr. 
Lowright, Dr. Neil H. Potter, associate professor of 
chemistry, and G. Edward Schweikert, assistant pro- 
fessor of psychology. 

Grants for special projects by faculty members 
received during the year included: $20,000 to Dr. 
Fletcher from the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare for a project entitled "Ecological Perspective in 
Decision-Making: A Plan for Action;" $10,000 to Dr. 
Otto Reimherr, professor of philosophy and religion, to 
establish an Institute for Studies in Parish Ministry from 
the Aid Associations for Lutherans; $6000 from the 
Lutheran Church in America to Dr. Kenneth O. Flad- 
mark, professor of business administration and director 
of the Evening Program, to develop curriculum content 
for the associate degree program; and $15,000 to 
William J. Seaton, instructor in sociology, to conduct a 
drug and alcohol information program in Snyder and 
surrounding counties. 

Frederick R. Sauter, instructor in business ad- 
ministration; James M. Handlan, assistant professor of 
mathematical sciences; and James A. Blessing, assistant 
professor of political science, have been granted sab- 
batical leaves for the 1973-74 year. All will use the op- 
portunity to either complete their dissertations or their 
coursework for the doctoral degree. In addition. Dr. 
Reimherr has been granted sabbatical leave for Term III 
and Dr. Thomas F. McGrath, professor of chemistry, 
has been extended a leave of absence to conduct 
research related to the University's Institute For En- 
vironmental Studies. 

Four members of the faculty received promotions 
during the year to become effective in September of 
1973. Dr. Fletcher, and Dr. Lawrence A. Abler of the 
English Department were promoted to full professor 
while Charles S. Kunes, instructor in physical education, 
and Mr. Sauter have been elevated to assistant 
professors. 




SCHEDULE OF CURRENT INCOME 




1963-64 1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72 1972-73 1973-74 



development 
/finances 



Recognition has been given to the role of planning at 
Susquehanna and to the need to involve all elements of 
the campus in the planning process. In this manner we 
are able to effect a better understanding by all con- 
cerned of our aims and objectives in relation to resource 
allocation. The financial stringencies of the past several 
years were imposed with the full cooperation of faculty 
and staff primarily as a result of total University in- 
volvement in the decision-making process. We believe, 
however, that Susquehanna's willingness to tighten its 
belt and operate within the framework of a balanced 
budget in no way diluted the educational program. In 
talking with many college presidents who have gone 
through the same agony in recent years, I found that not 
one has provided solid evidence that cost-cutting at his 
institution has severely hurt the academic program. This 
may lead one to conclude that there was excess in most 
budgets which could be reduced or eliminated without 
severe repercussions. On the other hand, such action 
may be taken as a sign of growing sophistication in 
management and planning at the various institutions. 
My reaction is that both are correct, but that the latter 



will carry over and greatly assist us over the long run as 
we plan for the future. 

Current financial pressures do, however, pose a 
serious long-range problem. With institutions attempting 
to keep costs within bounds to students — often at a 
rate below the general level of inflation — we run the 
risk of soon reaching that point where cost con- 
sciousness could begin to impair the quality of the in- 
structional program. Perhaps a college can place too 
much emphasis on efficiency and reach a point where 
the relationship of teacher to student is jeopardized by 
frugality. Sol M. Linowitz, former chairman of Xerox 
and a trustee of Cornell, has said this: "To a great ex- 
tent, the very thing which is often referred to as the 
'inefficient' or 'unbusinesslike' phase of a liberal arts col- 
lege's operation is really but an accurate reflection of its 
true essential purpose." If, in fact, our purpose is to 
educate by teaching a sense of the past and to offer a 
perspective on the future, the point may be reached 
where the relationship of student to teacher may be im- 
peded by staff cutbacks and faculty overloads. Linowitz 
continues: "In my own experience I have found that the 
common complaint on our campuses is not that there is 
too much faculty supervision and companionship, but 
that there is not enough. One of the things which it 
seems to me youngsters should and do look for in a col- 
lege education is a chance to get to know faculty people 



FALL 1973 



13 



of eminence and learning and to spend time with them 
in that close association which is blessedly unique at a 
college or university." It seems to me that we must con- 
tinue to be cost conscious, but that much thought and 
planning is still needed to ensure that our pruning pro- 
cess does not negatively influence the intimate rela- 
tionship that is Susquehanna's greatest asset. 

It is encouraging to us to note that our struggle to 
maintain quality is greatly assisted by the generosity of 
alumni and friends. During the year ending June 30, 
1973, the University received over $889,000 in gifts and 
grants. This record for any one year exceeded the 1972 
total of $834,000 and the 1971 mark of $632,000. The 
annual giving program, The Susquehanna University 
Fund, raised $104,463 and included gifts from 1392 
donors. Of this amount, $37,359 was contributed by 192 
University Associates — alumni and friends giving a 
minimum of $100 to annual giving. The future of the 
University, to a large extent, is in the hands of alumni 
and friends, and elsewhere in this report we are pleased 
to publish a listing of those who have given to Sus- 
quehanna during the fiscal year just ended. 

I am pleased to be able to report that the addition 
to the library which will transform the building into a 
campus-wide learning center is progressing ahead of 
schedule. This $1.3 million project was largely financed 
through gifts to the recently completed capital campaign 
and will more than double the size of the present library. 
The new addition was completed in early August and all 
books and furnishings from the old section were moved 
over during the last week in July. The existing building 
is now under renovation and the entire project is 
scheduled for completion later this fall. In the mean- 
time, the normal functions of a library will be conducted 
from the new wing, which includes stack space for 
180,000 volumes and study space for more than 400 
students. When completed, this structure will provide 
Susquehanna with a superior facility for housing our 
educational resources. 

Reference was made earlier to the fact that the 
University's budget was in balance for the third con- 
secutive year during 1972-73. Our budget projections for 
1973-74 anticipate an enrollment of 1400 and a budget 
of $4,995,000. Again, with the help of alumni and 
friends, the immediate financial future of Susquehanna 
appears sound. A good deal of our effort over the next 
year will be devoted to solutions to long-range problems 
which, by their very nature, will continue to pose a 
formidable challenge to us all. 



IN CONCLUSION 



Much of the success of the University over the past 
several years can be attributed to the Admissions Office. 
Under the direction of Carl M. Moyer, this office has 
functioned efficiently and has brought outstanding 
students to the campus. It is with regret that we an- 
nounce Mr. Moyer's resignation effective September 1 
to enter the world of business. His replacement, Paul W. 
Beardslee, formerly assistant director of admissions at 
Franklin and Marshall College, brings with him over 10 
years of experience in admissions. We welcome Mr. 
Beardslee to our campus. At the same time, I am sorry 
to report that Chaplain J. Stephen Bremer is leaving 
Susquehanna after four years. Pastor Bremer shares our 
thanks for a most productive effort on behalf of the 
hundreds of Susquehanna students and faculty who had 
occasion to work with him. His efforts will remain visi- 
ble for many years and we wish him well at his new post 
as senior pastor of Luther Memorial Lutheran Church 
in Madison, Wisconsin. Dr. Edgar S. Brown Jr., a 
member of Susquehanna's Religion and Philosophy 
Department, will serve as Chaplain to the University. 

Edward J. Malloy, formerly dean of students at 
Union College in Schenectady, New York, assumed a 
similar position at Susquehanna on July 1. He previous- 
ly served in various administrative capacities at Col- 
umbia University and SUNY at Stony Brook. Mr. 
Malloy replaces Roger W. Turnau who left Sus- 
quehanna during the year. 

I would like to acknowledge the contribution Dr. 
Catherine E. Steltz has made to Susquehanna. As dean 
of women and later as acting dean of students, Dr. Steltz 
added vitality to the University during her 12 years here. 
On June 1 she retired and the University gratefully 
recognizes her contribution. 

Proper recognition should be given at this time to 
Dr. Howard E. DeMott, professor of biology who this 
year completed 25 years as a member of the Sus- 
quehanna faculty. As departmental chairman and head 
of the University's Long-range Planning Committee, Dr. 
DeMott has contributed greatly to the growth and 
development of Susquehanna. 

The 1972-73 academic year was not without its 
sadness. Dr. Scott C. Rea, a member of the Board of 
Directors since 1960 and a co-founder of Rea and 
Derick Drug Stores, passed away in early winter. Dr. 
Rea, who received an honorary degree from Sus- 
quehanna, was a primary benefactor of the University. 

The Rev. Dr. John W. Harkins, a member of the 
Class of 1915 and a Board member since 1924, also 
passed away during the year. As the oldest Board 
member from point of service, he regularly attended all 
meetings and added spiritual leadership to the University 
over a period of some 50 years. 

We are pleased to welcome to the Board of Direc- 
tors as an alumni representative Douglas E. Arthur, 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



SUSQUEHANNA 


UNIVERSITY 




Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures and Transfers 




For the Years Ended June 


30, 1973 


and 1972 




REVENUES: 




1973 


1972 


Educational and General: 








Student Tuition and Fees 




$2,932,938 


$2,818,250 


Gifts and Grants 




449,423 


423,498 


Endowment Income 




55,412 


44,512 


Investment Income 




28,257 


22,103 


Other Sources 




94,768 


28,376 


Total Educational and General 




3,560,798 


3,336,739 


Auxiliary Enterprises 




1,362,966 


1,370,579 


Total Revenues 




$4,923,764 


$4,707,318 


EXPENDITURES AND MANDATORY TRANSFERS: 








Educational and General: 








Instructional 




$1,363,044 


$1,340,958 


Library 




93,439 


90,358 


Student Services 




321,399 


303,426 


Operation and Maintenance of Plant 




528,391 


526,673 


General Administration 




212,762 


213,565 


General Institutional 




202,862 


193,254 


Staff Benefits 




216,324 


191,561 


Student Aid 




181,931 


135,334 


Other 




53,972 


20,132 


Total Educational and General 




3,174,124 


3,015,261 


Mandatory Transfers: 








Principal and Interest 




334,202 


337,095 


Renewals and Replacements 




14,750 


14,750 


Total Mandatory Transfers 




348,952 


351,845 


Auxiliary Enterprises: 








Expenditures 




959,205 


934,160 


Mandatory Transfers: 








Principal and Interest 




102,561 


101,048 


Renewals and Replacements 




44,250 


44,250 


Total Auxiliary Enterprises 




1,106,016 


1,079,458 


Total Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers 




$4,629,092 


$4,446,564 


Revenues over Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers 


$ 294,672 


$ 260,754 


OTHER TRANSFERS: 








Plant Funds: 








Current Year Additions 




$ 113,510 


$ 167,914 


Future Plant Additions 




134,237 


89,205 


Retirement of Indebtedness 




7,850 


8,150 


Total Other Transfers 




$ 255,597 


$ 265,269 


Excess of Revenues over Expenditures and Transfers 


$ 39,075 


$ (4,515) 




Class of 1949, a vice president of Nationwide In- 
surance Company. Mr. Arthur has long been active in 
University affairs as a member of the Advisory Council 
and is currently chairman of The Susquehanna Universi- 
ty Fund. John B. Apple, vice president of Butter Krust 
Baking Company of Sunbury, was re-elected to the 
Board for a second term as a representative of the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Synod. 

Henry W. Rozenberg, chairman of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee of the Board, has submitted his 
resignation and will now become an emeritus member. 
During my tenure here, Dr. Rozenberg's experience as a 



professional engineer has saved the University countless 
thousands of dollars and his almost daily visits to the 
campus represent a degree of Board involvement which 
is very rare. In June of this year the University recog- 
nized his service to the University by awarding him an 
honorary degree at the Commencement Exercises. 

As I have indicated, the University is people. As 
long as there is a willingness on the part of faculty and 
staff, Board members and alumni to remain interested in 
this University, I have no apprehension about Sus- 
quehanna's future. 



FALL 1973 



15 



DONORS TO SUSQUEHANN 

1972-197 



The University expresses its appreciation to all who 
have supported its various programs during the period 
July 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973. Gifts reported on 
the following pages cover gifts received during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1973. Pledges to the various 
University programs are not acknowledged here, but 
payments on such pledges are included. One asterisk 
denotes a gift of $100 or more; two asterisks, $500 or 
more. A dagger after the name indicates that a matching 
gift was received from the donor's employer. A separate 
list of University Associates, those giving $100 or more 
to annual giving — The Susquehanna University Fund 
— is included at the beginning of the donors' section. 
The following list is comprehensive of all donors to the 
University. 



GIFTS AND GRANTS 








Source of Support 


1970-71 


1971-72 


1972-73 


Alumni 




$133,180 


$166,291 


$167,500 


Parents, Friends 


60,806 


102,774 


59,828 


Corporations, 


Foundations 


135,187 


212,028 


173,666 


Church 




187,369 


147,557 


149,319 


Bequests 




53,654 


55,654 


5,000 


Other 




63,780 


150,000 


334,196 






$633,976 


$834,304 


$889,509 


UNIVERSITY 


ASSOCIATES 









(Alumni and friends contributing $100 or more to 

The Susquehanna University Fund 

during the period July 1, 1972-June 30, 1973.) 



Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Myrl E. Alexander hc'72 

Dorothy M. Anderson '62 

John B. Apple 

Douglas E. Arthur '49 

Arch A. '20 and Katharine Heldt 

Aucker '44 
Fred A. '50 & Marilyn Stadtlonder 

Auman x'53 
John M. Auten '28 
Nelson E. Bailey '57 
Harrison W. Bonce 
John H. Baum hc'7! 
Merle A. Beam '22 
Norman R. Benner '25 
Earl L. Bernstine '50 
Thomas N. Berryman III '71 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Bishop '30 
Mr. & Mrs. H. Vernon Blough '31 
Roger M. Blough '25, hc'53 
Herbert G. Boettger '66 
Charles R. Bowen '62 
Grace C. Boyle '33 
Mabel Steffen Broscious '21 
William R. Burchfield 
Dr. & Mrs. Leonard F. Bush hc'70 
Harry W. '48 & Virginia Doss 

Butts '48 
Carol Royer Caddell '59 
Edna L. Carichner 
Mr. & Mrs. Russell Carmichael '34 
Alvin W. Carpenter '24 
Samuel D. Clapper '68 
James R. '46 & Mary Jane Rudy 

Clark x'44 
Sidney Cohn 



Edward L. Dolby '22 

Sue C. Davis '66 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Degenstein 

Harold E. Ditzler '28 

Lewis R. Drumm Jr. '53 

William Duck '11 

Phyllis S. Ellis 

Roland A. Erickson h'70 

Lee M. '32 & Janet Leitzell 

Fairchild '32 
William O. Faylor Sr. 
H. R. Fenstermacher '32 
Helen G. Fisher '13 
Lawrence C. Fisher '31 
Mrs. Nelson F. Fisher 
Russell I. Fisher '63 
Shelton Fisher hc'68 
A.N. & Ida Olmsted Fredrickson '21 
Nora Steinhards Galins '54 
James C. '50 4. Martha Martin 

Gehris '51 
Laird S. Gemberling '33 
Dr. & Mrs. Euell T. Gibbons hc'72 
Gynith C. Giffin h'68 
Joyce K. Gilbert '54 
Russell W. Gilbert h'37 
Robert C. Goetze 
Wallace E. Gordon '54 
W. David Gross '47 
Delsey Morris Gross '27 
Wallace J. Growney 
Robert G. Gundaker '64 
Melvin E. Haas '42 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Haines '31 
Arnold C. & Mary Jane Jessen 

Hanson '49 
Herbert & Laura Arnold Hart '27 



Harold E. & Jeanne Attinger 

Hassinger x'51 
Robert A. Heinbach 
Sherman E. Herrold '28 
Marjorie Michael Hinds '31 
D. Edgar '34 & Aberdeen Phillips 

Hutchison '34 
Lawrence M. '43 & Louise Kresge 

Isaacs '45 
Emily McEiwee Jamison '27 
Harvey P. '53 & Helen Von Lynn 

Jeffers '53 
John & Miriam Garner Johnson '41 
David S. Kammerer '16 
Hilda Karniol h'64 
Henry J. '39 & Betty Johnston 

Kelt '38 
Fred W. & Esther Yingling Kern '38 
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Kindsvatter '32 
Kenneth R. '40 & Naomi Bingaman 

Kinney '40 
Horry L. & Elizabeth Hauser 

Kinsel '28 
Mr. & Mrs. Bradley D. Kirk 
Bruce D. Kirk '72 
John B. Kniseley '13 
James F. & Ruth Bergstresser Koch '34 
Daniel G. Kohler 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Krahmer h'67 
R. Lynn & Rose Ann Gumbert 

Krape '29 
Eleanor Robison Landes h'60 
William L. Landes '71 
Norman H. Lauer '62 
Richard C. Leib 
William & Alice Ann Patterson 

Leidel '58 
Ralph W. loew hc'72 
Charles R. Loss '40 
R.L. Lubold '13 
Paul B. Lucas '28 
Alma V. McCollough '24 
John S. Magrane 
D.C. Malcolm 
Stephen J. Martinec '35 
Richard H. Melonder '61 
Seward Prosser '65 & Karen Boyd 

Mellon x'65 
James R. Middleswarth '60 
Rebecca Shade Mignot '54 
Wayne W. Miller '65 
Charles A. Morris '49 
William S. Morrow '34 
Mr. & Mrs. Myer R. Musser '30 
Paul D. Ochenrider '39 
Jennie Kauffman Pennel '28 
Douglas A. Portzline '41 
Robert W. Pritchard '36 
Robert U. Redpath 
Katharine P. Reed '29 
Norman W. & Nancy Griesemer 

Reifsnyder '42 
Otto Reimherr h'67 
Beatrice Rettinger '23 
Simon '30 & Kathryn Jarrett 

Rhoads x'34 
Harry M. Rice '26 
Mr. & Mrs. J. William Riden '29 
Warren E. Ries '72 
Edward S. '42 & Blanche Forney 

Rogers '42 
Helen O. Rogers '39 
Bryan C. Rothfuss '23 
Paul A. Rothfuss '17 
C. Howard Rothfuss '22 
William E. Royer '33 
Henry W. Rozenberg hc'73 
Willard '41 & Hilda Frederick 

Schadel '40 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Scharfe '31 
M. Jane Schnure '39 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry P. Shaffer '29 
Paul C. Shatto Sr. 

Andrew & Ruth Buffington Smith '49 
G. Wellington & lucy Herr Smith '26 
Robert A. Smith '62 
Helen Ott Soper '28 
George A. '29 & Gertrude Arbogast 

Spaid '29 
Albert P. Stauderman hc'73 
J. Donald Steele '33 
Mary G. Steele '14 
John R. '51 & Lois Gordon 

Steiger '52 
Richard L. Steinberg '68 
Catherine E. Steltz h'68 
Cheryl R. Stickle '68 
Norman F. & Ann Latimer Strate '64 



W. Alfred Streamer '26 

John W. Thompson '09 

Sara Ulrich Tollinger '34 

Robert N. Troutman '26 

S.P. Turnbach 

Dorothy Turner '36 

Robert A. Updegrove '41 

W. Ralph Wagenseller '00 (deceased) 

Donald R. Walk '55 

Ira A. Wassenberg '47 

Dr. & Mrs. Gustave W. Weber h'64 

Robert F. Weis 

Helen Salem Wescoat '19 

H. W. Wieder 

Robert J. & Eileen Boone Winter '43 

Mr. & Mrs. E. E. Wissinger 

Ralph Witmer '15 

Waiter '64 & Candace Fink 

Woernle '63 
Efrem Zimbalist Jr. hc'66 



ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS 

1900 

*W. Ralph Wagenseller (deceased) 

1907 

D. Franklin Fisher 

1908 

Ralph W. Showers 

1909 

**J. Bannen Swope 
*John W. Thompson 

1911 

**C. Thomas Aikens, in memory of 

Claude G. Aikens '11 
'William N. Duck 

1913 

*Helen G. Fisher 
*John B. Kniseley 
*R.L. Lubold 
Sarah B. Manhort 

1914 

Mary Ressler Dale 
*Mary G. Steele 

1915 

*J. Frank Faust 
Susan Geise Shannon 
Alice F. Weaver 
Catherine A. Weaver 
Gertrude F. Weaver 
•*Ralph Witmer 

1916 

Martin L. Dolbeer 
*David S. Kammerer Sr. 
Bess Fetterolf Keller 

1917 

*Phoebe Herman 
P. Kepner Jarrett 
Ira C. Mummert 
Elizabeth Hall Neideigh 
Marion Moyer Potteiger 
Paul D. Stees 



Gifts for Current Operations 



Year 


Amount 


1966-67 


$147,000 


1967-68 


149,000 


1968 69 


193,000 


1969-70 


261,000 


1970-71 


280,000 


1971-72 


260,000 


1972-73 


253,000 



1918 

Eva P. Herman 
Katherine Persing 
Marion Rose Phillips 
Clarence F. Walker 

1919 

Willard D. AMbeck 
Judith Allen 

Charlotte Weaver Cassler 
*Helen Salem Wescoat 

1920 

*Arch A. Aucker 

Evelyn Allison Boeder 

Ernest B. Cassler 
*Esther Cressman 

Susan Rearick Shannon 

Paul G. Winey 

1921 

**Anonymous 

Rupert C. Benner 
*Mabel StefFen Broscious 

Marshall B. Diehl 
*lda Olmsted Fredrickson 

Raymond F. Getty 

Marie Romig Huntington 
*Ellis K. Lecrone 

Ruth Welker Schwartz 

Ruth Larue Thompson 

1922 

*Merle A. Beam (deceased) 
*Edward L. Datby 

Beatrice Fisher Dunning 

G.R. Groninger 

Lester J. Kaufman 
*Alma L. Long 
'Bessie C. Long 
*Nora Goff Manleyf 
*C. Howard Rothfuss 
•George W, Townsend 

1923 

Dorothy Margerum App 

Reide Bingaman 

John I. & Stella Risser Cole 
**Marlyn R. Fetterolf 

Mary Beck Grant 

Edgar B. Hanks 
'Beatrice Rettinger 
*Bryan C. Rothfuss 

Thomas H. Stetler 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Weible 

1924 

Miriam Rearick Bingaman 
*Margaret Widlund Blough 
*Alvin W. Carpenter 

W. John Derr 
**Mobel Kinzey Fetterolf 

Cornelius S. Jarrett 

Raymond W. Klinedinst 

Hilda Bohner Lutz 

Sara Marguerite Reichenbach 
Martin 
"Miss Alma V. McCollough 

Mary K. Potteiger 

Helen J. Rearick 

Rachel Brubaker Wfiited 

1925 

*N.R. Benner 
••Roger M. Blough 

Dorothy Clarke Creager 
*Marlin M. Enders 
Harland D. Fague 
C. Ralph Gramley 
Martin L. Grossman 
'Robert J. Keeler 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Mark Owens and 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Kerlin Jr., 
in memory of their father 
Frank R. Kerlin Sr. 
William L. Nicholls 
Anna E. ONnger 
W. Earl Thomas 

1926 

*Lee E. Boyer 
Percy B. Davis 
Theodore E. Ebberts Sr. 
Sara Hassinger Fague 



Hayes C. Gordon 

Margaret E. Keiser 

Lester B. Lutz 

Martha Larson Martin 

Anna M. Norwat 
**Harry M. Rice 

Austin C. Roche 
*G. Oliver Sands 
**Lucy Herr Smith 
*W. Alfred Streamer 

Oliver S. Swisher 
"Robert N. Troutman 

Orren R. Wagner 

Parke R. Wagner 

Luther M. Weaver Jr. 

1927 

Ruth J. Brubaker 
••Charles E. Chaffee 

Elsie Nace Enders 
"Delsey Morris Gross 
*Laura Arnold Hart 
*Zelda F. Haus 
*Emily McElwee Jamison 

Anna Brosious Klinedinst 

Grace Beckley Kramer 

Ruth Evans Sebastian 
•Lloyd A. Stahl 

Roland M. Swartzwelder 

M. Thelma Taylor 

Brooks L. Walton 

Bert E. Wynn 

1928 

*John M. Auten 

Richard Baxter 

Margaret H. Buyers 

Kenneth M. Cassell 
** Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee 

Edwin O. Constable 

Vesta Steininger Cook 
"Harold E. Ditzler 

Betty Stong Eichelberger 

Elizabeth May Fisher 

Ruth Folkmann 
'Laura L. Gemberling 

Dorothy Goff 

Eva Leiby Grace 
*Mr. & Mrs. Harry Haney 
•Sherman E. Herrold 
**Mary Farlling Hollway 

Jerome B.S. Kaufman 

Grace Williams Keller 
••Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel 

Jacob O. Kroen 
•Hannah Pitner Lambertf 

Lillian Fisher Long 
•Paul B. Lucas 

Mary Weimer Moffitt 
*Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin T. Moyer 
•Jennie Kauffman Pennel 

Marvin W. Schlegel 
•Ray G. Sheeler 
•Helen Ott Soper 

Sara Seal Stauffer 

Mary Dreese Strieker 

Mary Wentze! Updegrove 

W. Lee Vorlage 

Essex Botsford Wagner 

Eleanor O'Donnell Wargny 

Prudence Wilson Weaver 



1929 

Helen Simons Barrick 

Helen Ammerman Brown 
*Edna L. Carichner in memory of 
her husband Henry R. Carichner 
'29 

Robert W. & Eleanor Coons Crouse 

Lee S. Deppen 

Marian Klinger Derrick 

Nancy Lecrone Fay 

Helen Carter Gehret 

Gertrude Fisher Jones 

Ruth Dively Kaufman 

Robert P. Kemble 
•R. Lynn & Rose Gumbert Krape 

Mildred Potteiger 

Rebecca C. Puffenberger 
•Katherine P. Reed 

Raymond O. Rhine 
*J. William Riden Jr. 

Russell T. Shilling 
•George A. & Gertrude Arbogast 
Spa id 

Walter W. Swank 

Allen C. Tressler 



CAPSULE CAMPAIGN REPORT 

The final results of the recently concluded Signpost For 
The Seventies campaign are given below. In all respects, this 
capital funds drive was the most successful in Susquehanna's 
history and speaks well for the interest and generosity of 
alumni and friends. Of the $2,041,000 raised, approximately 
50 percent of the funds were used for construction of the 
library addition scheduled for completion later this fall. The 
remaining balance has been utilized for endowment and for 
introducing new educational programs. A breakdown of gifts 
from major areas: 







Number of 




Area 




Donors 


Amount 


Susquehanna Valley 




476 


$ 662,738 


Harrisburg 




121 


37,515 


York-Lancaster 




160 


107,250 


Lewistown-State College 


113 


120,063 


North Jersey-Metro. 


N.Y. 


155 


156,090 


Philadelphia 




204 


54,024 


Pittsburgh 




51 


115,681 


Johnstown 




63 


23,870 


Washington, D.C. 




60 


13,100 


Altoona 




24 


36,028 


South Jersey 




17 


44,100 


Miscellaneous Areas 




131 


151,870 


Other Gifts Secured 


Through 






Special Gifts Solic 


itation 


21 


519,220 



1,596 



$2,041,549 




Frank C. Wagenseller 
Frank W. Weaver 



Harry S. Baird 
*Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Bishop 
*Carl C. Bossier 

Verna I. Brooks 

Sherman E. Good 

Mary E. Greninger 

Wellington P. Hartman 

Mary Eastep Hill 

Howard K. Hilner 

Oren S. Kaltriter 

Hubert C. Koch 

Florence Lauver 

J. Richard Mattern 
*Myer R. Musser Sr. 
•Ruth Goff Nicodemus 

John S. Rhine 
•Simon B. Rhoads 

William F. Routzahn 

James M. Scharf 

G. Marlin Spaid 

1931 

*Alvin T. Barber 

Lois Brungart Bendigo 
*Mr. & Mrs. H. Vernon Blough 
John L. Boney 
••Thomas J. & Martha Laudenslager 

Davis 
••Lawrence C. Fisher 
Frank C. Gill 
•Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Haines 
William S. Herman 
•Marjorie Michael Hinds 
Gerhard F. Kern, in memory of his 
father Dr. H. A. Frederick Kern- 
•George H. Lambertf 

Mary E. Lauver 
*Bryce E. Nicodemus 
Inez Server Parker 
Paul D. Reamer 
*Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Scharfe Jr. 
Charles J. Shearer 
Dorothy Turnbach Stickney 
Nellie Shue von Dorster 
Sara Haines Zimmerman 



1932 

Melvin S. 
•Martha Gessner Anderson 

Thelma E. Crebs 
*Lee M. & Janet Leitzel Fairchild 
•Herman R. Fenstermacher 

Roscoe L. Fisher 

Lewis R. Fox 
•Herbert G. Hohman 

Merle E. Hubbard 

Dorothy Arbogast Kaltriter 
•John F. Kindsvatter 

Andrew V. Kozak 

Arline Kanyuck Lerda 
•Marie Miller Mostoller 

Dorothy Forcey Pletcher 

1933 

Beatrice Gentzler Armold 
•Grace C. Boyle 

Frederick L. Carl 

Selon F. Dockey 

Martha A. Fisher 
* Laird S. Gemberling 

John L. Hassay 

Margaret Ide Maguire 

Mae McDonald McGroarty 

Helen Caffrey McMullen 

Walter C. Metzger 

E. Dorothea Meyer 

John W. Meyers 
'William E. Royer 

John A. Schoffstall Sr. 

Frances Stambaugh Shade 

Flora Ellmore Shilling 

Mildred Griesemer Snyder 
"J. Donald Steele 

Paul A. Swank 

William R. Swarm 

Amelia Krapf Williams 

Bruce F. & Marian Walborn 
Worthington 

1934 
*Peter Blackwood 

Marlin C. Bottiger 

Harry A. Carl 
•Bernice & Russell Carmichael 

Edwin M. Clapper 



Edith Frankenfield Cramer 

Audra Martz Etrweiler 

Ruth Plummer Fagan 

Madeline Steininger Herman 

Earnest W. Huston 
*D. Edgar & Aberdeen Phillips 

Hutchisont 
"Ruth Bergstresser Koch 

Daniel McKelvey 

Daniel S. McMullen 
'William S. Morrow 
'Pauline Crow Mount 
'Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads 

Lee D. Rishel 

Dr. & Mrs. Harold L. Rowe 

Jerauld M. Schlegel 

Richard B. Shade 
"Sara Ulrich Tollinger 
•Arthur C. Webber 

Ella Oberdorf Wilson 

1935 

"Kenneth R. Anderson 

Timothy Barnes 

Robert R. Clark 
*Ralph C. Geiglo 
"Louise Mehring Koontz 
"Stephen J. Marttnec 

Frances Hubler Nuernberg 

Anna E. dinger 
"•Erie I. Shobert llf 

Mary Patterson Yeager 

1936 

Frederic C. Billman 

Max S. Blair 

Gwendolyn Schlegel Cramer 

H. Vernon Ferster 

Kathryn Weber Ftnkbiner 

James A. Grossman! 
•Janet Earhart Harkins 

Paul E. Hartman 

Horace M. Hutchison 

Pearl M. Kaler 

Mr. & Mr. Eugene D. Mitchell 
•Robert W. Pritchard 

Mary London Russell 

Reginald P. Seavey 
•Ralph I. Shockey 

El wood I. Stahl {deceased) 

Marcella Chaya Turnbach 
"Dorothy Turner 

Walter Wastlewski 

1937 

Eleanor Jones Barnes 

Oren N. Bennerf 

Donald A. Gaver 

Mary Scon Gumpher 

Newton E. Hess 
•Lester J. Karschner 

Woodrow J. Klinger 
•John C. McCune 

Elsie Myers 

Frances Smith Novinger 

B. Henry Shofer 

E. Raymond Shaheen 

Helen Wentzel Spitzner 

John B. Ulp 

Walter S. VanPoyck 

Mary Ann Fox Wagenseller 

1938 

Robert A. Boyer 
•George A. Clark 

Ethel Ramer Coulter 

Mary Helm Davey 

Jean Rheinhart Hodgdon 
•'Elizabeth Johnston Keil 
'Esther Yingling Kernf 
'Ray W. Kline 

Karl E. Kniseley 
••Herbert C. Louver 

Alverna Reese Lorah 
'Chester P. Norbertt 

John H. Paul 
•Vernon R. Phillips 

John Rakshys 

Charles J. Stauffer 

Elizabeth Fry Vogel 

1939 

"Robart M. Bastress 

Leroy K. Beachel 
•Jean B. Beamenderfer 
"Henry J. Keil 

Alverna Reese Lorah 
•Paul C. Ochenrider 



Mathilda Neudoerffer Powell 
'Helen Rogers 
*M. Jane Schnure 
'Shirley Finkbeiner Stehlin 

Eleanor Saveri Wise 

1940 

Andrew A. Clark 

Donald A. Critchfield 

Edward E. Eisenhart 

Fern Zechman Ferster 
"Robert A. Gabrenya 
'William H. Gehron Jr. 

J. Leon Haines 

Anna Reeder Heimbach 

Horace A. Kauffman 
'Kenneth R. & Naomi Btngaman 

Kinney 
"Eunice Arentz Knupp 

Florence Landback Latsha 
"Florence Rothermel Latsha 
'Charles R. Loss 

William L. Mease 

Helen Wright Mosebey 

William E. Nye II 

Paul M. Orso 

Hilda Friederick Schadel 

Harold E. Shaffer 

Barner S. Swartz 

1941 

•Florence Reitz Brenneman 
'Joseph F. Campana 

Lois Yost Critchfield 
"Joseph F. Greco 

Elaine Miller Hunt 
"John & Miriam Garner Johnson 
'Mary Emma Yoder Jones 
"Jane Hutchison Kaempferf 

Margaret Dunkie Kniseley 
'Elizabeth Reese McGhee 

Faith Harbeson McNitt 
'Douglas A. Portzline 

John P. Powell 

Lois Beamenderfer Rallis 

Ruth Specht Richter 

Willard H, Schadel 

Clyde D. Sechler 
'Jane Wormley Shaffer 

Ruth Naylor Shaffer 
*Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Shafto 
'Robert A. Updegrove 

1942 

*Melvin E. Haas 

Jeanne Fenner Helmf 

Martin Hopkins 

John D. Ickes 
•Albert C. Knapp 

William H. Mitman 
'Nancy Griesemer Reifsnyder 

Delphine Hoover Reitz 
"Edward S. & Blanche Forney Rogers 

1943 

Eugene R. DeBarr 

Ethel Kniffin Flannery 

James W. Hall 

John C. Helmt 
"Dorothy Dellecker Hochstuhl 

Marion Crow llgen 
" Lawrence M. Isaacsf 

Frederic G. MacQuesten 
•Ruth E. McCorkill 
*Marjorie Wolfe McCune 

Jessie Walton Schmirthenner 

Louise McWilliams Sechler 

Donald F. & Ruth Billow Spooner 
•Jack V. Walsh 
'Eileen Boone Winter 

1944 

"Katharine Heldt Aucker 
"Mary Jane Rudy Clark 

Wilmer H. Grimm 
'William A. Jr. & Margaret Gemmill 

Janson 
•Jean Renfer Kolb 

Janet Hoke Reiff 
•Raymond R. Schrammf 

Helen Hocker Schueler 

E. Jane Stitt 

Catherine Byrod Whitman 

1945 

Ira F. Bradford Jr. 
Mary Moyer Bringman 



Frances Bittinger Burgess 
'Louise Kresge Isaacsf 

Corinne Kahn Kramer 

Harold R. Snyder 
'Herman G. Stuempfle 

1946 

"James R. Clark 
Marie Klick Hodick 
Roswell J. Johns 
Norma Hazen Jones 
•Jean Wheat Schramm! 
C. Glenn Schueler 
Dorothy Sternat Thomas 
Rine G. Winey Jr. 

1947 

William E. Bomgardner 

Ferdinand R. Bongartz 

Franklin E. Fertig 
'Mary Lizzio Govekar 
•W. David Gross 
"Raymond G. Hochstuhl 

Lenore Garman Horner 

Gayle Clark Johns 

Nancy Myers Landis 

Jacqueline Braveman Mayper 

Richard D. Moglia 

George E. Riegel 
•Ira A. Wasserberg 

Elyse Thompson Wohlsen 

Ruth Williams Zeidler 

1948 

Shirley Shroyer Bartholomew 
John B. & Dawn Ebert Bergstresser 
David E. & Betty Smith Bomboy 
Dale S. Bringman 
Russell F. Brown 
•Harry W. & Virginia Doss Butts 
Aloysius V. Derr 
Elaine Laks Dunn 
•'Frank K. Fetterolf 
Harry S. Flickinger 
Eugene H. & Dorothy Eilhart 

Grundrumt 
H. Lee Hebel 

Caroline Graybill Heimberger 
Carl L. Herman 
Donald L. Herrold 
Sara Lee Smith Ivers 
Harold R. Kramer 
Marlin P. Krouse 
*Richard W. & Gertrude Roberts 
Lindemannt 
Kenneth D. Loss 
Robert W. Radell 
Martha Sharwarko Reid 
Lois Dauberman Schultz 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul B. Stetler 
Dexter M. Weikel 
•Robert E. Winter 
Robert F. Wohlsen 
William P. Yancho 
Frank A. Zeidler 
Marianna Hazen Zimmerman 

1949 

*Douglas E. Arthurf 

Elaine Williams Barner 

Paul R. Bingaman 

Kay L. Bloom 

Phyllis Swartz Derr 

John G. Devine 

Robert & Margaret Williams 
Dornsifet 

Lillian Kepner Duden 

Lois Young Guistwhite 

Irma Strawbridge Hallenbeck 
"Mary Jane Jessen Hansen 

Edith Wegner Hebel 

Mary Ann Getsinger Homan 

Stanley P. Houser 

Margaret Appleby Kemmler 

Harvey H. Kuhns Jr. 

Jane Southwick Mathias 

Elwood M. McAllister 
'Charles A. Morris 

Winifred Myers O'Dell 

Kenneth D. Orr 

Warren S. & Margaret Latta 
Outerbridge 

Warren J. Pirie 

James B. Reilly 
•Helen Smith Sanders 
"Nevin C.T. Shaffer 
•Ruth Bufftngton Smith 



Anna Brtndel Thomas 
Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. 
Willis B. VanDyke 
Erma Bonawitz Warnes 
John H. Wright Jr. 

1950 

"Fred A. Auman Jr. 
*Earl L. Bernstine 

Harry M. Bobonlch 

Paul B. & Virginia Blough Buehler 

Maria Shetler Bull 

Robert L. Caldwellf 

Henry G. Chadwick 
"James C. Gehris 

Floris Guyer Mains 

Barbara Watkins Hartley 
•Fred Hazeltine 

Paul J. Herb 

Patricia Houtz 

R. Nelson K-ost 

Frances Roush Kovacic 
'Raymond C. Lauver 
•Everett M. & Jeanne Kahler 

Manning 
'Jean Rothermel Miller 

JoAnn Hort Moyer 

Robert E. Ricedorff 
'James O. Rumbaugh 
'Louis F. Santangelot 

Fred W. Schultz Jr. 

Barbara Decker Siegfried 

Janet Wolf Statler 

Harry G. Stetser 

Frank T. Ulman 

Paul A. Wagner 

Richard G. Westervelt 

Lloyd T. Wilson 
"Donald E. Wissinger 

1951 

Robert L. Bitting 
'Marsh C. Bogar 

Herbert O. Bollinger 

William H. Bosch 
"Hazel Brobst Brown 

Jack A. Brown 

Lyn Bailey D'Alessandro 
* 'Martha Martin Gehris 

Herbert R. Hains 
•Jeanne Attinger Hassinger 

Gardiner N. Marek 

Marilyn Beers Reilly 

Merrill W. Shafert 

Charles L. & Audrey MacNeil 
Shaffer 

William R. Smeltz 
•John R. Steigerf 

Susan Foltz Tietbohl 

Mary Lehman VanDyke 

Emil Weiler Jr. 
•Flora Barnhart Wissinger 

1952 

Elinor Tyson Aurand 

Russell C. Bartle 

Donald C. Berninger 

Vincent E. Boyer 
*Charles H. & Voylet Dietz Carr 

C. Dale Gateman 
•James Hazlett 
'Patricia F. Heathcote 
•Lester G. Heilman Jr. 

Barbara Easton Johns 
'Kay LaRue Lauver 

Faye R. Lewis 
'Lorraine Rarick Liddington 
•Donald A. Linn 

Ethel McGrath Meola 

William R. Nale 

Miriam Vogler Olson 

Edward J. Palkovich 
•Kathleen Schnerr Price 

William H. Prichard 

Ruth Smith Robinson 

Chester G. Rowe 

Lois Gordon Steigerf 

John J. Tokach 

G. Allan Vollmerst 

Janet Wingert Yetter 

Nancy E. Youhon 

Charles Zlock 

1953 

Marilyn Stadtlander Auman 
Ruth Freed Bosch 
Madeline Lease Cook 
James A. Deitch 



*Lewis R. Drumm Jr. 

Lois Fisher Fredricksont 

V. Carl Gaconof 
"Harvey P. & Helen Von Lynn 

Edward P. Kopf 

William P. LaMarca 

Robert J. MacNamara '53 
Memorial Fund 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Dalton 
William G. & Bertha M. Groves 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. 

MacNamara 
Robert L. & Shirley S. Scholl 
Mr. & Mrs. Don Stryffeler 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Williams 

Beatrice Morrow Myers 

T. Justin Myers Jr. 
*Paul R. Nestler Jr. 

Samuel Porter Jr. 

Marvel Cowling Robinson 

Lillian Whittington Roush 

Dean E. Rupe 

James W. Shipton 

Charles A. Snyder Jr. 

Josephine Stuter 

Edward T. Unangst 

Ernest R. Walker 

Margaret Zinda Weaver 

Robert C. Wyllie 

Gunnar W. Zorn 



1954 

"Henry R. Albright 

Irene Meerbach Anderson 

Marilyn Huyett Becker 

Bruce T. Bobb 

Edward J. Flowers 
"Nora Steinhards Galins 

John W. Gass 
*Joyce K. Gilbert 

Ronald F. Goodman 
"Wallace E. Gordon 

Marlin V. Heffner 

Irene Oldt Huss 

Eleanor Borski King 

Wanda Harmon LaMarca 

Edward E. Lamb Jr. 
"George C. Liddington 
"Graydon I. Lose 
"Rebecca Shade Mignotf 

Charles A. Newcomer 

Ruth E. Osborn 

Eleanore Steffey Rachau 

Frank D. Richards 

John H. Schraeder 

Jack M. Schreffler 

Louis A. Szabof 

Janet Larue Touring 
"Owen W. Underkoffler 

Dorothy Sites Wagner 

Audrey M. Warnets 

Faye Kostenbauder Williamson 

Richard N. Young 

Barbara Morris Zorn 



1955 

Walter C. Albert 

Bruce A. Bel If 

Larry R. & Carlene Lamade 
Bingaman 

Margaret Gordon Bonawitz 

Charles W. & Marie Sharretts 
Coates 

Kenneth F. Erdley 

Shirley Decker Gateman 
"James J. Gormleyf 

Daniel O. Hoy 

Mary Bingaman Kleintop 

Harry P. Kocher Jr. 

Carol Cornelius Lamb 

W. Deen Lauver 

Richard E. McCartyj 

Ruth Scott Nunn 

Annabelle Thomas Rogers 

Frederick L. Shilling 

James G. Showalter 

Frank G. Smith 

Nancy Hermann Snook 
"Merle F. Ulsh 

"William H. Vanderhoof Jr., in honor 
of Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin Lotz hc'61 
"Donald R. Walk 



Deborah Krapf Bellf 

John C. & Charlotte Meerbach 
Bunke 
"Carol Dauberman Chidsey 

Henry S. Cook 

Charlotte Sandt Erdley 
"Elsie Gruber Gormleyf 

Nancy L. Kline 

Eleanor Dively Mora 

Anna Jane Moyer 

Mary Hifdebrand Naugle 
"Helene A. Nestler 

Nancy McCullough Saborio 

Joanne Mummert Spongier 

Gene A. Stettier 
"Audrey Vollman Vanderhoof, in 
honor of Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin 
Lotz hc'61 

Joan Raudenbush Wendel 

John D. & Janet Gerner Yeich 

Margaret Brady Wyllie 

1957 

**Lynn Hassinger Askew 
""Nelson E. Bailey 

Jack K. Bishopf 

George R. Cawley 
"Marion D. Drumhetler 

Ronald E. Fouche 

Jane Longenecker Grim 

Park H. Haussler 

Helen Thomas Heilman 
*John S. Hendricksf 

Max J. Herman 

Dwight A, Huseman 

Earl F. Kleintop 

Natalie Wilhour Maurer 

Suzanne Beal McCartyt 

Peter M. Nunn 

Gloria Masteller Pollitt 

George H. Pospisilf 
"Edward R. Rhodes 

Frank L. Romano 

Martha McNitt Runkle 

Suzanne Wahl Schaeffert 

Galen W. Schlichter 

Barbara Boob Shaffer 

Sandra Gilfillan Showalter 

Dorothy Wardle Spencer 

Janet Swenson Updegrove 
*Patricia A. Walker 

Joan Rauenbush Wendel 
"Arthur A. Zimmerman 

1958 

"Anne M. Ambromovage 

Janice Arcidiacono-Paul 

David R. & Fern Keefer Boyer 

Richard H. Cahn 
"Fred J. Chrvala 
"Mary Louise Neal Coleman 

Baird E. Collins 

George S. Dodge 
""Burdell S. Faust 

Mary Lou Ernst Fonberg 

Wade L. Hoffman 

Doris Keener Holcomb 

James A. Keiser 
"Alice Ann Patterson Leidel 

Nancy Ridinger Leonard 

Wayne W. & Janet Gordon Rutz 



Nancy Lockett Savage 
"Mary Moore SchatkowskS 

Lee Erholm Smith 
"Richard C. Smith Jr. 

Carolyn Gillospie Snow 

Mary E. Souden 

Sara V. Troutman 

Harry D. Wagner 

Gail R. Weikel 
"James W. & Gail Woolbert White 

Robert A. & Gloria Myers Willauer 

1959 

Ronald G. Allerj 

John T. Baskin 

Lester L. Brubaker 
"Carol Royer Caddeil 

Lois Andren Denliker 

Carolyn Birkhimer Ernst 

Robert L. Fiscust 

Gerald O. Fletcher 

Margaret Brubaker Gray 

Denece Newhard Haussler 

Barbara Tongue Herold 

Roger A. Holtzapple 

Janis Adams John 

Harry E. Leonard 

Donald L. Middtesworth 

Susan Lehman Northrup 

Joseph & Sandra Meyer Osinchak 

Mary-Margaret Overly Peraro 
"Eleanor D. Pourron 
"Sidney F. Richardf 

Gail Muller Romano 

Margaret Burns Rovendro 

Carl S. Shoemaker 
"Eugene Witiak 

Ray J. Yeingst 
"Margaret Dalby Zimmerman 

1960 

Joseph S. Aleknavage 
"Donald E. Coleman 

Caroline Shryrock Conrad 

Marilyn Faiss DelGiudice 

Ralph W. & Helen Harding Ferraro 

Melvyn C. Finklestein 

Donald M. Gray 

Gary A. Hackenberg 

C. Edward Huber 

Sandra Kimmel Huseman 

A. Gerald & Ella Koch Kunklef 

Sarah Myers Lee 

Sarah Lee McCahan 
"James R. Middleswarth 

Stephanie Haase Moore 

Joyce Arnold Post 

Harry L. Powers 

Richard D. Reichard 

Ray E. Richie 
"Kermit R. Ritter 

Allen I. Rowe 
"Denny R. & June Nonnemacher 

Shank 
"Larry W. Updegrove 
"Willi K. Weichelt 

Larry A. Wingard 

1961 

Barbara Angle Alierf 
""Gilbert C. Askew 





MEMORIAL GIFTS 



During the period July 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973 the 
University received gifts in memory of: 



Harry J. Bailey 
Bertha B. Degenstem 
Elizabeth G. Eyster '72 
Joan H. Keller '70 
Frank R. Kerlin Sr. '25 
Dr. Charles Leese h'37 



J. Edward Lenker 

Dr. Robert J. MacNamara Jr. 

Dr. Scott C. Rea hc'63 

The Rev. Elwood I. Stahl '36 

Walter S. Van Poyck '37 



'53 



1956 

Evelyn Herbstrith Baker 
Richard P. Barry 



A gift was also received in honor of: 

Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin Lotz hc'61 

BEQUESTS 

Dr. George E. Holzapple to establish the "Mahala Gladfelter Holzapple Fund" 



Maurice Bobst Jr. 

Carl F. Bogar 

Lee R. Conrad 

Louis R. & Margaret Webb Coons 

Charles P. Dietrich 

Richard L. Fausey 

Jane Kistner Finklestein 

Linda Traub Fiscust 

R. Allen Fiscus 

Annamae Hockenbrock Horwhat 

Marlin A. Inch 

Thomas J. Keener 

Robert E. Leighty 

Linda K. Leonard 

Carol J. McCloy 

Laurence W. Miller 

Gary L. Moore 
""Nancy Davis Raabf 

Neat D. Rebuck 
"Sandra Brandt Richardf 

W. Frank & Jane Panian Rieger 

Janice Stahl Snyder 

Mary Adams Voughtt 
"Robert A. Welker 

1962 

"Dorothy M. Anderson 

Elizabeth Hodges Bagger 

Judith A. Blee 
"Charles R. Bowen 

Ned S. Coates 

Ray F. Cragle 

Norman A. Crickenberger 

Fritz J. Fichtner Jr. 

Joan Whitson Fletcher 

Joan E. Haefle 

H. Nathan Kale 
"Norman H. Lauer 

Joan Lawley Leighty 
"Robert R. Lindemuth 

Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan 

Judith Arnold Mclntyre 

Dorothy Shomper McManus 
"Jean Ewald Middleswarth 

Judith Behrens Myers 

George P. & Sally Lockett Pressleyt 
""John H. Raabt 

Richard E. Rohland 

Joyce Sheesley Shirey 
"Robert Alan Smith 

John H. Spillman 

Alan L. Thomas 

Susan Sload Thompson 

Audrey Kellert Yeingst 

E. Michael Yohe 



1963 

Jay S. Berman 
"James A. Blessing 

Eric W. Broadt 

F. Thomas Casey 

Shirley Foehl Chee 

Michael Cordas Jr. 

Donald S. Cornelius 

Robert W. Curtis 

Penelope Stamps DaGrossa 

Barbara A. Deroba 

Fred B. Dunkelberger 

Patricia Estep Dysart 

Jane Beers Epinger 
"Kenneth R. Fish 
"Russell I. Fisher 

John K. Frank Jr. 
"Stephen C. Gettier 

Nancy Jane Good 

Naomi Weaver Grondahl 

Joseph W. Herb 

James H. Herrold 
"Elwood Hippie Jr. 
"Joe W. Kleinbauer 

Sandra Dunkle Klotz 

Peter H. Kuebler 

Miriam Brown Markowitz 

Marjorie Blair Matson 

Clark R. Mosier 
"Carl Marcus Moyer 

Mary Brown Murray 

Cynthia Hoffman Priest 

Sue Houseworth Rose 

Carol Shesler Rowe 

Thomas D. Samuel Jr. 

Anita Ruhling Sapp 
"Irene Etter Schmehl 

Carolyn Moyer Schneider 

Barbara Claffee Schumacher 

Mary Virginia Weatherlow Shelley 

Samuel R. Shirey 



Walter W. Shirk 

Sandra K. Sholley 

Georgiann Brodisch Skinner 

David A. Smith 

Neil R. Smith 

Linda Leach Spillman 

Lynda Dries Strecker 

Kenneth E. linger 
•Rudolph Van der Heil 

H. Nathan Ward 
•Jeffrey G. Whitney 

1964 

Robert C. Aerni 

Alan Bachrach Jr. 

William M. & Carolyn Kurtz Bailey 

Joseph G. Bates 

Richard J. & Gail Hart Biedermann 

Judith A. Bollinger 
*Patricia Cook Brandtf 

Frederick D. Brown 

Dorlene G. Buck 

Doris Hoffman Casey 

Donna Zeilman Chestnut 

Annette Campbell Crickenberger 

Gene H, Dechert 

Barbara Allen Fiscus 

Mary Jane Gelnett 
*William A. Gerkens 

Albert W. Grondahl 

Robert G. Gundaker 

Earl R. Jacobus 
"Grace Simington Karschner 

Pamela J. Kay 

George A. Kirchner 

Judith Rothermel Kosterlitz 

Frank J. Leber 

Judith Tuma Kuebler 

Mary Wingord Lower 

Barry I. Markowitz 

George Mowers 

Kenneth A. Mutze! 
*James B. Norton 

Karen Bond Scala 

David J. Schumacher 

Richard A. & Susan Chapman Seaks 

Carol Knox Seitz 

Lawrence E. Shaffer 

Robert Y. & Pamela Yeager SMar 

James M. Skinner 
*Lawrence A. Skinnerf 

Joseph A. Snyder Jr. 
*Ann Latimer Strate 

James W. Summers 

Kathye Wasson Unglaubf 

Vicki Lawler Yohe 

1965 

Dorothy Woolley Baron 
Charles W. Borgerding Jr.f 
Susan Duerr Borgerdingt 
Stacey L. Bottiger 
•Arthur F. Bowen 
Frances Ray Burks 

E. Lance Cave 
Linda Cole Conine 
Walton R. Cueman 
Lewis H. Darrf 
Ray E. Dice 
Susan L. Evans 
Paul G. Filipek 
George W. Fishel 
Lawrence J. Galley 
Robert A. Good 
Robert K. Hamme 
Cortland M. Hatfield 
Harold J. Hershey 
Mary Lou West Johnson 

•Richard S. Karschner 

Dawn Fife Kinord 

Carol Cox Kirchner 

Peter D. & Carol Ocker Kirk 

Milton M. Kuhn 

Carolyn Robinson Landis 

Carolyn Tweed Leap 

Richard E. Linder 

Victoria S. Long 

Meredith Wright Martin 
•Milton H. Maslin 

Peter L. Motson 
•Seward P. & Karen Boyd Mellon 

Carl F. Miller 
•Wayne W. Miller 

F. David Pennypacker 
'Susan C. Petrie 

Bonnie Bucks Reece 

Eric L. Reichley 

Diane Norcross Samuel 



Steven L. Seitz 

Gaye Wolcott Sheffler 

Donald K. Smith 

Pamela Dick Streamer 

Elizabeth Bunting Strong 

Barbara Evans Summers 

R. Brent Swope 

Jane Campbell Thomas 

Gail L. Tillman 

Alfred M. Unglaubf 

William R, Walker 

Mary Bagenstose Waltman 

Robert N. & Janet Clark Watts 

Gary G. Zerbe 

1966 

Charles L. Bailey Jr. 

Larry D. & Priscilla Clark Bashore 

Leanne Shaw Belletti 

Carol Viertel Beran 
'Herbert G. Boettger 

Georgia Fegley Boyer 

Ann McAuliffe Darrf 

Richard D. & Elizabeth Braun 
Davidson 
•Sue C. Davis 

Janice O'Donnell Ftore 

Wayne H. Fisher 

Linda Carothers Good 

Thomas R. Gresh 

Patricia Laubach Hallman 

Genette A. Henderson 

Ruth E. Keener 

Donald S. King 

Charles N. Lehman 

Susan McAuliffe Lucas 

Edwin M. Markel, Jr. 

Joan L. Meisenhelter 

Stephen D. Melching 

John J, Menapace 

Gary L. Miller 

Joanne Drake Morris 

Barbara Reynolds Nelson 

David C. Newhart 

Richard H. Streamer 

Marilyn Moltu Taylor 

Gretchen Gochnour Thiele 

Carole Summer Ward 

Lois Swartz Yingling 

Nancylee Cranmer Zaucha 

Suzanne Springer Zeok 

1967 

J. Robert Arthur 
Reynold L. Badman 
H. Richard Barley 
Charles S. Bender 
•Virginia M. Biniek 
Robert D. & Beverly Walker Bortz 
Donna Ake Burkholder 
Dwight E. Dickensheets 
Cynthia Culp Fad 
Earl F. & Judith Lloyd Famous 
Patricia Craig Galley 
Barry I. Gehring 
Parren A. Gottshall 
Carolyn Ruocco Grimes 
Maryann Paylor Grube 
Jennifer Hawley Hamme 
Donna Lou Garver Henry 
Barbara Kaufmann Huber 
John D. & Andrea Schumann Keimf 
Linda Kauffman Kirby 
William D. Kramerf 
V. Diane Christensen Lacey 
Donald C. Lindenmuth 
William F. Livengood 
Terry L. March 
Frank D. Marsh 
Alicia Weeks McGivaren 
Gail Spory McPherson 
Nicholas J. Migliaccio 
Robert R. & Carolyn Wahler Miller 
Christine Groth Murow 
Diane Heller Nixon 
Nancy V. Orr 
Lynn E. Persing 
Kenneth R. Sausman Jr. 
Gary R. Seifert 
Marian L. Shatto 
Robert C. Snyder 
Barbara Brown Troutman 
Roger G. VanDeroef 
Sandra Crowl Walker 
Constance A. Walter 
Margaret Shields Weidner 
William H. Wiest 
Paul P. Wild 



Vaughn A. Wolf 
William L. Yingling 
Joan Hoffman Zerbe 

1968 

John W. Arnold 

Dennis M. Baker 

Katharine W. Beard 

Peggy Ann Gilbert Beck 

Susan E. Bishop 
•Harriet Yeager Blank 

Barbara J. Brought 

Elizabeth Ann Charles 
'Samuel D. Clapper 

Richard J. & Marilyn Pierce 
Cromwell 

Nancy Dewsbury 

Gwen Henneforth Fitch 

Lester E. Goodmanf 

Janet Fowler Grey 

Willard M. Grimes 

Samuel J. Halpern 

James P. Howard 

Benjamin L. Jones 

Sally Dries Jones 

Elizabeth Elmer Kaufmann 

J. David Kelley 

Robert J. King 

Lloyd Kleiman Jr. 

Carol Sutcliffe Kramerf 

Barbara Dick Kurzenknabe 

James L. Lubrecht 

Wayne T. & Joanne Romano Lucas 

Ellen Biers Markel 

Brian D. McCartney 

Richard E. & Ellen Rogers Mearns 

John A. Meyer 

Christine Kelly Migliaccio 

Gerald J. Miskar 

Dawn Grigg Mueller 

Johanna Sheese Murray 

Jeffrey L. Noble 

Nancy Lee Oliver 

Richard G. Poinsett 

Sally Gait Riddle 

H. Larry Roberts 
•Charles J. Romberger 

Russell D. Schantz 

Kenneth R. & Betsy Klose Selinger 

Norinne Bailey Spencer, in memory 
of her father Harry J. Bailey 

Richard D. Spotts 
*Ann L. Stauffenberg 
•Richard L. Steinberg 
•Cheryl R. Stickle 

Frederick R. Swavely 

Marsha M. Tamke 

Barbara Leonard Vaccaro 

Pamela A. VanDyke 

Suzanne Yenchko 

1969 

Susan Agoglia 
Carol Smith Arnold 
Keith H. Bance 
Nancy Cary Barr 
Donald O. Bensinger Jr. 
Carlo M. Block 
Barry E. Bowen 
Willard J. Bowen 
Katharine S. Bressler 
John C. Brill 
Daniel M. Corvelyn 
Walter W. Custance 
Peter W. Delin 
Barbara Hitchens DePerro 
David M. Dumeyer 
Thomas C. Eggleston III 
Thomas Etrweiler 
Philip D. Fowler III 
•Martha Imhof Franrz 
Richard W. Grey 
Robert E. Guise 
Fred H. Halt 
Susan Stephan Hill 
Donald A. Hinsdale 
Barry L. Jackson 
Robert O. Jesberg 
Judith Wittosch Kelley 
Margaret Heil King 
Margaret L. Knouse 
Anne Heinbach Lawrence 
Robert B. Leamon 
Sheila A. Mahon 
Holly Ford Marsh 
JoAnn Lester Maucherf 
Virginia Carlson McKenzie 
Robert G. Monahon 



•William A. Musser 
Loren E. Negley 
Dale Jacabsen Noble 
Linda laeger Poinsett 
Lani L. Pyles 
Philamena Quattrocchi 
Robert D. & Beverly Dato Reber 
Nancy Haas Reese 
Diane Renaldo Ritchie 
Edward R. Schmidt 
Richard W. Semke 
Robert X. Spero 
Ertc N. Stein 
Patricia Peltier Stickley 
Nancy Boyer Sutton 
Gregory H. Trautman 
Edward H. Vermillion 
Ronald J. Witko 
Elsbeth H. Wrigley 
Karen Pfleger Zygan 

1970 

Paul W. Bankes 

Gwendolyn A. Baughman 

Martha Barker Blessing 

Kathleen VanOrder Bowen 

Barry L. Boyer 

William D. & laurine Longfield 

Cooke 
Karen Kister Corvelyn 
Henry J. DePerro 
Robert R. Dunn III 
Sue J. Ebling 
Donald H. Fetterolf 
Harriet Burger Griffith 
Dennis K. Hall 
Christian B. Harris 
Robert B. Heinemann 
Jane Schiller Hickeyt 
Robert G. Hochstuhl 
Cheryl A. Huleatte 
Carolyn McGhee Jackson 
Earl F. Keiser Jr. 
Timothy E. Braband '73, in memory 

of Joan H. Keller '70 
Barry R. Klock 
Barbara A. Latsha 
Barry 1. Llewellyn 
Margaret Bottorf Long 
Allen C. Lovell 
Karen Emley Lubrecht 
Michael J. Marcinek 
Kathryn Klee Meyer 
Linda Palmer Miller 
Alan E. Moyer 
James R. Nace 
James C. Packard 
D. Ward Plummer Jr. 
Bonnie J. Shockey 
Marina Sinanoglou 
Thomas B. Snedeker 
Cheryl A. Snyder 
William Q. Stickley Jr. 
G. Lance Williams 
Lynn Fitch Wolfrom 
Donna R. Zierdt 

1971 

Frank L. Altieri 

Donald T. Auld Jr. 

Pearl C. Barabas 
•Thomas N. Berryman 

Nancy Faringer Cressman 

David J. Deak 

Donald H. Dieker 

Karen Kaneen Fetterolf 

Ruth Ann Gintner Fitzpatrick 

John G. Foos 

Cynthia A. Frishkorn 

Signe S. Gates 

Sandra H. Goodenough 

Judy Rechberger Harris 

William L.S. Landes 

Jean McEvoy Llewellyn 

Linda Nansteel Lovell 

Anne Best Lutzf 

Linda Kauffman Moyer 

Charles G. Norbertf 

Karen L. Olson 

C. Neil Petersen 
'Norma McElhaney Romberger 

Linda Haughton Trezise 

1972 

Charlene Moyer Bance 
••Mr. & Mrs. Dale F. Eyster, Elizabeth 
G. Eyster '72 Memorial Fund 



Douglas S. Griese 

Laurie H. Hart 

Louise A. Hower 
*Bruce D. Kirkf 

Linda B. Kline 

Debra A. Plunkett 
*Warren E. Ries 

A. Rebecca Schumacher 

Dennis H. Smith Jr. 

Steven L. Thornburg 

Pamela Bressler Williams 

1973 

Jean Renee Boyer 
Dennis G. Mosebey 
Allison Butts Smith 

1975 

Richard G. Randazzot 

PARENTS AND FRIENDS 

Mr. & Mrs. George Adams 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent F. Aiello 
"Mrs. Caude G. Aikens 
**C. Thomas Aikens 

Olga Akalski 
*Myrl E. Alexander hc'72 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark T. Ailing 

J. Samuel Allison 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Anderson 

Sidney Apfelbaum 
**John A. Apple hc'64 
"John B. Apple 

George A. Atkinson 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Ayres 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Baar 

Mr. & Mrs. James Baglin 
'Harrison W. Bance 
*Jane F. Barlow h'60 

Helen M. Barnabic 

Mr. & Mrs. Emil G. Barran 

Mr. & Mrs. James S. Bates 
"John H. Baum hc'71 

Robert C. Bealor 

Mr. & Mrs. James Bechtel 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Bechtold 
*W. L. Becker 

Mr. & Mrs. John Belletti 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren H. Bellis 

John Benincasa Jr. 

George H. Berkheimer hc'51 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Bernegger 

Lillian S. Bernmger 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Berti 

Dr. & Mrs. Harold L. Bess 

James A. Bewley 

Arif Biosevas 

Fred O. Bird 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Blatt 

John C. Bleazey 

Mr. & Mrs. R. H. Blend 

Robert Bogenrief 

Ralph W. Bohner 

Peter Bolick Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. George Bookhout Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome Boryea 
**Raymond C. Bowen 

T. I. Bowen 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Bower 
'Robert F. Bower 

Robert L. Bradford h'69 
*J. Stephen Bremer 

Florence R. Brenneman 

Mr. & Mrs. Al Brigante 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert R. Brinkman 

Alan B. Britton 

Edna T. Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Brubaker Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Bucklar 
"Mr. & Mrs. Douglas E. Buehlert 
"William R. Burchfield 

William Burdick 

Albert R. Burkhardt 

C. Robert Burns 
"Dr. & Mrs. Leonard F. Bush hc'70 

Mr. & Mrs. Germain Bykowsky 

Nancy A. Cairns h'69 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Campbell 

Lewis K. Carey 

Edna L. Carichner 

Michael. Carlini 

Gilbert J. Carr 

Russell H. Carrier 

John J. Casey Jr. 

Michael Casso 

Mr. & Mrs. George Chapman Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Elmer L. Chester 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Chirco 



MATCHING CONTRIBUTORS 

The University wishes to recognize these companies' match- 
ing gifts of employees to Susquehanna University for the 
period July 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973. Corporate 
Matching Gift Programs provide a vital source of funds for 
higher education and serve to double the value of the em- 
ployee's donation. Please check to see if your employer is 
one of more than 450 with Matching Gift Programs. 



Airco, Inc. 

Alcoa Foundation 
* Al I is Chalmers Manufacturing Co. 

Armstrong Cork Co. 

Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
'Borg Warner Corp. 

Carpenter Steel Foundation 
'Chase Manhattan Bank 

Chicopee Manufacturing Co. 

Dun & Brodstreet Group Cos. 

Esso Education Foundation 
'Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
*Ford Motor Co. 
'General Foods Corp. 

W.T. Grant Co. 
"Gulf Oil Corp. 
'Hershey Foods Corp. 

International Business Machines 

International Tel. & Tel. Corp. 

Johnson & Johnson 
The Koppers Foundation 

Mack Trucks. Inc. 
"McGraw- Edison Co. 
'McGraw Hilt, Inc. 

Mellon National Bank & Trust Co. 

Merck Co. Foundation 



John G. Christopher 

Mr. & Mrs. Roger D. Chubb 
'Stanley Ciszak 

Donald Clark 

Claire Clarey 

John J. Geary 

Rose A. Cleary 

C. Peter Clute 
*Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Cohn 

Charles E. Cole 

Mrs. Robert F. Collins 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Comfort 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip R. Cook 

John H. Coon Jr. 
'Samuel Coroniti 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Dalton 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Dauber 

Robert A. Davidson 

S. Leonard Davidson 
*Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Davis Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William Debnarik 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Deck 
*Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Degenstein 

Mr. & Mrs. Carlo Degrassi 
'Howard E. DeMott h'54 

Patrick F. Denard 

Nona M. Diehl hc'49 

Irene Dietz 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin Diggins Jr. 

Robert B. Dodd 

Thomas S. Dodge h'67 

Anthony J. D'Onofrio 

Kenneth Dorman 

Mr. & Mrs. Myron Downs 

Merle D. Dubs 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Duncanf 

Mr. & Mrs. William Dunstan 

James L. Eckman 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Egbert 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Eletto 
'Phyllis Ellis 

Mr. & Mrs. G.F. Elser 

William Emanuel 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph A. Enders 

Kenneth Erdman 

George H. Erickson 
*Dr. & Mrs. Roland A. Erickson 

hcVOt 
'Donald H. & Margaret Snyder 
Ernst h'65 

Robert I. Eschelman 

Henrietta I. Evans 



"Milton Bradley Co. 

Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing 
Co. 

Montgomery Ward & Co. 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. 

Nationwide Insurance Co. 

Olin Corp. 
'Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. 
'Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 

Price Waterhouse & Co. 

Prudential Insurance Co. of 
America 
'Reader's Digest 
'Rohm & Haas Co. 

Richardson Merrell, Inc. 
"Schering Corp. 

SCM Corp. 
"Scott Paper Co. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
*Sperry & Hutchison Co. 

Squibb Beech-Nut, Inc. 
'Stackpole Carbon Co. 

Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. 
'Textron, inc. 

United Illuminating Co. 
'United States Trust Co. of N.Y. 




"Mr. & Mrs. Dale Eyster 
"Mrs. Mary Eyster 

Douglas A. Falkner 

John G. Faron Jr. 

Terence G. Paul 
"William O. Faylor Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Ferraro 

Ruth Fetherolf 
'Dr. & Mrs. Robert Fexa 

Robert Filbey 

Stanley Filer 

Mr. & Mrs. David J. Fisher 
"Mrs. Nelson Fisher 
*Dr. & Mrs. Shelton Fisher hc'68f 

Atvin Fishman 

Kenneth O. Fladmark h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. George Fleming 

Robert S. Fleming 

Foster G. Fletcher h'68 
'Frank W. Fletcher 

Roger W. Flemmens 

Mr. & Mrs. Ivan L. Forman 

George W. Freeze 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Friedman 
'Leo Friedman (deceased) 

J. Homer Frymoyer 

Robert Gallagher 

William C. Garro 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Gaul Jr. 

William Gavrich Sr. 

James C. Gehris 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Gent Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Glff Jr. 
*Dr. & Mrs. Euell T. Gibbons hc'72 

Mr. & Mrs. Sid Gibelman 

The Rev. & Mrs. Boyd Gibson 
"Gynith C. Giffin h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl K. Gift 
*Russell W. Gilbert h'37 

Mr. & Mrs. William Gildersleeve 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Oil I in 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Glenney 

Gerald Goerke 
"Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Goetze 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Goldberg 

Mrs. Mary M. Goodenow 

Robert M. Goodspeed 

Mr. & Mrs. Byron Gordon 

Gerald R. Gordon h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. James Graham 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard F. Graham 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Grant 

Mr. & Mrs. Allen B. Graybill 



Fred A. Grosse h'67 

Glenn P. Grove 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Groves 
'Wallace J. Growney 

Mr. & Mrs. John Guevrekian 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Guiliano 

Mr. & Mrs. James Gushue 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Haas 

Mr. & Mrs. Preston Hadley 

Mr. &. Mrs. William R. Haines 

Edward G. Hansberry 
"George F. Harkins hc'71 

William J. Harper 

James P. Harrah 
"Carol Jensen Harrison 

Carol W. Hartley 

William Hastedt 

Mr. & Mrs. F. R. Hauser 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Hovrllko 

Elim Heggs Jr. 

Kenneth Heiser 

The Rev. & Mrs. Harold Helfrich 

Mr. & Mrs. Noel Hellinger 

James & Candace Ridington 
Herb h'69 

Lloyd Herdle 

Kenneth Hess 

Henry S. Hesse 

O.H. Hewit Ml 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Heyman 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl R. Hicks 

Charles A. Highsmith 

Agnes Jean Hill 

The Rev. & Mrs. John C. Hinsch 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hoffmann 

Mr. & Mrs. William S. Holcombe 

H. Louis Horner Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis G. Hough 

Robert C. Houston 
"Orlando W. Houts 

James Hubler 

Mr. 8. Mrs. Robert M. Hunt 

Charles J. Igoe h'69 

Mr. & Mrs. George W. Ingenbrandt 

Horace Ingram 

Betty Isaacs 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Isaksen 

Mr. & Mrs. William Jacobus 
**Mr. & Mrs. William A. James Jr. 

Martin Janes 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry E. Januszka 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick H. Jarrett 

Mr. & Mrs. Julian Jarrett 

Thomas R. Jeffrey 

Mr. & Mrs. Erick A. Johnson 

Anna Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Roger M. Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Russell L. Jones 

G.V. Kodenbach 

Mr. & Mrs. Kaitreider 
'Hilda Karniol h'64 

Margaret A. Keeler 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kellerman 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Kerlin Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Deri Kieffer 

Albert W. Kimball 

Mr. & Mrs. George J. Kimmerer 
*Mr. & Mrs. Bradley D. Kirk 

Jan A. Kisza 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Klein 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond J. Kline 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Kolody 

David Korner 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Koziar 

William H. Kozlowski 
*Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Krahmer h'67 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Kramm 

Margaret J. Krapf 

Dr. & Mrs. Emil Kratzman 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl R. Kreger 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Kromes 

Mr. & Mrs. Somuel Kuba 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles S. Kunes 

Mr.& Mrs. Raymond Kurtzke 
"Eleanor Robison Landes h'60 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Lang Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Landers 

John P. Landis 

Kermit L. LaRose 

Mr. & Mrs. James Lawrence 

Virginia G. Lawser 

Doris F. Leese 

Ernest A. Leffler 

Rolla E. Lehman II 
"Richard C. Leib 

Robert E. Leonard 

Andrew Lesanski 



lit 



Mitchell 
Mitchell 



Mr. & Mrs. Howard L. Letts 

Clyde B. Lindsley 

Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Livengood 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Limongello 

Mr. & Mrs. George Lines 

Donald Littlejohn 
•Ralph W. Loew hc'72 

Samuel Long 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Longenberger 

Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin Lotz hc'61 

Charles E. Lyle h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles MacKinney 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. McNamara 

George O. Machlan 

Dr. & Mrs. William Mogill 
*John S. Magrane 

Dorothy W. Mahoney 

Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth Mailloux h'62 
*Donald C. Malcolm 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Mangle 

Charles Mansir 

Stephen E. Marcinek 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Marecek 

Mr. & Mrs. David H. Marshall 

Joseph A. Martin 

Doris Martinet 

J. Mascolo Jr. 

Roy Mathias 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Mattern 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene McCurdy 

Thomas McGroth h'69 
•Marian McKechnie 

Mr. & Mrs. George McKinnell 

Mary E. McLane 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Meany 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Melchiori 

Mrs. F.C. Mildola 

Mr. & Mrs. Gustave Michelson 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Miller 

Reuben Miller 

Ruth C. Miller 

Robert J. Miller 

George W. Minard 

Maria Miscavage 

Mr. & Mrs. William 

Mr. & Mrs. Jackson 

Daniel K. Morgan 

Mr. & Mrs. Gordon V. Moyer 

James H. Murdock 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Murray Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Floyd Mutchler 
*Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Nalepa 

Bruce L. Nary h'67 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Neiser 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Newson Jr. 

Frederick Nolte 

Robert E. Nylund h'69 

Alice O'Malley 

Joseph O'Neill 

Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph Ostermueller 

Martin A. Ostrow 

Walter E. Owensf 

Anthony Pagnotti 

David L. Painter 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald I. Parsels 

Roy E. Poules 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Pecha 

Frank M. Petre Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ferdinand P. Petrie 

Anna Pivarnik 

Mr. & Mrs. William Plasttno 
•Dorothy B. Porter hc71 
•Dr. & Mrs. Neil H. Potter 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Powers 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Powers 

Leonard J. Pratz 

Anton Pritsch 
*Mr. & Mrs. Truman Purdy 
•Mr. & Mrs. Saul Putterman 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Quinn 

Joan Rager 

Joseph Raho 

Frances Rambo 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Randazzo 

Ida W. Rattelman 

Melvin Rauss 
'Joseph L. Ray h'67 

John M. Reode III h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. John Redpath 
•Robert U. Redpath 

James Reed 

Mr. & Mrs. James Reich 

Richard A. Reiland 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Reichenbach 
'Otto Reimherr 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter T. Reinhardt 

Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy Rescigno 



'Harold H. Reuning 
'Wilhelm Reuning 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Rice 

Verna Richards 

George Richenaker 

Mr. & Mrs. James Rideout 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Riley 

Anne Rispoli 
'Charles W. Ritter 

Richard Ritter 

William Robinson 

Carl E. Roemer 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph C. Rohrer 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Roth 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Roth 
"Henry W. Rozenberg hc'73 

Raymond J. Ruff 

Mrs. Robert T. Rungee 

Mr. & Mrs. S. H. Runyon 

Joyce Sauers 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick W. Schaefer 

Betty B. Schantz 

Mr. & Mrs. David S. Schirm 

Rose Marie Schluter 

Mrs. Edgar Schmidt 

Dr. & Mrs. Jacob Schnifman 

Harry M. Schoenly 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Scholl 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Schott 

Mr. & Mrs. John Schuessler 

Glenn P. Schwalm 

Valentine Schwartz 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren S. Search Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Delbert Seifert 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Selman 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Senger 

Evonne Severinsen 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Shatto Jr. 
'Paul C. Shatto Sr. 

Dorothy R. Shaulis 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Shaw 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Sheaffer 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Sherman 

John R. Shetzley 

Richard Shirley 

George Shroyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl Sims 

Mr. & Mrs. William Slattery 

Andrew Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Smith 

John William Smith 

Lawrence Smith 

Lewis L. Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas S. Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. William Smith 

B. Rex Snyder 

Mr. & Mrs. Darwin Snyder 

F. Thomas Snyder 

Gerald Snyder 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Somerfield 

Edward M. Sosik 

Mr. & Mrs. Norton Spence 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Spencer 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Stoker 
•Albert P. Stauderman hc'73 

Ruth Milter Steese hc'33 
•James B. Steffy 
•Catherine E. Steltz h'68 

C.E. Stevens Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Stine Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. George Storey 

Stewart Strausbaugh 

Fredrica H, Stringfellow 

Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm Strunk 

Mr. & Mrs. Don Stryffeler 

Mrs. Allen Stuart 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Gordon Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas O. Sweet 

Helen K. Szwed 

Mary H. Tackack 

Mr. & Mrs. George R.F. Tamke h'67 
'Marie K. Tamke 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Thomas 

Mr. & Mrs. John Thomas 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilfiam Thomas 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Timmons 

John Tolsma 

Mr. & Mrs. Ladislaus Topor 
'Bertha S. Townsend h'34 

Martin L. Tozer hc'54 

Mr. & Mrs. John Trojan 
'Dr. & Mrs. Whitney M. Trousdale 
*S.P. Turnbach 

George T. Turnbull 

Mary J. Turner 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Urbanczyk 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence B. Utter 

Mrs. Walter S. Van Poyck 



Mr. & Mrs. Peter Varvaris 

Mr. & Mrs. Luciano E. Verruso 

Mr. & Mrs. Eric Vessey 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Von Heyn 

Stanley Von Lehn 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore F. Voss Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Waddon 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Wagenseil 

Bruce S. Wagenseller 

Betty W. Wagner 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Waldron 

Mr. & Mrs. John Walker 
"Mr. & Mrs. Charles Wall Sr. 

Mr. &. Mrs. Lucas Walton 
•'Mr. & Mrs. Norman E. Walz h'67 
"Alan C. Warehime 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond 
Wasserbach Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert R. Waters 
'Howard H. Weaner Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ellsworth Weanf 

Florence Weaver 
**Dr. & Mrs. Gustave W. Weber h'64 
"Robert F. Weis 
•'Sigfried Weis 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul S. Welch 

Floyd B. Wells 

George Wells Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Robert Wells 

Howard Wells Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. Welsh 

Lynn Wheeland 

Mr. & Mrs. James White 
**Mr. & Mrs. Homer W. Wieder Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. A. B. Wiley Jr. 
•Elizabeth Wiley h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry H. Wiley 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Williams 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Williams 

Mr. & Mrs. James Wilson 

Paul F. Wilson 

Lyman C. Wilson 

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Wise 
*Mr. & Mrs. E.E. Wissinger 

Thomas R. Wissinger 

Rudolf A. Wolckenhauer 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerhard Wolf 

Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Wolfgang 

Hugh Woods 

William A. Wray 

Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Wright 
•Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Wyattf 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Yeager 

William Yoder 

Bernard Jackson 

Eugene R. Zehner 
*Efrem Zimbalist Jr. hc'66 

Dr. & Mrs. Albert Zimmer 

Robert Zimmerman 

CORPORATIONS AND 
FOUNDATIONS 

**Aetna Life & Casualty Co. 
Airco, Inc. 
Alcoa Foundation 
"Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. 
••AMP, Inc. 

Armstrong Cork Co. 
*Beck Electric Co. 
•Becker Motors, Inc. 

Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
*Big Boy Auto Parts, Inc. 
*Borg Warner Corp. 
**Bottiger & Stuck 

Bulova Watch Co. Foundation 
•'Butter Krust Baking Co. Inc. 
"Carpenter Steel Foundation 
•Chase Manhattan Bank 
Chicopee Manufacturing Co. 
••Continental Telephone Co. 
"The Daily Item 
**J.C. Decker Co. 

Dun & Bradstreet Group Cos. 
**Ernst & Ernst 

Esso Education Foundation 
"S.H. Evert Co. 
"Faylor-Middlecreek, Inc. 
"Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
"First National Trust Bank 

*Ford Motor Co. 
"Foundation for Independent 
Colleges 
'General Foods Corp. 
'Gerber Baby Foods 
••Albert F. Goetze Foundation 

W.T. Grant Co. 
••Grit Publishing Co. 
"Gulf Oil Corp. 



"Hagedorn Fund 
"Hanover Brands Inc. 
"Hershey Foods Corp. 
'Household Finance Corp. 
International Business Machines 
International Tel. & Tel. Corp. 
•Johnson & Johnson 
'Keller Marine 
The Koppers Foundation 
"Lindback Foundation 

*The Lyons Shop 
"Mary Macintosh Services 

Mack Trucks. Inc. 
••Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. 
'McGraw -Edison Co. 
"McGraw Hill, Inc. 
Mellon National Bank & Trust Co. 
"Merck Co. Foundation 
•'Milton Bradley Co. 
**Milton Shoe Manufacturing Co. 
Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing 

Co. 
Montgomery Ward & Co. 
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. 
•'National Science Foundation 
'Nationwide Insurance Co. 
'Old Trail Fabric Center 

Olin Corp. 
*Ott Packagings. Inc. 
"Ottaway Foundation 

*Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. 
"Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 
•Phillips Fuel Co. 
'Presser Foundation 
Price Waterhouse & Co. 
Prudential Insurance Co. of 
America 
"Purdy Insurance Co.f 
•Reader's Digest 
*Rohm & Haas Co. 
Richardson Merrell, Inc. 
"Schering Corp. 

SCM Corp. 
"Sears Roebuck Foundation 

•Selinsgrove Fuel Co. 
**L.B. Smith, Inc. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
•'Snyder County Trust Co. 
"Specialty Bakers 
'Sperry & Hutchison Co. 
•Squibb Beech -Nut. Inc. 
'Stackpole Carbon Co. 
"Sunbury Textile Co. 
**Swineford National Bank 

Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. 
'Textron, Inc. 
"TRW Foundation 

United Illuminating Co. 
••United States Trust Co. of N.Y. 

•Walnut Acres Foundation 
* 'Margaret L. Wendt Foundation 
"Jacob C. Winter Foundation 
"Wood-Metal Industries 

CHURCHES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

•'Aid Association for Lutherans 
"Appalachian Regional Commission 
"Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg, 

Campaign for Human Development 
* 'Central Pennsylvania Synod, 
Lutheran Church in America 
Class of 1969 
Class of 1970 

Columbia Montour Health Service, 
Inc. 
••Department of Health, Education & 

Welfare 
"Evangelical Lutheran Church of the 

Holy Trinity, Lancaster 
"First Lutheran Church, Mifflinburg 
"Lutheran Church in America 
•'Lutheran Brotherhood 
*St. John's Lutheran Church, 

Snydertown 
*St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, 

York 
*St. Peter's Lutheran Church, 
Lancaster 
•'Sunbury Kiwanis Club 
"Sunbury Rotary Club 

Susquehanna University Student 
Government 
"Susquehanna University Women's 

Auxiliary 
"Trinity Lutheran Church, Johnstown 
'Zion Lutheran Church Men's Bible 

Class, Harrisburg 
•Zion Lutheran Church, Johnstown 




Fifteen Years — A Tribute 



Gustave W. Weber will complete 15 years as President of 
Susquehanna University next February 1. His is already 
the fourth longest tenure of all Susquehanna's 1 1 chief 
executives and one of the two or three longest of current 
Lutheran college presidents in the U.S. There is no need to 
recount Dr. Weber's leadership and accomplishments here 
for they have been spread upon the pages of the Alumnus 
issue by issue as they happened, and the results are amply 
evident in this year's Report. 

But it does seem appropriate to pause and pay a brief 
tribute to Weber the man, who has meant so much to 
thousands of University students, alumni, and others . . . 
the aggressive Weber, whose first pronouncement after 
settling himself at his new desk was that little Susquehanna 
was going to be first-rate in everything it did, and the 
practical Weber who recognized that it could nevertheless 
not attempt to be all things to everyone . . . the entertaining 
Weber who has a story for every occasion . . . the enthusi- 
astic Weber who has traveled far and wide to be where 
Susquehannans are . . . the athletic Weber who won nine 
letters in college, still plays a mean set of tennis, and filled 
in as football coach for two games some years ago . . . the 
compassionate Weber whose pastoral concern and help 
extends into the lives of students, parents, staff and alumni 
alike ... the Weber who is always available, always inter- 
ested, always involved. 

He's written many a speech, conducted many a meet- 
ing, heard many a concert, seen many a game, and con- 
ferred many a degree — including honoraries upon such 
Senators as Scott and Clark . . . Churchmen as Fry, Mar- 
shall, and Krol . . . Governors as Scranton and Shaffer 
. . . artists and entertainers as Zimbalist. 

He observed his fifth anniversary at Susquehanna at a 
Chapel Service in Seibert Hall and his tenth at a Campus 
Center dinner where his whole family was present and 
gathered afterward at Pine Lawn (below). 

Have a Happy 15th, Dr. Weber. We're very glad 
you've been around! 




FALL 1973 



23 



A knowledgeable alumnus 
gives serious thought to . . 



Financial Problems 
In Higher Education 

by LAWRENCE M. ISAACS '43 



The national media have outlined the broad scope of 
the financial crisis that engulfs higher education. Alum- 
ni should be concerned! The threat is real and the 
dimension of the problem transcends the college itself to 
affect alumni, parents and others interested in the future 
of higher education. College administrators and Board 
members are concerned as educational costs soar and in- 
flation impedes development in many critical areas; 
parents of students are concerned as they are asked to 
share a greater burden of this proliferating expense; 
alumni are concerned and often annoyed with the ap- 
peals from Alma Mater for financial support that tend 
to increase in frequency and become more pleading in 
nature. It has been indicated, "the trouble is not limited 
to a few institutions. Nor does it affect only one or two 
types of institutions. Large colleges, small colleges, state 
supported and privately supported, the problem faces 
them all." 

Indeed, then, the problem of immediate concern to 
Susquehanna alumni may seem even more acute in view 
of the college's limited financial resources and our in- 
ability by nature to attract large grants for graduate 
work and research projects. On second glance, however, 
Susquehanna's size and modest means may prove an ad- 
vantage in planning a future of significant worth in 
higher education. The reader then asks the penetrating 
question: If the well endowed institutions like those in 
the Ivy League face annual operating deficits and pro- 
gram cut-backs, how can the Susquehannas and other 
small liberal arts colleges hope to survive the pressures 
during the years immediately ahead? Since our needs are 
less complex than most larger institutions, our budget 
has remained balanced through prudent fiscal manage- 




Mr. Isaacs, Development Committee chairman 
for the Susquehanna University Board of 
Directors, is vice president of the A Ms- 
Chalmers Manufacturing Corporation and lives 
in Fox Point, Wis. He previously held high 
offices in Bethlehem Steel and RCA. A 
football quarterback as an undergraduate, he 
is married to the former Louise Kresge '45. 



24 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ment. Our commitment to the undergraduate has been 
reaffirmed and since teaching the undergraduate is Sus- 
quehanna's sole obligation, priorities can be more easily 
established and made more flexible in nature. 

One concerned with the operations of a small col- 
lege like Susquehanna must remain essentially op- 
timistic. It is our nature to do so and would be defeatist 
to do otherwise. The small private colleges have survived 
crises in the past, and it would seem realistic to project 
the view that those dedicated to their task can again 
survive this current crisis. If Susquehanna does not 
survive as a private liberal arts college, it will be through 
default, with only the college itself to blame. Thus, an 
analysis of the situation as it pertains to Susquehanna 
may be helpful in outlining why this small college can 
and must remain a force in higher education during the 
years ahead. To achieve this, Susquehanna must chart a 
course thoroughly, realize its limitations, and give pri- 
ority to its stated objectives. 

In my role as chairman of the Development Com- 
mittee of the Board of Directors, I believe the concept 
of total University development implies the mobilization 
of the various University constituencies in support of the 
institution's objectives and goals. The success of any 
University program is predicated on that institution's 
ability to, a) formulate meaningful educational ob- 
jectives which have substance and which can be in- 
terpreted as the commitment of the University to higher 
education, b) translate these objectives into viable 
educational programs which can be realistically per- 
ceived by our various publics and, c) generate enthu- 
siasm and support for such objectives and programs 
among faculty, staff, Board members, alumni and 
friends. Anything short of meeting these three basic 
institutional objectives means sacrificing proportionately 
the success and support of the development program. 

In this day and age it should be emphasized that 
those institutions remaining strong are the ones 
cognizant of the need to explore in depth the reasons for 
their existence and to outline objectively plans for the 
future. The key factor here is a willingness to be realistic 
in developing the potential of the institution and to take 
prudent risks in introducing new and innovative educa- 
tional programs. It would seem to me that only those in- 
stitutions willing to accept change as a way of life and 
gearing themselves for change will be able to attract the 
attention necessary to survive. 

FUTURE PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS 

It may follow, then, that in outlining future pro- 
grams for Susquehanna the following must be kept in 
mind: First, it must be realized that there are certain 
financial limits within which Susquehanna must plan an 
educational program. With an endowment of about $2 
million, the University's resources must be considered 
modest in relation to many more wealthy institutions. 
An operating budget of some $4.9 million further 
defines the limits within which Susquehanna can 



operate. While modest, these resources can be sufficient 
to allow the University to do a good job and to compete 
for undergraduate students, assuming that objectives are 
defined and priority is given to what is important educa- 
tionally. 

Second, the role of planning and evaluation must 
be brought to education just as these are cardinal con- 
cepts in business. Susquehanna's Long-Range Planning 
Committee, comprised of faculty, administration and 
students, submitted an initial report four years ago. The 
importance of a long-range plan and its influence on in- 
stitutional aims and objectives influence all elements of 
operation — ■ enrollment, budget, programs, fund-raising. 
As a result, objectives must be set in accordance with 
the realistic potential of the best contribution that the 
institution can make to higher education. Such a com- 
mittee's awareness of trends in higher education must be 
understood. Programs should be devised which will ef- 
fectively utilize the resources of the University and 
result in a greater productivity of both staff and 
facilities. Certain trends would seem to indicate that 
both productivity and accountability will be key words 
in higher education during the latter part of the 1970s. 

While those attuned to business speak of pro- 
ductivity in a classical sense and as a means of offsetting 
inflation and lowering the per-unit cost of production, 
one wonders if the same yardstick can be applied with 
corresponding results in education. The answer defies a 
simple solution, since the quality of the educational prod- 
uct is not easily measured in terms of dollars and cents. 
How, for example, can one realistically measure in 
dollars the intangible impact of the intimate 
faculty/student relationship on the small-college cam- 
pus? The challenge here is to avoid production line 
economies that can jeopardize educational quality but, 
at the same time, be alert to new teaching techniques 
and programs which bring economies while protecting 
against any deterioration in educational quality. It is 
therefore incumbent upon faculty and staff to evaluate 
new methods and techniques for presenting material, 
and in this regard they should be held accountable for 
their performance. 

For these reasons, planning is important and it is 
hoped that the Long-Range Planning Committee can 
continue to play an increasingly more prominent role in 
the University's development. It is important to note 
that recommendations already received by the Board 
from the Long-Range Planning group under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Howard DeMott, professor of biology, have 
been implemented by the Board. Such recommendations 
include: an enrollment of 1400, establishing budget 
guidelines and priorities, evaluating the need for an ex- 
panded library, and presenting a plan for curriculum 
revision. The involvement of faculty, staff and students 
in the planning process becomes more acute as the 
necessity arises to review present programs and consider 
new opportunities. In short, the function of planning 
must be pursued aggressively to the point where it has 



FALL 1973 



25 



meaning and validity in determining limits and ob- 
jectives. Planning must be campuswide in scope! 

Third, the small college must seek out new avenues 
of support from its constituents. Communication, a key 
word so often heard, yet misunderstood, continues as a 
primary ingredient in success. Simply to communicate 
well will not bring increased support, since the programs 
and objectives that one communicates to alumni and 
friends are the determinant factors upon which 
philanthropic decisions are based. Thus, the key is to of- 
fer a program worthy of support and then set out to 
make certain all constituents understand this program. 
To assure financial stability, our goals must stimulate 
more alumni to participate in the affairs of Sus- 
quehanna, and we would hope that the percentage of 
alumni giving annual support to Susquehanna can dou- 
ble to 50 percent over the next several years. Indeed it 
must, if we are to remain a viable institution! 

Certainly it should be no embarrassment to say that 
Susquehanna makes no claim of having achieved 
"academic excellence." The University is not sufficiently 
endowed with resources to carry on elaborate research 
or graduate programs; nor should this be the 
University's function, since such tasks should best be 
left to the larger institutions. To attempt such programs 
in any form would be to dilute the educational product 
at the expense of the undergraduate. Realizing this, most 
feel that Susquehanna should remain a college of con- 
trolled size where emphasis is placed on the un- 
dergraduate and on his or her needs. Teaching is para- 
mount, and the continued ability of the professor to 
stimulate students will be the key to Susquehanna's suc- 
cess in future years. The Board of Directors and ad- 
ministration can help provide facilities, equipment and 
other support elements, but only the teacher can provide 
the student with an enthusiastic learning experience. 

CURRENT ACHIEVEMENTS 

Relevant teaching implies an awareness of new and 
modern techniques and a willingness to engender pro- 
grams of interest to students. Believing in the need to be 
alert to new programs, the University has attempted to 
foster a climate in which faculty can experiment with 
new ideas and modes of education. The establishment in 
1970 of an Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies Pro- 
gram with an emphasis on utilizing the location of the 
University in a rural area to provide field work ex- 
perience for students is a case in point. Transcending 
departmental lines, the program provides science majors 
with an opportunity to combine study in their major 
fields with an ecologic perspective. This program has 
received wide recognition and attracted over $300,000 in 
outside support, most notably from the National Science 
Foundation. 

The desire for off-campus learning experiences by 
many students has prompted Susquehanna to establish 
internship programs in disciplines such as psychology, 
sociology, computer science, accounting, business, and 



biology. Here a student is able to supplement his 
classroom education with a supervised internship ex- 
perience in a vocationally allied field. (How much better 
prepared many of us would have been had we had the 
opportunity to "test" our vocational interests as part of 
our undergraduate education!) Even though this ex- 
perience is "external," the role of the teacher is critical 
in designing an internship that supplements the 
classroom work. If a student is to spend ten weeks of 
his undergraduate time off the campus, the faculty 
member must tailor an individual work-study experience 
that warrants academic credit. With the emerging trend 
toward more off-campus and career experiences, the 
professor is challenged to find ways to provide such 
opportunities and to make the educational experience 
even more stimulating for students. These points tend 
to emphasize the individualistic nature of today's edu- 
cation and the added burden of responsibility on faculty 
and staff to develop sound programs. 

What has been accomplished in recent years at Sus- 
quehanna has been planned. The Development Com- 
mittee of the Board recognizes the contribution of the 
Long-Range Planning Committee and gives approval to 
its efforts. In authorizing the recently concluded capital 
campaign, the directors gave emphasis to two pressing 
requirements as outlined in the long-range plan: the 
need for new library facilities and the need for en- 
dowment. Our success in generating subscriptions of 
over $2 million for this campaign leads us to believe that 
some success is being made in effectively com- 
municating the University's objectives and programs to 
our constituents. As a result of the campaign and the 
gifts from over 1500 alumni and friends, more than 
$500,000 has been added to endowment and we can 
look forward to the completion of an expanded and 
modernized library this winter. 

The planning process, however, does not end here. 
Other important needs are currently under evaluation by 
the Board of Directors. It is safe to say that, with the ex- 
ception of the need for expanded physical education 
facilities, the future emphasis will shift from buildings to 
programs and other more intangible but equally im- 
portant matters. Primary emphasis will be given to 
elevating faculty salaries in an effort to remain com- 
petitive in the marketplace. Additional consideration will 
be given to introducing new and vital programs such as 
those outlined earlier in this report, and the overall goal 
is to provide a more effective atmosphere for achieving 
the educational goals of the University. 

Emphasis will be on change — not change for its 
sake alone, but calculated changes that will bring greater 
effectiveness to the educational program. Realizing its 
potential, Susquehanna gears itself to meeting the 
demands of the future and effectively communicating its 
programs to alumni and friends. Hopefully, more alum- 
ni will assist the University in meeting this challenge, 
since, after all. all of us have much to gain by sharing in 
Susquehanna's success. 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



I 

r 




Many Honored at Opening Convocation 




Opening Convocation on September 9 marked the beginning 
of Susquehanna's 116th year. In the absence of President 
Weber — who was speaking and receiving an honorary 
Litt.D. at Thiel College— Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35, 
vice chairman of the SU Board, presided. Above: 
honorary degree recipients Krister Stendahl, dean of 
the Harvard Divinity School, LL.D., and Mary Weimer 
Moffitt '28, professor of education at Queens College, 
Pd.D., pose with Shobert. At left: Mrs. Frances MacCuish, 
director of placement, is given the Wilkinson Award for 
Administrative Excellence and Stanley B. Williams, 
assistant professor of economics, is named Professor of 
the Year by Rick Walker '74, president of the Interfrater- 
nity Council. Karen Ann Havrilko '74 of Shenandoah, Pa. 
received the Lindback Award as a student of great promise 
to become a valuable citizen, Jerry S. Bassett '75 of 
Danville, Pa. won the Stine-Robison Mathematical Prize, 
and 142 students were named University Scholars. Below: 
New Testament scholar Stendahl, who delivered the Convoca- 
tion Address, relaxes during a dialog with students. 




FALL 1973 



27 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'31 

Reno S. Knouse, professor of 
distributive education at the School of 
Education, State University of New 
York at Albany, was honored as Man 
of the Year by Epsilon Delta Epsilon, 
national honorary fraternity in 
distributive education. The award, 
presented "in recognition of outstand- 
ing leadership and service in the 
field of distributive education," was 
made at a testimonial dinner at 
Temple University. 

'32 

Elizabeth Charles Wetzel was 
honored by her colleagues upon her 
retirement as a teacher in the Mid- 
dleburg (Pa.) Elementary School. 

'35 

The Rev. Kenneth R. Anderson 
retired as Protestant chaplain at the 
State Correctional Institution at 
Rockview, near Bellefonte, Pa. A 
graduate of the Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Philadelphia, he 
established a mission in that city and 
then served pastorates in Pottstown 
and Mechanicsburg. After 3V4 years 
at the State Correctonal Institution at 
Camp Hill, he went to Rockview in 
1955. His wife is the former Martha 
Gessner '32 and a daughter is 
Genevieve Anderson Long x'62. 
Chaplain and Mrs. Anderson make 
their home with a granddaughter in 
Centre Hall. 

'36 

Dr. H. Vernon Ferster, chairman of 
the Department of Behavioral 
Studies, State University College at 
Buffalo, N.Y., and his wife, the 
former Fern Zechman x'40, visited in 
Germany this summer with Ernst 
Mahr x'36 who, as a student at the 
University of Giessen, exchanged with 
Erie I. Shobert '35 during 1935-36. 
Mahr is now Studien Direktor in 
charge of personnel for the schools of 
the city of Ingelheim am Rhein and 
would like to hear from Sus- 
quehannans who remember him. He 
and his wife, Helen, have four 



children. Address: Ernst Mahr, Stu- 
dien Direktor, 6507 Ingelheim am 
Rhein, Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 62, 
Germany. 

'37 

The Rev. Woodrow J. Klinger 
pastor of Cairnbrook Lutheran 
Parish, Somerset County, Pa., was 
guest speaker at the 75th anniversary 
of the Grace Lutheran Church in 
Sunbury. He is a ministerial son of 
Grace congregation. 

'39 

Kathryn Meyer is now executive 
director of the Mansfield, Ohio YM- 
CA after similar service in High 
Point, N.C. Her father was the Rev. 
Roy J. Meyer '17 and her mother the 
former Anna Marie Crumrine ma'17. 

x'43 

Fire burned out the third floor of 
the Hotel Governor Snyder, 
Selinsgrove, and caused an estimated 
$125,000 damage on July 19. The 
owner is Robert R. McFaU. 

'45 

Harold R. Snyder has been named 
to an international position as director 
of development for Traveler's Aid In- 
ternational Social Service, which deals 
with problems of travelers who get in- 
to trouble, and with runaway children 
in America. The agency also works in 
cooperation with the Vietnam govern- 
ment in placing nearly a half-million 
babies fathered by American 
servicemen during the war. He will be 
responsible for the funding and public 
relations of the total program. His son 
is Jeff Snyder '11. 

'49 

Douglas E. Arthur was com- 
mencement speaker in June at his 
alma mater, Millersburg (Pa.) H.S. 

'53 

The Rev. Kenneth Hill has been 
reappointed to the Troxelville (Pa.) 
Methodist Church. He was formerly 
at the Methodist Church in Steelton. 




Knouse '31 and Snyder '45 



'58 

Dr. John H. Anthony has assumed 
his new duties as President of Los 
Angeles City College, which has 
22,000 students and a professional 
staff of 650. He was previously vice 
president of program at DuPage Col- 
lege in Illinois. He lives at 855 N. 
Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
90029. 

David A. Boltz, assistant professor 
of music and conductor of the Sus- 
quehanna University Orchestra, was 
orchestra conductor for the summer 
at the Northeast Music Camp, Ware, 
Mass. 

'59 

Mary Davis Heisey introduced her 
composition, "Repentance." during a 
concert at the Ross Street United 
Methodist Church, Lancaster, Pa. in 
June. 

'60 

John Yanuklis is now president of 
Gypsum Services Corp. He and his 
wife, the former Ann Hewes '61, and 
family live at 38531 Tyson Lane, Fre- 
mont, Calif. 94536. 

'63 

Shirley Foehl Chee is business 
manager and part owner of Clyde 
Casey Real Estate, Inc., Gretna, La. 
She has also been elected president of 
the West Jefferson Republican 
Women's Club and a member of the 
board of the Political Action Council 



28 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



of New Orleans. Winston Chee is 
assistant chief engineer of Taylor 
Diving & Salvage, Belle Chasse, La. 
They live at 728 Hickory St., Gretna, 
La. 70053. 

Robert J. Summer III has com- 
pleted the course work for his doc- 
torate at Indiana University and is 
working on his dissertation. He is 
director of choral activities at the 
University of South Florida, Tampa. 
New address: 7016D Santa Ana Dr., 
Tampa, Fla. 33617. 

James C. Black was appointed 
assistant vice president and cashier for 
the Tri-County National Bank in 
Middleburg, Pa. 

Neil R. Smith is the new principal 
of the Tyrone (Pa.) Area H.S. He 
was formerly in Morristown, N.J. as 
math instructor, computer center 
director, and vice principal. 

'64 

Dr. Alan Bachrach Jr. has begun a 
residency in ophthalmology and in- 
ternal medicine at Ohio State 
University, College of Veterinary 
Medicine. He was previously a staff 
member at Amgell Memorial 
Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Fred W. Jacobs has been appointed 
executive assistant to the chairman of 
the Pennsylvania Board of Probation 
and Parole in Harrisburg. Address: 
822 Meadow Lane, Camp Hill, Pa. 
17011. 



'66 

John J. Menapace has been pro- 
moted to business unit manager for 
Bell Telephone in Harrisburg. 

Douglas Kile has purchased a farm 
on Foster Valley Road, Owego, N.Y. 
13827 where he resides with his wife 
and two daughters. Doug is with IBM 
as a manager of management 
development and personnel research 
in Endicott 

Peter G. Fager has accepted a new 
position in the Forecasting Analysis 
Division of General Telephone and 
Electronics of Florida. He and his 
family reside at 6120 Quail Ridge Dr., 
Scott Lake Estates, Lakeland, Fla. 
33803. 

Lawrence E. Mundis, a regional 
representative for a financial services 
firm who also teaches Problems of 
Democracy at Tyrone (Pa.) Area 
H.S.. is the dedicatee of the 1973 
TAHS yearbook. 



'68 

Robert Hadfield and his guest Don 
Orso won the 54-hole Member-Guest 
Golf Tournament at the Richmond 
(Va.) Country Club in June. Their 
net score of 181 won by a single 
stroke. 

'69 

Daniel M. Corveleyn is now a 
public defender for Monroe Co. (Pa.) 
and is associated with the law firm of 
Mervine, Brown & Newman. His wife, 
the former Karen Kister '70, is with 
BASF Wyandotte Corp. in East 
Stroudsburg. Address is R.D. 2, Box 
19, Stroudsburg, Pa. 18360. 

'70 

Carol Crane was awarded a 
Fulbright Summer Scholarship to 
Germany this- summer. She attended 
the Goethe Institute for eight weeks 
and traveled the rest of the summer. 
She teaches German I & II at 
Holicong Jr. H.S. in Doylestown, Pa. 
Her mother is the former Marian 
Crompton '41. 

1/Lt. Gregg A. Hodgdon is now 
based in San Diego at the Marine 
Corps Recruiting Depot where he is a 
series commander for platoons of new 
recruits. Address: 4070 Huerfano 
Ave., #308, San Diego, Calif. 92117. 
His mother is the former Jean 
Rheinhart '38. 

C. Frederic Jellinghaus has been 
appointed assistant to the director of 
public relations for the 
Philadelphia/Delaware Valley public 



broadcasting station WHYY, Inc. 
Channel 12. Address: 122 Elmwood 
Ave., Narberth, Pa. 19072. 

Betty Swartz Gallup is teaching 8th 
grade English in the Haverford 
Township School District. Brian is 
with Fidelity National Bank of 
Philadelphia. They reside at 1295 
North Providence Rd., Apt. C-301, 
Media, Pa. 19063. 

'71 

Peggy Haas was named winner of 
the American Guild of Organists' 
Middle Atlantic Young Organists 
Competition and will be eligible to 
compete in national competition in 
Cleveland next June. In May she was 
one of four finalists in an in- 
ternational organ competition in Lon- 
don, Ontario. 

Jill Heffelfinger received the Junior 
High Student Council award as 
Teacher of the Year at Selinsgrove. 
She teaches 8th grade math. 

David A. Wick is now teaching 
earth science at Pottsgrove H.S., 
Pottstown, Pa. 

'72 

2/Lt. Frederick C. Hoffman has 
been awarded silver wings upon 
graduation from USAF navigator 
training at Mather AFB, Calif. He 
has been assigned to MacDill AFB, 
Fla., where he will fly with a unit of 
Tactical Air Command. 

Donald Baker is now attending the 
Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 
Philadelphia. 



LATEST SELECTIONS 

Selected to appear in the volume, Outstanding Young Women 
of America for 1973, are Frances Wirt Fisher '60, Gwynedd Valley, 
Pa., a chemical process design engineer with Sun Oil Co., and Mary- 
Margaret Overly Peraro '60, Lancaster, Pa., coordinator of the 
foreign languages department of Donegal H.S. 

In Outstanding Young Men of America for 1973: Dr. Donald 
M. Gray '60, Dallas, Tex., research biologist at the University of 
Texas; The Rev. Dr. John M. O'Maltey '60, Green River, Utah, 
pastor of the Green River Community Church; The Rev. Richard D. 
Reichard '60, Beltsville, Md., assistant pastor and superintendent of 
the National Lutheran Home for the Aged, Washington, D.C; Dr. 
Carlton B. Smith '60, Harrisonburg, Va., associate professor of his- 
tory, Madison College; Dr. Larry W. Updegrove '60. a dentist in 
York, Pa.; Dr. Donald A. Winey '60, Warminster, Pa., research 
chemist with the Rohm & Haas Co. 



FALL 1973 



29 




Sons and daughters of Susquehanna alumni who 
joined the Class of 1977 this fall include, front: 
Jeffrey L. Snyder (Harold R. Snyder '45), 
Harrisburg; Katherine McAllister (Elwood M. 
McAllister '49), Allentown, Pa.; Karen L. 
Oberheim (Leah Cryder Oberheim '47), Bellefonte, 
Pa.; Susan A. Unangst (Edward T. Unangst '53), 
South Williamsport, Pa.: Daniel E. Ditzler 
(Richard Ditzler x'38), Rosemont, Pa.; Luther E. 
Clapper (Edwin M. Clapper '34), Red Lion, Pa. 
Back: Philip R. Saler (Barbara Lease Saler '50), 



Campbell, N.Y.; F. Larry VanKirk (Theodore J. 
VanKirk x'42), Charlotte, N.C.; Dean Abbott 
(Xavier Abbott '35), Swoyerville, Pa.; Thomas D. 
Odell (Winifred Myers Odell x'49), Hughesville, 
Pa.; Steven A. Pur pur (Ralph E. Purpur '66), 
Darien, Conn.; Mark A . Buese (Fern Baumgardner 
Weaver '51), Windber, Pa.; David E. Orris (Ken E. 
Orris), Middleburg, Pa. Missing from the photo: 
Kathleen L. Chadwick (Henry G. Chadwick '50), 
Gwynedd Valley, Pa.: Stephen D. Rupe (Dean E. 
Rupe '53), Yeagerstown, Pa. 



Bruce E. Kennedy is now a student 
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in 
a joint program studying for a doctor 
of ministry degree at the seminary 
and a master's in public ad- 
ministration from the University of 
Pittsburgh. Address: Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, Box 223, 616 
North Highland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
15206. 

Edmund P. Kling III is an ac- 
counting analyst for the American 
Chain & Cable Co., York, Pa. 

Sharon Witteck is an elementary 
strings teacher for the Randolph 
Township School District, Dover, N.J. 

Ernest L. Tyler, formerly a 
teacher-coach in Gettysburg, Pa., is 
now on the faculty of Shikellamy 
H.S., Sunbury. His wife, the former 
Karen Shaffer, has joined the IBM 
department of Kellogg Co. in 
Williamsport. New address: 60 South 
Second St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 



Advanced degrees 



Megan Einzig Abbott '70: M.Ed, in 
history, Shippensburg State College. 
She is teaching 7th grade ancient 
history at Good Hope Intermediate 
School, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Rickey L. Bair '69: M.Div., Lu- 
theran Theological Seminary at Phila- 
delphia. He is a pastor at St. John's 
Lutheran Church, Summit, N.J., 
where the senior pastor is the Rev. 
Franklin D. Fry, a former member 
of the Susquehanna Board. 

Terry R. Bossert '68: J.D. cum 
laude, Dickinson School of Law. He 
is an assistant district attorney for the 
City of Philadelphia. 

Sally Curnow Boyd '68: M.Ed, in 
counselor education. Pennsylvania 
State University. Her husband is Ken- 
neth M. x'69. 



Nelda Shafer Davis '51: M.Ed, in 
counselor education, Pennsylvania 
State University. She is counselor at 
Park Forest Jr. H.S., State College, 
Pa. 

Donald R. Davis x'50: M.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University. He 
earned his B.A. at Lehigh University, 
B.D. and Th.M. degrees at Princeton 
Theological Seminary. Since 1969 he 
has been campus minister at Penn 
State. 

Peter G. Fager '66: master's in 
mathematics. Elmira College, 1972. 

Ronald J. Hill '68: D.M.D., 
Fairleigh Dickinson University School 
of Dentistry. He is working in a post 
graduate program in periodontics at 
Columbia Presbyterian Hospital with 
teaching and research responsibilities, 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



and practices in Fort Lee, N.J. 

Hans K. Klar '68: M.A., Rutgers 
University. He teaches German in 
Toms River, N.J. 

John Robert Koons '69: M.Div., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, 
Philadelphia. He is pastor of Holy 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Bethlehem, 
Pa. 

Craig L. Lawson '67: M.Div., New 
Brunswick Theological Seminary, 
1972. His third year was spent with 
L'Abri Fellowship in Switzerland. He 
is with the book division of Logos 
International, Plainfield, N.J. 

Douglas L. Lepley '69: M.A. in 
English. Bucknell University. He 
teaches English and journalism, ad- 
vises the yearbook and school 
newspaper, and coaches the girls' 
varsity and JV basketball teams at 
West Snyder H.S. Doug and his wife, 
the former Cynthia Ness '69, live in 
Beaver Springs, Pa. with their two 
daughters. 

Glenn E. Ludwig '69: M.Div., Lan- 
caster Theological Seminary. In 1972 
he won the prize for the best written 
sermon and placed second for the 
Spessard Prize in Christology. He 
served his internship at Salem 
Lutheran Church, Lititz, Pa. and dur- 
ing the summer assisted at his home 
church, St. Paul's, Lititz. Glenn and 
his wife, the former Beth Runk '69, 
and their two children are living in 
Washingtonville, Pa., where he is now 
pastor of the Washingtonville 
Lutheran Parish. For the past two 
years Beth taught English and Drama 
at Warwick H.S., Lititz. 

Brian McCartney '72: master's 
degree in education of the deaf and 
hearing impaired, Columbia Universi- 
ty. He is teaching at the Lexington 
School for the Deaf in New York Ci- 
ty and is continuing studies in the 
field of special education, preparing 
himself for the multiple-handicapped 
child. 

William R. Metz x'65: M.B.A. con- 
centrating in quantitative analysis. 
University of Cincinnati. He is with 
Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, as a 
senior systems analyst. 

Donald P. Orso '68: M.Ed, in 
counseling. University of Virginia. He 
is a counselor at Anne Arundel Com- 
munity College, Arnold. Md. 

The Rev. James T. Parks '64: 
S.T.M. He is pastor of the Abiding 
Peace Lutheran Church of Budd 
Lake, N.J. Jim and his wife, the 
former Dena Sebastian '66, are par- 



ents of a daughter, Jennifer Lynn. 

James Alden Rodgers '64: M.Ed, in 
English, Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Deborah Elizabeth Ritter '68: 
M.D., Medical College of 
Pennsylvania (formerly Woman's 
Medical College). She has begun a 
clinical graduate program at Thomas 
Jefferson University in Philadelphia. 

Richard F. Savior Jr. '69: M.D., 
Jefferson Medical College, Thomas 
Jefferson University. He has begun a 
four-year surgery residency at Lan- 
kenau Hospital, Philadelphia. He and 
his wife live at 933 Mill Grove Dr., 
Mill Grove Apt.. Audubon, Pa. 
19407. 

Richard L. Schuster '68: J.D., 
Dickinson School of Law, 1972. He 
is assistant district attorney of West 
Chester, Pa. 

W. Stevens Shipman Jr. '69: 
M.Div., Lutheran School of Theology 
at Chicago. He began duties July 1 at 
Light Street-Canby (Pa.) Lutheran 
Parish. Steve did clinical pastoral 
education work at the Presbyterian-St. 
Luke's Medical Center in Chicago 
and at the Nittany Valley-Sugar 
Valley Lutheran Area Ministry. 

Walter LeRoy Startzel Jr. '68: 
M.Div., Lutheran Theological 



Seminary at Gettysburg. He is pastor 
of Mt. Calvary and Mt. Zion 
Churches in Levansville and 
Bakersville, Pa., and served in- 
ternships at Episcopal Hospital, Texas 
Children's Hospital and Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Taneytown. Md. 

Julie B. Stauffer '69: M.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College and 
Hospital. She was awarded the Joseph 
A. Langbord Memorial Prize for 
outstanding qualities of 
humanitarianism in medicine, and 
received the Medical Assistance Pro- 
gram's Fellowship from the DeWitt- 
Wallace Foundation. She also was 
secretary of the Student Institute and 
took part in a free elective in East 
Africa (Susquehanna Alumnus, 
Spring 1973) and externships at Al- 
toona (Pa.) Hospital; Harrisburg 
Polyclinic and St. Luke's, Denver, 
Colo., where she is now interning. 

Bruce Borden Svare '71: M.A., 
Bucknell University. 

Ray Foster Tyler '51, '56: M.S. in 
business administration, Bucknell 
University. 

Nan Weller '68; M.Ed, in music 
education, Penn State University. She 
teaches music in Shamokin, Pa. and is 
choir director at the First Presby- 
terian Church. 



"J dO" 



OTTO-DELONGUE 
Leonie A. Delongue to Robert Carl 
Otto '73, May 9. 1970. Bob is a 
management trainee in the distribu- 
tion department of General Motors 
Truck & Coach Division, Pontiac, 
Mich. 3006 N. Wilson Ave., Royal 
Oak, Mich. 48067. 

HOLMES-SWARTZ 
Sally Ann Swartz '71 to Ronald 
James Holmes '73, July 24, 1971. 
Sally has taught elementary vocal 
music in Danville, Pa. and Ron is a 
senior technical assistant for Bell 
Laboratories, Allentown, while also 
doing graduate work at Lehigh 
University. Apt. 202, 624 Benner 
Rd.. Allentown, Pa. 18104. 
HENRY-GARVER 
Donna Lou Garver '67 to Ronald 
Mark Henry, October 14, 1972, Arl- 



ington Cemetery Chapel, Fort Myer, 
Va. Donna is a stewardess for Pan 
American World Airways, based in 
Washington, D.C. Capt. Henry is in 
the Adjutant General Corps of the 
U.S. Army, stationed at Fort Myer as 
personnel administration of- 
ficer. 7402 Englewood R d . , 
#201, Annandale, Va. 22003. 
BRINSER-STOCKER 
Judy Marie Stocker x'73 to Steven 
Lee Brinser '73, November 24, 1972, 
Immanuel United Church of Christ, 
Williamsport, Pa. Steve is the son of 
Foster M. and Jean Kinzer Brinser 
'45. Susquehanna's former Chaplain J. 
Stephen Bremer officiated. James A. 
'73 and Linda Walton Senger '73, 
Ronald J. Holmes '73 and J. Donald 
Steele Jr. '73 were in the wedding 
party. Judy completed her senior year 



FALL 1973 



31 



at S.U. and was graduated from 
Albright College with a B.A. in home 
economics. Steve is on the audit staff 
of Price Waterhouse & Co., 
Philadelphia. Apt. 5509 Gibbs 
Rd., Coachman East Apts., Lin- 
denwold, N.J. 08021. 

NOLL-NACE 

Deborah Irene Nace to Robert L. 
Noll '73, April 21, 1973, Richfield 
(Pa.) United Methodist Church. 
Richard Grubb '75 was an usher. Mrs. 
Noll, a music education graduate of 
Mansfield State College, is teaching in 
the Danville (Pa.) Jr. H.S. Bob served 
three years in the U.S. Navy and 
graduated from the Navy School of 
Music. He is with the Pennsylvania 
State Department of 

Highways. 645 North St., 
Northumberland, Pa. 17857. 

SCHENEFIELD-McCULLOUGH 

Susan L. McCullough to Jordan A. 
Schene field '73, April 21, 1973, Huff- 
man Methodist Church, Birmingham, 
Ala. Steven Brinser '73 was an usher. 
The bride is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. Jordy is automo- 
tive area manager for Zayre, Inc., 
Green Springs Highway, Birmingham. 
739-L Barcelona Court, Birmingham, 
Ala. 35209. 

SCHUMAN-MILLER 

Pamela G. Miller '72 to Chester D. 
Schuman '72, May 12, 1973, First 
United Methodist Church, 
Greensburg, Pa. Lauren Tweed '72, 
Greg Reppa '71, Chris Rogers Kindon 
'72 and Linda Luttgens '72 were at- 
tendants. Pamela is working toward 
her master's degree in special educa- 
tion and Chester toward his master's 
in guidance and counseling, both at 
Memphis State University in Ten- 
nessee. 

GURRERJ-WARRENDER 

Joyce Anne Warrender '73 to 
William Frank Gurreri, May 13, 
1973. 1850 Powder Mill Rd., 

York, Pa. 17402. 

PHILIPS-SCHIRM 

Mary Jane Schirm '73 to Robert 
George Philips '73, May 29, 1973. 
Mary Jane is an auditor for H.E.W. 
Audit Agency, Philadelphia, Coach- 
men East Apt. 2509, Gibbsboro Rd., 
Lindenwold, N.J. 08021. 

ADSIT-WELCH 

Linda A. Welch x'72 to Jon T. 
Adsit. 11619 Charter Oak Court, 
Apt. 302, Reston, Va. 22090. 
TUOMISTO-MOORE 

Gale I. Moore '73 to Roy Stewart 
Tuomisto '73. Roy is assistant pro- 



duction supervisor for Hanover 
Brands. 304 Baltimore St., 
Hanover, Pa. 17331. 

BROPHY-HERROLD 

Linda Christine Herrold '73 to 
Charles Albert Brophy '70, June 2, 
1973, Paradise United Methodist 
Church, Port Trevorton, Pa. Louise 
Brophy '72, Donald Green '70, and 
William Cooke '70 were in the wed- 
ding party. Bruce Morrison '73 was 
organist. Linda is with the Selinsgrove 
State School and Hospital. Charles is 
taking a year's leave of absence from 
his studies at the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Get- 
tysburg. R.D. 1, Port Trevorton, 
Pa. 17864. 

HOLLINGSHEAD-LANCIONE 

Elizabeth Anne Hollingshead '73 
to Emilio Anthony Lancione '73, June 
2, 1973, First United Methodist 
Church, Millville, N.J. John Pivarnik 
'73 was organist and Linda Walton 
Senger '73, soloist. The wedding party 
included Jane Bogenrief '74, Ellen 
Hindman '73, James Senger '73 and 
Earl Paine '73. Elizabeth is a service 
representative with Liberty Mutual 
Insurance Co. Mel is a technical 
representative with Burroughs 
Corp. 219 North 40th St., Apt. 
204, Harrisburg, Pa. 17111. 
DAGLE-YOUNG 

Rebecca Ann Young '73 to David 
Day Dagle III '73, June 9, 1973, East 
Chapel of Sharon Lutheran Church, 
Selinsgrove. Margaret Muir '73 and 
Andrew Weitzenkorn '73 were at- 
tendants. Rebecca is with the Snyder 
County Trust Company and Dave is 
with PP&L. Salem, R.D. 1, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

BATESON-LUCAS 

Anne Louise Lucas '73 to Steven 
Raymond Bateson '73, June 16, 1973, 
St. Andrew's Lutheran Church, Mun- 
cy, Pa. Carol Naplacic '75, William 
Sanders '73 and T. Dean Bowen '75 
attended. Anne is studying for the 
M.S. in occupational therapy at the 
Medical College of Virginia/Virginia 
Commonwealth University. Steve is a 
staff accountant for Ernst & Ernst in 
Richmond. 8318 Forest Park Ct., 
Richmond, Va. 23229. 

BECHTEL-SMITH 

Carole Janet Smith '72 to Richard 
Allen Bechtel '72, June 16, 1973, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church, Lititz Pa. 
Music was provided by the organist 
and soloist, Donna Ake Burkholder 
'67. Barbara Lane '73 and William 
Bechtel '71 were attendants. Carole is 



a teacher in the Manheim School 
District and Rick is a second-year 
graduate student at the Philadelphia 
School of Optometry. 1322 Oak 
Lane Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19126. 
CORYELL-HANCOCK 

Susan Hancock '72 to David Allen 
Coryell '73, June 16, 1973, at the 
bride's home, Franklin, Mass. Louise 
Hower (Costello) '72, Barbara Lynch 
x'72 and Keith Costello '73 were in 
the wedding party. David is a 
graduate student and assistant at 
Mansfield State College. Maines- 
burg, Pa. 16932. 

HILL-MORRIS 

Mrs. Susan Colestock Morris to 
Wayne David Hill '70, June 16, 1973, 
St. James Lutheran Church, Get- 
tysburg, Pa. Clark Benson x'69 served 
as best man. The bride, graduate of 
Gettysburg College, taught kin- 
dergarten in Baltimore. Wayne is a 
member of the Army Reserves and a 
partner in the Gettysburg Con- 
struction Co. 203 Hill's Drive, 
Gettysburg, Pa. 17325. 

MAYER-HAMLEN 

Mary Elizabeth Hamlen '73 to 
Frederick C. Mayer Jr. '71, June 16, 
1973, Old Greenwich Presbyterian 
Church, Phillipsburg, N.J. 
Participants in the wedding were Nan- 
cy Finan '73, Carol Bringman '73, 
Marlyn Rath '73, David Rosborough 
'71, Domenico Seddio '71, George 
Shapcott '71 and Michael Carlini '74. 
Rick is a systems engineer at Air Pro- 
ducts Chemicals, Inc. and is com- 
pleting courses for the master's degree 
at Lehigh University. 1117 South 
Jefferson St., Apt. 9, Allentown, Pa. 
18103. 

REINHART-HINE 

Helen Young Hine to William 
Charles Reinhart '64, June 23, 1973, 
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 
Bridgeton, N.J. Theron Royer '65 was 
best man. Mrs. Reinhart was 
graduated from Oldfields School, 
Glencoe, Md. and Stratford College, 
Danville, Va. Bill received the 
master's degree from Glassboro State 
College and is a teacher at Pennsville 
(N.J.) H.S. Reeves House, 
Greenwich, N.J. 08323. 

WRISLEY-HAVENS 

Nan Carta Havens '73 to Lt. Dale 
E. Wrisley, June 23, 1973. 2727 
El Parque, Apt. A, Rancho Cor- 
dova, Calif. 95670. 

HAGGARTY-HARTMAN 

Cozette Sue Hartman '71 to Joseph 
John Haggerty, June 30, 1973, St. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



1973, 
Penn 



Pius X Roman Catholic Church, 
Selinsgrove. Cozette, also a graduate 
of the Katherine Gibbs School, was 
employed by Philip Apter & Son Inc., 
Maplewood, N.J. Mr. Haggerty, 
graduate of Springfield College, is a 
biology teacher at Agawam (Mass.) 
H.S. Colonial Estate Apts., Apt. 
803, Springfield, Mass. 01109. 
GEORGE-BELLETTI 

June Marie Belletti '73 to Chris 
Allen George '73, June 30, 
Church of St. Justin Martyr, 
Valley, Pa. Pamela Carolan '73, John 
Foltz '74, Fred Hooper '73 and 
Timothy Gotwald '72 took part in the 
wedding while Leander Claflin HI 
x'73 was organist and a brass en- 
semble included Susan Lang '74, Earl 
Paine '73, Dale Orris '75, Donald 
Littlejohn II '75, John White '76 and 
Nevin Garrett '74. June is a manage- 
ment development trainee with State 
Farm Insurance and Chris is a con- 
tractor with Overbrook Tile Co., 
Philadelphia. 361 Hilltop Dr., Apt. 
102, King of Prussia, Pa. 19406. 
WILCOX-LEWIS 

Patricia Lee Lewis to John Weeks 
Wilcox x'66, June 30, 1973, Chapel of 
Zion Lutheran Church, Sunbury. John 
is with the First National 
Bank. 608 Reagan St., Sunbury, 
Pa. 17801. 

RUHL-MERCINCAVAGE 

Georgeann Marie Mercincavage '73 
to John William Ruhl '71, July 14, 
1973, St. Casimir's Church, Pittston, 
Pa. John is the son of William R. '49 
and Bessie Bathgate Ruhl '48. Gail 
Holmes '73 and Heister Linn '69 were 
attendants. Georgeann is an auditor 
with the international public ac- 
counting firm of Coopers & Lybrand, 
Philadelphia office. John is a third- 
year dental student at Temple 
University School 
tistry. Apt. 3A 
Gardens, Manheim St., 
Pa. 19144. 

BRABAND-HETRICK 

Barbara M. Hetrick '72 to Timothy 
Eugene Braband '73, July 14, 1973, 
First Baptist Church, Lewisburg, Pa. 
Grover Foehlinger Jr. '73 played the 
organ and Donna Somerfield '74 the 
violin. John Pivarnik '73, Gregory 
Dye '73 and James Bates '74 were 
ushers. Barbara was director of music 
at the Prince of Peace Lutheran 
Church, Baltimore, Md., last year. 
Tim is director of music for the 
Atonement Lutheran Church, 
Wyomissing, Pa. 316-2 Beverly 



FALL 1973 



of Den- 
Wissahickon 
Philadelphia, 



Ct., Spring Side Manor Apts., Shill- 
ington, Pa. 19607. 

EICKHOFF-SHAY 

Pamela Jeanne Shay '73 to Karl 
William Eickhoff '73, July 21, 1973, 
United Methodist Church, Branch- 
ville, N.J. Karl is grocery manager 
with Shop 'N Bag Super-markets, 
Willingboro, N.J. Phoenix Apts. 
Q-6, Edgewater Park, Beverly, N.J. 
08010. 

ZUPKO-BROWN 

Kathleen Brown '73 to Michael 
Zupko Jr., July 21, 1973. 2201 
Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103. 
BENZENBERG-CAMP 

Mary W. Camp to Craig Benzen- 
berg x'71, August 4, 1973. The 
bride was graduated from Denison 
University with a B.A. in education. 
Craig received the B.S. in industrial 
design and is a graphic designer with 
the North Electric Co. at the Paul H. 
Henson Research Center, Columbus, 
Ohio. He is the son of Mrs. Larry 
Varble and the late Dr. Henry C. 
Benzenberg, who served as physician 
for S.U. football teams and many 
students in the late '50s. 526 
Northridge Rd., Circleville, Ohio 
43113. 

HUDSON-SHERWOOD 

Pamela Ann Sherwood x'73 to 
James J. Hudson, August 11, 1973, 
Oradell, N.J. 789 Woodland Ave., 
Oradell, N.J. 07649. 

COSTELLO-HOWER 

Louise Anne Hower '72 to Keith 
Joseph Costello '73, August 1, 1973, 
St. Matthew Lutheran Church, Lan- 
caster, Pa. Wendy Mohr Lewis '72, 
Susan Hancock Coryell '72, David 
Coryell '73 and John Basti '73 were 
in the wedding party. Louise is a 
caseworker for Lebanon County 
(Pa.) Workshop, Inc. Keith is with 
Chocolate World, H e r s h e y , 
Pa. 401 E. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 
17078. 

HAFER-SHAFER 

Rose Marie Shafer to Richard 
Wynn Hafer '65, August 18, 1973, St. 
Mark's Lutheran Church, 
Williamsport, Pa. Mrs. Hafer, a 
graduate of Bloomsburg State Col- 
lege, is an elementary teacher at the 
Joseph C. Ashkar School, 
Hughesville. Richard is a mathematics 
teacher at Hughesville H.S. 423 
E. Water St., Hughesville, Pa. 17737. 
HOFFMAN-MAGILL 

Joan Catherine Magill '73 to Steven 
Murray Hoffman '73, September 29, 
1973. Joan is secretary at Aetna Life 



Insurance Co., Harrisburg. Steve is a 
graduate student at the Pennsylvania 
State University Capitol Campus and 
an accountant for Peat, Marwick, 
Mitchell & Co., Harrisburg. 5026 
Trent Rd., Apt. C, Harrisburg, Pa. 
17109. 



Born Crusaders 



To Donald P. '68 and Mary Ann 
Carpenter Orso '68, their first child, 
a daughter, Sandra Elizabeth, May 3, 
1972. Apt. 203, 7853 Americana 
Cir., Glen Burnie, Md. 21061. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William R. 
Brower x'68, their second daughter, 
Stacey Lynne, October 26, 1972. Bill 
is cost accounting supervisor for C-E 
Minerals, King of Prussia, Pa., and is 
planning graduate study. 117 First 
Ave., Broomall, Pa. 19008. 

To I^ee M. and Barbara Letcher 
Yancey '70, a daughter, Tristen Seeler, 
November 12, 1972. Father is S.E. 
Area Manufacturing manager for 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1973-74 

Winter Sports Schedules 

VARSITY BASKETBALL 



Dl 


Wagner 


H 


D5 


Juniata 


A 


D8 


Messiah 


A 


D12 


Albright 


H 


D15 


Wilkes 


H 


D19 


Scranton 


A 


D28-29 


Davis & Elkins 






Tournament 


W.Va. 


J4-5 


Washington & Lee 






Tournament 


Va. 


J9 


Albright 


A 


J12 


Lycoming 


A 


J15 


York 


A 


J19 


Lycoming 


H 


J21 


Philadelphia Textile 


H 


J23 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


J26 


Grove City 


A 


J31 


Upsala 


A 


F2 


Elizabethtown 


H 


F4 


Juniata 


H 


F6 


Wilkes 


H 


F9 


Delaware Valley 


A 


F13 


Lock Haven State 


H 


F16 


Westminster 
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


H 


J18 


Lebanon Valley 


A 


J24 


Albright 


H 


J29 


Shippensburg State 


A 


Fl 


Bloomsburg State 


A 


F4 


Wilkes 


A 


F12 


Dickinson 


H 


F14 


Bucknell 


H 



iX< 



Boise Cascade's Composite Can 
Division. 221 Royal Oak Circle, 
Longwood, Fla. 32750. 

To Joseph S. '69 and Glennette 
Peterson Papovich '69, a son, Casey 
John, December 14, 1972. Joe was 
released from the Air Force in 
September and is doing graduate work 
in international relations at Catholic 
University. 7362 Forest Rd., Lan- 
dover, Md. 20785. 

To Dr. William L. '67 and Lois 
Swartz Yingling '66. their first child, a 
son, Mark Trout, December 22, 1972. 
Bill is in his final year of family prac- 
tice residency at Memorial Hospital, 
Johnstown. 226 Luzerne St., 
Johnstown, Pa. 15905. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Seifert 
'67, their third child and second 
daughter, Deborah Anne, January 5, 
1973. Gary is a special agent for the 
FBI and last spring was transferred to 
Philadelphia. 835 Upton Way, 
Somerdale, N.J. 08083. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald I. Foye 
'62, a son, Bryan I., February 28, 
1973. Ron is on the faculty at Line 
Mountain H.S., Dalmatia, Pa. and 



* 





WRESTLING 




D4 


Scranton 


A 


Dll 


Juniata 


A 


D14 


Bucknell 


A 


J9 


Albright 


H 


J16 


King's 


H 


J19 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


J23 


Muhlenberg 


A 


F2 


Delaware Valley 


H 


F6 


Eliza bethtown 


H 


F9 


York 


A 


F16 


Gettysburg 


A 


F22-23 


MAC Delaware 


Valley 





JV BASKETBALL 




Dl 


Wagner 


H 


D5 


Juniata 


A 


D8 


Messiah 


A 


D12 


Albright 


H 


D15 


Wilkes 


H 


D19 


Scranton 


A 


J9 


Albright 


A 


J12 


Lycoming 


A 


J15 


York 


A 


J19 


Lycoming 


H 


J21 


Philadelphia Textile 


H 


J23 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


F2 


Elizabethtown 


H 


F4 


Juniata 


H 


F6 


Wilkes 


H 


F13 


Lock Haven State 


H 


F16 


Westminster 


H 



also coaches girls' basketball. 206 
S. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Edgar R. and Cheryl Spalding 
Wright '66, a daughter, Ginger Lu- 
anne. April 13, 1973. Cheryl is teach- 
ing mathematics in Elmira, N.Y.. 
R.D 2, Millerton. Pa. 16936. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Zerbe 
'72, their first child, a daughter, Carly 
Jean, May 5, 1973. Chuck is a store 
manager for Giant Foods. 6620 
Huntingdon St., Apt. 6, Harrisburg, 
Pa. 17111. 

To William R. x'65 and Ann Fer- 
rence Metz '63, their second daughter, 
Lisa Elaine, May 9, 1973. 7055 
Manderlay Dr., Florence, Ky. 41042. 

To David and Victoria Fay 
Heberlig '69, their second child, a 
daughter, Julie Lynn, May 17, 
1973. 421 South 22nd St., 
Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Carl 
'70, their second child, a daughter, 
Andrea Michelle, May 22, 1973. Mike 
teaches music in the Steelton- 
Highspire Schools. 2154 Third 
Ave., Steelton, Pa. 17113. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Ullman, 
their first child, a daughter, Catherine 
Jane, May 26, 1973. Dr. Ullman is 
assistant professor of mathematical 
sciences at S.U. 404 West Pine St.. 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Richard E. '66 and Margaret 
Lynn Oelkers Talbot '66, their first 
child, a daughter, Susan Lynn, May 
28, 1973. Lynn retired from her 
teaching position but is continuing to 
give private piano lessons. Dick is 
business manager for the Stroudsburg 
School District. 101 High Ter- 
race, R.D. 3, Stroudsburg, Pa. 18360. 

To Gregory T. '72 and Linda 
Kymer Jeffrey x'73, their first child, a 
daughter, Jennifer Lea, June 1, 1973. 
Greg is a factory representative for 
Domore Office Furniture covering 
the territory of Philadelphia, South 
Jersey and Delaware. 19 Andover 
Rd., Glenmoore, Pa. 19343. 

To Capt. Thomas E. x'66 and Emi- 
ly Lees Peachey '70, their first child, 
a son, Michael Thomas, June 12. 
1973. M.O.Q. R.R. 42, Camp Le- 
jeune, N.C. 28542. 

To Richard E. x'68 and Ellen 
Rogers Mearns '68, their first child, a 
son. Richard Ernest Jr. Grandparents 
are Edward S. '42 and Blanche 
Forney Rogers '42. 421 Woodland 
Ave., Morrisville, Pa. 19067. 

To Christifer F. and Patricia 
Sanderson Portner '68, their second 



child, a son, Christifer Jr.. July 1973. 
Mr. Portner is an architect with 
Direction Associates, Fort 
Washington. Pa. 306 Stout Rd., 
Ambler, Pa. 19002. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Willard J. Bow en 
'69, their second child, a daughter, 
Kristin Elizabeth, July 11, 1973. Bill 
is associated with the Percy Miller 
Agency. Selinsgrove, and Luck In- 
surance Agency, Middleburg. 330 
North High St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Spotts 
'68, their first child, a son, Richard 
Christopher, August 11, 1973. Rick is 
controller of On Line Service Corp., 
Philadelphia, specializing in on-line 
and off-line data processing services 
for member savings and loan associa- 
tions in a five-state region. 110 
Keeley Ave., New Britain, Pa. 18901. 



deaths 



Leone Havice Wallace '08, Tavares, 
Fla., August 2, 1971. She earned a 
Ph.B. degree from Bucknell Universi- 
ty, was a licensed mechanotherapist, 
and was a bookkeeper in Cleveland 
prior to retirement in 1961. 

Paul Wilbur Kniseley x'43, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., early 1973. He was 
the son of the Rev. John B. '13 and 
the late Mary Gray bill Kniseley '13, 
and brother of the Rev. Dr. Karl E. 
Kniseley '38. 

Frank A. Finnegan '26, April 1973, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. He held an M.A. 
from Columbia University and was 
supervising principal of Hanover 
Township Schools. After retirement 
he became director of student 
teaching at King's College, where he 
died in his classroom. 

Mary Gearhart Brobst '28, Sun- 
bury, Pa., April 30. 1973. A graduate 
of Irving Female College, she earned 
an M.A. in German and education at 
Susquehanna and taught in the Sun- 
bury schools, 1914-1953. 

David Samuel Fulcomer '32, 
Milford, N.J., May 14, 1973. He 
received an M.A. from New York 
University and taught mathematics in 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey until 
retirement in 1971. He was a veteran 
of World War II. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Houtz '08 and Beam '22 



William J. Weliky Esq. '31, New- 
ark, N.J., May 30, 1973. He earned 
his law degree from the Mercer- 
Beasley School of Law, now part of 
Rutgers University, and was a prac- 
ticing attorney for 34 years. He serv- 
ed in the Navy in World War II. 

The Rev. Charles E. Held '22, 
Chagrin Falls, Ohio, June 5, 1973. He 
received the B.D. from Western 
Theological Seminary and served 
pastorates in Ohio and Pennsylvania. 
After 17 years at Mt. Joy Lutheran 
Church, Gettysburg, Pa. he retired in 
1963 and then lived with his daughter, 
Roberta Held Harmon x'37 in 
Chagrin Falls. 

Emily Winston Lybarger '28, Mif- 
flinburg, Pa., June 27, 1973. A special 
education teacher in Mifflinburg 
schools and the Laurelton State 
School and Hospital, she also was a 
leader in activities of the Evangelical 
Community Hospital, Mifflinburg 
Public Library, First Presbyterian 
Church, and other organizations. A 
surviving sister is Dr. Mildred E. 
Winston '21. 

Mary K. Suffel '33, Media, Pa. July 
10, 1973. She earned the M.S.W. from 
the University of Pittsburgh and held 
social work positions in various parts 
of Pennsylvania, most recently as a 
caseworker in Delaware County. 

Justina Viehdorfer Dagle x'21, 
Selinsgrove, Pa., July 13, 1973. She 
was the widow of the Rev. David Day 
Dagle '22, Sem'25, who established 
the Lutheran Mission Station at 
Sanoyea, Liberia, West Africa, and 
succumbed to black water fever in 
1933. A daughter is Genevieve Dagle 
Krouse, receptionist and switchboard 
operator at Susquehanna, and a 
grandson is David D. Dagle HI '73. 



FALL 1973 



Merle A. Beam '22, Windber, Pa., 
July 18, 1973. Originally a journalist 
and after retirement a public relations 
practitioner, he was with the Windber 
public schools for 37 years — 18 as 
high school principal. During sum- 
mers, he owned and operated Beam's 
Attractions and for 10 years was 
president of the American Carnival 
Association. He also held high offices 
in Rotary International, Windber 
Public Library, Sons of the American 
Revolution, and other groups. He was 
a member of First Lutheran Church. 
An active S.U. booster and fund 
raiser, he was on the Alumni Associa- 
tion Executive Council, president of 
the Johnstown District Alumni Club 
and of Phi Mu Delta's alumni 
organization, and sent many students 
to Susquehanna. He was given the 
Alumni Award medal for Service in 
1968. Among his survivors are 
daughter Betty '51, wife of Donald F, 
Wohlsen '50, their daughter Kathryn 
'74; and brother George E. Beam '29. 
Funeral services were conducted by 
the Rev. David L. DeLong '64. 

Dr. George A. Fisher hc'22, Vero 
Beach, Fla., July 24, 1973. A well- 
known food technologist serving the 
industry for 57 years, he pioneered in 
food preparation and preservation, 
particularly for baby and armed 
forces products. He held Sus- 
quehanna's doctor of science degree. 
A brother is Luther A. Fisher '22. 

Dr. John Jacob Houtz '08, 
Selinsgrove, Pa., July 28, 1973. He 
was professor emeritus of chemistry 
at Susquehanna after having taught at 
his alma mater from 1927 until retire- 
ment in 1964. Recipient of an M.S. in 
chemical engineering from Louisiana 
State University and later an 
honorary Sc.D. from Carthage Col- 
lege, he operated a sugar factory in 
Cuba, 1913-1920. He then taught in 
the Sunbury schools before suc- 
ceeding his father, the late Dr. 
Thomas C. Houtz '86 as head of Sus- 
quehanna's Science Department. 
While an undergraduate, John cap- 
tained the 1907 football team as a 
130-lb. quarterback, also played 
basketball and sang in the Glee Club. 
He became a widely-respected teacher 
and surveyor, an active sportsman, 
Boy Scout committeeman, and 
organizer of the Selinsgrove Com- 
munity Center. His widow is the 
former Arline Fisher Bedeaux '37 and 
a stepdaughter is Claudette Bedeaux 
Jobson x'59. 



Wanted! 

people 
who can: 




If you can spend some time, 
even a few hours, with someone 
who needs a hand, not a handout, 
call your local Voluntary Action 
Center. Or write to "Volunteer," 
Washington, D.C. 20013 

We need you. 



<3> 



The National Center for 
Voluntary Action. 

H advertising contributed (or the public good 



THE SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1973-74 


C. Thomas Aikens, ii 


W. Donald Fisher 


Robert U. Redpath jr. 


State College, Pa. 


Selinsgrove, Pa. 


New York City 


John B. Apple 


Dr. Walter B. Freed 


Edward S. Rogers jr. 


Sunbury, Pa. 


Rochester, N.Y. 


Yardley, Pa. 


Douglas E. Arthur 


Dr. A. Roger Gobbel 


Dr. Henry W. Rozenberg, emeritus 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Gettysburg, Pa. 


Jersey Shore, Pa. 


Dr. Roger M. Blough, esq., 


Robert C. Goetze 


William R. Ruhl 


Vice Chairman 


Baltimore, Md. 


Lewisburg, Pa. 


New York City 


Dr. John C. Horn, Chairman 


Jack P. Shipe 


Dr. F. William Brandt 


Alexandria, Pa. 


Herndon, Pa. 


Altoona, Pa. 

William R. Burchfield 
Montgomery, Pa. 


Orlando W. Houts 
State College, Pa. 

Lawrence M. Isaacs 


Dr. Erle I. Shobert ii, 
Vice Chairman 
St. Marys, Pa. 


Dr. Leonard F. Bush 
Danville, Pa. 


Fox Point, Wis. 
Henry J. Keil 


Carl H. Simon 
Sun City, Ariz. 


Dr. Alvin W. Carpenter, esq., 
Secretary 
Sunbury, Pa. 

Preston B. Davis, esq. 
Milton, Pa. 

Samuel H. Evert 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 


Leonia, N.J. 

Dr. Richard C. Klick 
York, Pa. 

The Rev. Paul B. Lucas 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

Dr. Richard B. Martin, emeritus 
Brevard, N.C. 


Preston H. Smith 
Williamsport, Pa. 

W. Alfred Streamer, emeritus 
State College, Pa. 

Norman E. Walz, Treasurer 
Sunbury, Pa. 


William O. Faylor sr. 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 


Dr. Howard J. McCarney 
Harrisburg, Pa. 


Alan R. Warehime 
Hanover, Pa. 


Frank K. Fetterolf 


Mrs. Kimball D. Miller 


Dr. Gustave W. Weber 


Johnstown. Pa. 


Williamsport, Pa. 


Selinsgrove, Pa. 


The Rev. David N. Finney jr. 


Charles A. Nicely, emeritus 


Robert F. Weis 


Johnstown, Pa. 


Watsontown, Pa. 


Sunbury, Pa. 


Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher 


Joseph L. Ray 


Ralph Witmer 


York, Pa. 


Sunbury, Pa. 


Selinsgrove, Pa. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




7 8 6 S 6 <* 1 

MI^c m j ant SCHN 
50 SUSQUEHANNA A^ 
SELINSGRO V" p A 






173 70 



POSTMASTER: Please notify if undeliverable. En- 
tered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 Post 
Office as Second Class matter. 






nus 



WINTER 1974 



WZ> 







THE STORY OF NASEEM 




Naseem Momin 77 is a bright-eyed pre-medical student 
from Elizabethville, Pa. She talks easily and animatedly 
about her experiences of the past year and a half . . . 

Naseem's family is Asian and lived in Uganda in East 
Africa when in the summer of 1972 General Idi Amin, the 
Ugandan Chief of State, ordered that all non-citizen Asians 
must leave the country in three months. There were some 
80.000 such persons at the time; only a thousand or two 
were permitted to stay and are presumably still there. Of 
those expelled, nearly all have now taken up permanent 
residences in a score of countries under a mammoth United 
Nations resettlement program. 

While many of them were British citizens and were 
settled in Commonwealth countries, others were of un- 
determined nationality and were received in Western Europe, 
Japan, and the United States. Numerous social service 
agencies were involved, including Tressler-Lutheran Service 
Associates, with which Susquehanna cooperates in several 
volunteer projects. Tressler assisted in finding places for 
nearly a third of the first group of 1000 — among them, 
Naseem's father and mother — who came to this country 
in November of 1972. 

A month earlier. Nassem and her older sister Zarina. 
a chemistry teacher, had been sent to England to stay with 



friends until suitable arrangements could be made to reunite 
the family. Nurmohamed Momin. their father, was a high 
school mathematics teacher back home. He had held a 
British passport until Uganda became independent in 1962 
and he accepted citizenship in the new country. But he was 
the only member of the family in that favored status and. 
if they were to continue life together, he had to leave too. 
He is now a chemist for TRW Inc. Naseem came to 
America last February and her sister followed in April. 
Zarina is doing substitute teaching in Harrisburg. 

In Uganda, Naseem almost finished her "A-level" ex- 
aminations, which she describes as about one year ahead 
of U.S. high school graduation. At Susquehanna, she earned 
a 3.0 grade point average (taking calculus, chemistry, and 
Colonial American history) in the fall term. She's well 
aware of the competition for entrance into medical school 
here, and determined to justify the special scholarship she 
holds from the University — which is one of two for students 
from Uganda, with the other held by Nazmuddin Jiwani 
'77, a young man now living in Akron, Pa. 

Susquehanna Alumnus extends a warm welcome to 
these new Americans and wishes them successful academic 
careers as well as happy and rewarding lives. — editor 




On our cover: Dean Wilhelm Reuning 
discusses the scheduling of courses with 
freshman coed Naseem Momin, one of 
two displaced students from Uganda who 
have resettled in central Pennsylvania and 
entered Susquehanna last September. 
For more about Naseem and her family, 
read the opposite page. 

Inside, too, our readers should find 
some items of more than usual interest 
to help while away this raw and gasless 
winter — especially the article on the arts, 
page 4, and the Report from the Class 
of 1973, page 13. Do enjoy this issue, 
and a Happy 1974 to all Susquehanna 
alumni, their families and their friends! 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 43 



WINTER 1974 



No. 2 



CONTENTS 



The Story of Naseem 



The Arts and the Liberal Arts 



Tailgating at Homecoming "73 



Report from the Class of 1973 



INSIDE FRONT COVER 

4 

. . . . 10 
13 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writer 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



The Local Scene 17 

by George Tamke 

Susquehannans On Parade 18 

"I Do" 22 

Spring Sports Schedules 23 

Born Crusaders . . .24 

Deaths 25 



Harry W. Butts '48, president; George H. Bantley 
'41, William C. Davenport '53, vice presidents; 
Dorothy Turner '36, secretary; Chester G. Rowe 
'52, treasurer; Douglas E. Arthur '49, Henry J. 
Keil '39, Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, representa- 
tives on the University Board of Directors; Simon 
B. Rhoads '30, touis F. Santangelo '50, repre- 
sentatives on the University Athletic Committee. 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 
1974: Gerald C Herbster '58, Janis Adams John 
'59, Kenneth R. Kinney '40, Frank A. Procopio 
'61, Donald F. Wohlsen '50. Term expiring 1975; 
Xavier Abbott '35, Jane Southwick Mathias '49, 
Peter M. Nunn '57, Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68, 
John P. Yanuklis '60. Term expiring 1976: Samuel 
D. Clapper '68, Signe S. Gates '71, James 
Gormley '55, Lester C. Heilman '52, Franklin G. 
Smith '55. 



Alumni Association Standing Committees 

SU Sports 

by Ron Berkheimer 



Crusader Scoreboard 



. 27 
. 28 



30 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Pub- 
lished four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



WINTER 1974 



For both students 
and community. . . 

THE ARTS AND 

THE 
LIBERAL ARTS 



Most people who have attended a college like Susque- 
hanna would agree that, to be really complete, a liberal 
arts education does not consist merely of requirements 
listed in the college catalog. Indeed, the "liberal arts" 
idea implies a lot of other things and experiences, too, 
including extra-classroom activities and some exposure 
to serious music, theatre, dance, and other areas of the 
performing and visual arts. Not many would accept 
the conclusion of Hermann Goering, who is supposed 
to have said, "Every time I hear someone talk of cul- 
ture, I reach for my revolver." 

Particularly in the last decade or so, many colleges 
have expressed their belief in the importance of cul- 
tural activities by developing or expanding their per- 
forming arts programs and constructing new theatres 
or complexes for the fine arts. Susquehanna University's 
Artist Series has kept pace with ths movement by more 
than doubling its attendance during the past three years 



alone, primarily through the booking of such fine events 
as the Pennsylvania Ballet, the Beaux Arts Trio of New 
York, actor Vincent Price, the Goldovsky Opera Com- 
pany, and folksinger Pete Seeger. 

Visiting artists and lecturers have, of course, ap- 
peared at Susquehanna for many years — not only under 
Artist Series auspices, but also with the sponsorship of 
academic departments, student organizations, and other 
groups. But recent successes in presenting more variety 
and thus attracting larger audiences would certainly not 
have been possible without the completion in 1966 of 
Susquehanna's magnificent Chapel Auditorum. 

While music courses were first offered on campus 
in 1882 and recitals and concerts v/ere part of the col- 
lege scene before the turn of the century, the establish- 
ment of a separate department — the Conservatory of 
Music — in 1900 gave impetus to the desire to import 
culture from outside the college community. The prac- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Royal Winnipeg Ballet principal dancers Ana Maria de Gorriz and Salvatore 
Aiello in a scene from the highly-acclaimed "The Ecstasy of Rita Joe." 



tice of inviting artists to campus is generally credited 
to E. Edwin Sheldon, who came to Susquehanna in 
1901, organized the Susquehanna Musical Union, and 
arranged extensive tours for the Glee Club. According 
to The Story of Susquehanna University, "music experi- 
enced a Renaissance when E. Edwin Sheldon was ap- 
pointed Director of the Conservatory." 

Assistant librarian and archivist M. Jane Schnure 
'47 has compiled a comprehensive list which indicates 
that a program of visiting artists was begun in the 
1903-04 academic year with recitals by Pauline Wolt- 
mann, contralto; Corrinne Wiest-Anthony. soprano; 
and Georges Dundas, tenor. An average of five or six 
such programs were sponsored each year for the next 
two decades. Most were recitals by individual perform- 
ers, interspersed with an occasional lecturer or small 
chamber music group, and the programs were usually 
held in a large room on the main floor of Gustavus 



Adolphus Hall (destroyed by fire in 1964) since there 
was no larger public room available. At some time 
during this period, these programs came to be known 
collectively as the "Star Course," a nostalgic term still 
used by some Artist Series patrons. 

In 1925 an auditorium was added to Seibert Hall, a 
women's dormitory built in 1901. The auditorium served 
as a chapel and also provided new stage facilities which 
enabled the Star Course to present its first play, "Cotters 
Saturday night," in the 1925-26 season. After a lapse 
of several years, "The Violin Maker of Cremona" was 
given in 1930, and the Hedgerow Players of Philadel- 
phia performed at Susquehanna in 1934, 1935, and 
1937. The famous bandleader Edwin Franko Goldman, 
who apparently had been guest conductor for high 
school band festivals at the University some years 
earlier, also appeared as a lecturer in 1935. Occasional- 
ly, cultural programs were scheduled in the gymnasium 



WINTER 1974 



because of its greater seating capacity; this was the set- 
ting in 1938 for a concert by the Kryl Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

During the '40s and early '50s Star Course planners 
were fortunate and/or farsighted enough to include 
some soloists who have since become familiar to con- 
certgoers everywhere. Bernard Greenhouse, who gave 
a cello recital at Susquehanna in 1940 as a very young 
man, has since gained considerable recognition not only 
as a solo performer, but also as one-third of the Beaux 
Arts Trio of New York — their performance on campus 
was one of the real highlights of the 1972-73 Artist 
Series. Pianist Leonard Pennario played at the Univer- 
sity in 1946 and Ted Shawn, who became one of the 
great figures in American dance during his partnership 
with Ruth St. Denis and later as the founder of the 
Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts, pre- 
sented a lecture-recital in 1950. 

Galen Deibler, now associate professor of music 
and an outstanding pianist himself, became chairman of 
the Artist Series Committee (now Public Events Com- 
mittee, with increased responsibilities) in 1960, and it is 
probably more than coincidental that during his tenure 
some truly first-rate musicians were included in the 
Artist Series. The Juilliard String Quartet and mezzo- 
soprano Jennie Tourel appeared in 1961-62, actor Basil 
Rathbone and pianist Eugene Istomin in 1962-63, and 
baritone Hermann Prey and the New York Pro Musica 
in 1964-65. 

Deibler recently recalled that those Artist Series 
events were divided between Seibert Hall and Alumni 
Gymnasium, with the latter having to be especially set 
up for each program with a temporary stage and rows 
of chairs on the playing floor. The only exception was 
the Jennie Tourel concert, staged in the auditorium of 
the Selinsgrove State School which, for acoustical rea- 
sons, was not used again. 

As Susquehanna's enrollment began to grow sub- 
stantially in the early 1960s, the need for a larger 
auditorium was very evident. Daily chapel services 
were still being held at the time and attendance was 
required. When the student body outgrew Seibert, 
simultaneous services were scheduled in Benjamin 
Apple Theatre. The stage facilities in Seibert, while 
adequate for soloists and small groups, were too small 
for the kinds of other attractions — such as dance and 
theatre companies or symphony orchestras — sought by 
the Artist Series Committee. Even the University's own 
musical performing groups were forced to use tem- 
porary stage extensions for their concerts. Dressing 
room space was virtually nonexistent. Apple was a tiny 
theatre, ideal for the educational program but very 
limited both in stage and seating capacity for all but 
a minimum of public uses. 

Dr. Gustave Weber, who had come to Susque- 
hanna as President in 1959, thought long and hard 



about this obvious need. A church college without a 
real chapel, a fine music school without proper places 
to perform, a campus community eager to see and 
hear the artists of the world — but unsatisfactory facili- 
ties for presenting them. Was there some kind of 
building which could respond to this several-sided need 
all under one roof? After all, the future of required 
chapel was in some doubt even in those days, and 
Susquehanna was hardly affluent enough to support a 
separate chapel building which would be used only a 
few hours a week. 

Some solution had to be found. Board and staff 
members considered the problem too. The Lutheran 
Church with which the University identifies is a litur- 
gical church. The worship center should be visually 
uplifting and provide for flexibility in the forms of 
worship and the presentation of fine music from the 
rich heritage of the church. A portable altar to be 
rolled out for services would not suffice. 

Dr. Weber confesses that at one point he was 
trying to visualize a large auditorium with a stage at 
one end and a chancel at the other, with seats which 
would rotate or have adjustable backs — perhaps similar 
to the old streetcar or commuter-train seats which 
could be made to face either way depending upon the 
direction of the particular trip. His thoughts crystal- 
lized, however, at the New York World's Fair in 1963 
when he saw the Chrysler pavilion with its large, ro- 
tating exhibit platform for automobiles. There were such 
things as revolving stages; why not one with a chancel 
on half of it? The idea of a Chapel Auditorium with a 
revolving stage now began to take serious shape. 

"We met with the people from Chrysler and when 
the Fair was dismantled they were willing to give us 
the rotating platform," Dr. Weber recalls. "But after 
more consideration, it appeared to be somewhat too 
small for our purposes and the cost of taking it apart, 
moving it to Selinsgrove and reassembling it would 
have been more than $250,000." 

The question of seating capacity was another key 
factor in the design of a new building. The first figure 
was 750 seats. As the planning progressed and projec- 
tions of future enrollment kept going higher and higher, 
the proposed seating capacity was increased to 1000, 
then to 1250, and finally to 1500 (actually, 1506). 
Inclusion of the circular revolving stage, and the fact 
that curved walls do not trap sound to hinder acoustics, 
were major influences in the final design of the cir- 
cular structure. 

Ground was broken for the new Chapel Audi- 
torium in the summer of 1965, a datestone ceremony 
was held in the fall, and the building was dedicated on 
November 6, 1966. Since it was thought unusual for a 
college to have an auditorium with a seating capacity 
greater than its student enrollment, some skeptics 
doubted that it would ever be filled except for com- 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



mencement exercises. These doubts were soon dispelled, 
however, as the dedication itself attracted two over- 
capacity crowds — one for a morning service and the 
other for the afternoon convocation — and every seat 
was occupied for the first Christmas Candlelight Festi- 
val the following month. 

In his dedication address — a stirring and scholarly 
appeal for integrity in the arts — actor Efrem Zimbalist 
Jr. had cited Chapel Auditorium as a place "where 
worship and the performing arts may flourish together 
as they were wont to do of old." This flourishing to- 
gether began almost immediately when the new facility 
became the setting for several Artist Series events, 
band concerts, and the annual spring musical formerly 
presented in a large circus tent. The auditorium was 
frequently full for a variety of religious and secular 
programs including conventions and other outside 
rentals. The largest Artist Series attendance was a 
standing-room-only crowd of nearly 2000, not counting 
several hundred who had to be turned away, for the 
Royal Winnipeg Ballet on February 15, 1968. It is said 
that this was the first appearance ever in Snyder or 
Northumberland county of a full ballet company. 

But the real test was yet to come. Up until the 
fall of 1968, all Artist Series events and most student 
performances were open to the public free of charge. 
It remained to be seen whether the general public was 
willing to buy tickets. Traditonally, Artist Series fi- 
nancing was derived solely from student activities fees; 
by charging admission to the public, hopefully, sufficient 
additional funding could be secured to make it possible 
for the committee to book more attractive programs. 
So, the sale of tickets was initiated and special rates 
were established for season subscriptions. After an ad- 
mittedly slow start, and given a year or so to turn the 
extra money into bigger attractions, Artist Series attend- 
ance in 1970-71 averaged more than 1000 persons per 
program and people from Selinsgrove and the surround- 
ing communities were coming out in truly significant 
numbers, attracted by such programs as the musical 
"You're a Good Man Charlie Brown," the Eastman 
Philharmonic, and Emlyn Williams in his portrayal 
of Charles Dickens. 

The sheer size of the new stage encouraged a wider 
variety of programs, too, since it can accommodate a 
full orchestra, large ballet or theatre company — an im- 
possibility in any other facility on campus except the 
gymnasium with its very poor acoustics. The public's 
response to ticket sales has definitely helped to fund 
the larger and more expensive attractions. In 1969-70 
the income from this source totaled $950, but in 1972- 
73 the figure had increased to $6000. 

The ability of the Artist Series to draw both cam- 
pus and community audiences creates a very favorable 
situation, in the opinion of Clyde Lindsley, Campus 
Center director and manager of the Public Events Com- 




Cellist Bernard Greenhouse with violinist Isidore Cohen 
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mittee since 1969. "Since an average Artist Series event 
attracts somewhere between 700 and 1000 people from 
the campus, we have between 500 and 800 seats to sell 
in the community, and this ticket income represents 
most of the increase in our budget. Also, Student Senate 
has continued to strongly support the Artist Series in 



WINTER 1974 




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SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



contrast to the state of affairs on some campuses where 
cultural funds have been cut. Our student attendance 
has increased because we can provide tickets to them 
at no charge beyond the activities fee they've already 
paid." 

During the past few years the Artist Series has 
included folksingers Pete Seeger and Mike Cooney, the 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band of New Orleans, and a 
touring company of "Last of the Red Hot Lovers." 
These programs have helped to boost student enthu- 
siasm while at the same time sparking some conversa- 
tion as to what constitutes "culture" and what is enter- 
tainment. 

"Part of the recent success of the Artist Series is 
due to the fact that we have tried to present con- 
temporary programs like folk and jazz in addition to 
serious music, theatre, and dance," Lindsley adds. "Sev- 
eral years ago I heard an interesting talk by Prof. 
Charles Dodrill of Otterbein College. He suggested that 
too many campus cultural committees fail to present 
any 20th century programs like jazz or Broadway 
musicals, which are very much a part of our culture and 
are often the only 'cultural' things familiar to students 
— the primary audience we are trying to attract. People 
tend to shy away from the unfamiliar, and so each 
year we try to include at least one program which will 
have wide appeal for S.U. students, hoping that we can 
thereby interest them in attending the other programs 
too. The students are not only our primary constitu- 
ency now, but with others of their generation they 
will make up the concert audiences of tomorrow." 

The appeal of a varied cultural series is important 
to surrounding communities as well as the campus. 
The National Research Center of the Arts has recently 
published a study of public attitudes toward the arts 
and cultural participation in New York State entitled 
Arts and the People. It demonstrates that there is 
greater desire for artistic opportunities by a greater 



dors, writers, musicians — all 
rids of public figures have appeared 
" Susquehanna during the past decade 
kd a half. Here are just a few of 
lose whose names are most familiar 
(eft to right and top to bottom): 
\orman Cousins, Eugene lstomin, 
IcHenry Boatwright, Vincent Price, 
'illiam L. Shirer, James Farmer, Cesare 
alletti, Margaret Webster, Pete Seeger, 
enjamin Fine, Basil Ratlibone, Marilyn 
tason, Richard Dyer-Bennet, Ogden Nash, 
\rthur Schlesinger Jr., Jennie Tourel, 
'omit Basic, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., 
shley Montagu, Louis Untermeyer, 
ictor Riesel, Henryk Szeryng, Emmet 
ughes, Benjamin Spock, Dick Gregory. 



number of people than professional arts administrators 
ever thought, and indicates that those who seem most 
concerned about the lack of "cultural dimension" in 
their lives are those with a high school education or 
less, in the middle and lower economic levels. These 
people often feel that the arts are inaccessible to them 
and that existing cultural facilities and programs do 
not welcome their attendance or participation. 

Susquehanna has been working hard to change 
this attitude and welcome area people to events in 
Chapel Auditorium. About three weeks before each 
Artist Series performance, a student delivers posters 
and flyers to more than 60 banks, record stores, li- 
braries, and other locations in Selinsgrove and sur- 
rounding communities, and a mailing is sent to a list 
of area persons which has grown from about 500 
names to almost 4000 in four years. Ads are also 
placed with newspapers and radio stations, and this 
year three local stations began using a weekly taped 
announcement of University events which are open to 
the public in the upcoming week. 

These efforts have been very effective as the 1973- 
74 Artist Series is pulling more people from the com- 
munity than ever before. Season ticket sales reached 
334 — more than double the best previous total — and in 
the opening program, a touring company of the hit 
musical "Godspell" played to two capacity crowds on 
Saturday afternoon and evening, September 22. The 
National Shakespeare Company then drew more than 
1400, including about 40 percent of the student body, 
for its performance of "As You Like It" on November 
5. Hundreds of people are looking forward to the 
return engagement of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet on 
Tuesday, March 12. The season's other attractions are 
the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra on January 25 and the 
University of Illinois Jazz Ensemble on March 23. 

William Dawson, executive director of the Asso- 
ciation of College and University Concert Managers 
(which Susquehanna's Lindsley serves as a member of 
the Board of Directors), says, "Arts and the People 
negates the common attitude that the arts are for only 
a select few, and gives support to the belief that the 
live performance has greater potential popular support 
than television or movies. It indicates a potential audi- 
ence, as yet unserved, to whom our programs should 
have interest and value." 

Susquehanna's experience in Selinsgrove certainly 
bears out this view. The benefits deriving from the 
Artist Series — and other lectures and performances too 
— are not only a vital ingredient of the liberal arts edu- 
cation, but an important part of the cultural life of the 
area as well. The Public Events Committee of faculty, 
students, and administrators, currently chaired by Paul 
E. Klingensmith of the English Department, is to be 
commended for its efforts and success in bringing dis- 
tinguished talent to campus for the enrichment of all. 



WINTER 1974 




TAILGATING AT HOMECOMING 73 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




^*&*$$g$te 




Susquehanna's first scheduled Tailgate Picnic was 
rained out at Homecoming '72, but this year was dif- 
ferent. The weather was fine and several hundred per- 
sons settled down for a great pre-game meal, with the 
Marching Brass and Percussion providing appropriate 
music for the occasion. Crusader tailgaters haven't yet 
reached the level of enthusiasm seen at Penn State or 
the Minnesota Vikings' stadium, but bigger things are 
on the way. 

Meanwhile, the Susquehanna soccer team garnered 
a good bit of enthusiasm for itself — with a large crowd 
on the sidelines — as it defeated Upsala College 5-1 on 



its way to its best season ever (read more about those 
guys in SU Sports, page 28). That's freshman Don 
Schreiber of Rumson, N.J. getting a crack at the ball. 
The cross country harriers won over York 21-40 and 
the football team bowed to Western Maryland 14-11. 

The Homecoming Court was a winner, too, and 
included (above): Lady-in-waiting Zona Weimer '74 
of Millerstown, Pa.; Queen Carol Kehler '74 of Ash- 
land, Pa.; Karen Wells '75 of Stowe, Pa.; Patricia Os- 
terhout '76 of Murray Hill, N.J.; Lorraine Miller '77 of 
Haledon, N.J. Queen Carol is a political science major 
and president of Alpha Delta Pi sorority. 



WINTER 1974 



11 






Jm ... 
TER FLATT ' ; A 



After-game features this year were a Foam On The 

Range party at the home of Jim '64 and Toby 

Brodisch Skinner '63 and an evening 

concert bv Lester Flatt and the Nashville Crass. 



f^Z 



12 



President Weber inducts Bob Pittello '51 into 
the Sports Hall of Fame while Bill Moore '63 
awaits his turn and (at right) congratulates 
Dan Travalet '66, the third inductee. 




FROM 




E CLASS OF 1973 



Once again, the Alumnus is pleased to present a firsthand report on the activities and 
whereabouts of Susquehanna's most recent graduates. The Class of 1973 totals 289 
men and women, of whom 206 responded to the Alumni Office query. As is generally 
and understandably the case, the majority are living in the Middle Atlantic States — 
103 in Pennsylvania, 31 in New Jersey, and 17 in New York. Twenty-three other 
states are represented as places of residence and three of the '73ers live in other 
countries. As for their current occupations: 65 are in business, banking or insurance; 
50 are doing graduate work; 34 are teaching; 23 are in accounting. Only 6 are full-time 
homemakers, 6 in service occupations, and 3 in the armed forces. The variety of 
other occupational fields reported includes music, science, legal work, politics, and 
computer programing. — editor 



Barbara L. Albright: Front office 
secretary/personnel, Ambassador Ho- 
tel, Washington, D.C. 

Maren A. Henderson: Homemaker. 

Steven E. Arnold: Legal assistant, 
Day, Berry & Howard, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Jane Ann Barnes: Elementary vocal 
teacher, Interboro school district, 
Norwood, Pa. 

Steven R. Bateson: Staff account- 
ant, Ernst & Ernst, Richmond, Va. 

Kenneth G. Bechtold Jr.: 7-8 grade 
math teacher, West Essex Regional 
H.S., North Caldwell, N.J. 

June Belletti George: Management 
training program, State Farm In- 
surance Co., Springfield, Pa. 

James L. Bergen: Math teacher, 
Montoursville (Pa.) area school 
district. 

Robert J. Bleazey: Junior account- 
ant, Triangle Conduit & Cable Co., 
New Brunswick, N.J. 

William E. Bond: Research pro- 
grammer, Wyeth Laboratories, Rad- 
nor, Pa. 

Constance L. Bowers: University of 
Denver College of Law working 
toward M.S. in judicial ad- 
ministration. 

Jean R. Boyer: Graduate student, 
Dickinson School of Law. 

Ray H. Boyer: Supervisor trainee, 



United Parcel Service, Sunbury. 

Timothy E. Braband: Director of 
music, Atonement Lutheran Church, 
Wyomissing, Pa. 

Robert M. Brenneman: Tax 
auditor, Internal Revenue Service, 
Baltimore. 

Carol A. Bringman: Graduate 
study in guidance counseling, Penn 
State University. 

Steven L. Brinser: Audit staff, 
Price Waterhouse & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

James T. Brotherton: Management 
trainee. National State Bank, 
Elizabeth, N.J. 

Kathleen Brown Zupko: Graduate 
work, medical technology program, 
Franklin School of Science and Arts, 
Philadelphia. 

Linda S. Brown: Teaching the 
perceptually impaired. Manalapan- 
Englishtown (N.J.) Regional school 
district. 

Thomas S. Brownback: Teaching 
emotionally disturbed children, 
Montgomery County school system, 
Norristown, Pa. and graduate work in 
psychology, Temple University. 

Karen J. Buehler: New York 
University Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences, and working at the 
University's Institute o f En- 
vironmental Medicine, Tuxedo, N.Y. 



Thomas G. Burns: Band director, 
West Snyder Jr/Sr H.S. Midd-West 
school district, Beaver Springs, Pa. 

William D. Burrell: Investigator, 
State Public Defender of N.J., Essex 
Adult Region, Newark, N.I. 

Allison Butts Smith: Working 
towards the M.A. in U.S. history, 
SUNY at Binghamton. 

Pamela J. Carolan: Secretary, Cor- 
poration Counsel, luvenile Branch, 
Washington, D.C. 

Kathleen Chambers Callaghan: 
Homemaker. 

Vicki C. Chin: Assistant trainee, 
data processing staff of Chesapeake & 
Potomac Telephone Co., Silver 
Spring, Md. 

Peter S. Ciszak: Vice president and 
production coordinator, Stanley 
Ciszak Inc., mechanical contractors in 
Carteret, N.I. 

B. Jeffrey Claycomb: Sales 
representative, Crown American 
Corp., for Uniontown (Pa.) Holiday 
Inn. 

Michael E. Collins: Assistant na- 
tional bank examiner. Regional Ad- 
ministrator of National Banks, 
Philadelphia. 

Roger T. Collins: Teaching the 
retarded and emotionally disturbed, 
lohn Umstead Hospital, Butner, N.C. 

David A. Coryell: Graduate assis- 



WINTER 1974 



13 



tant, Mansfield State College. 

Keith J. Cosiello: Management 
trainee, Hershey Foods Corp., 
Hershey, Pa. 

Ronald J. Cressman: Accountant, 
executive training program, Bethlehem 
Fabricators Inc. 

James L. Culpepper: Master's in 
business administration program, 
Tulane University. 

David D. Dagle III: Bookkeeper, 
J.C. Decker Co., Montgomery. Pa. 

Diane Lewis Decker: French and 
English teacher. Central Fulton 
school district, McConnellsburg. Pa. 

Carol A. Dickinson: Administrative 
trainee. Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U.S., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Robert S. Dordick: Graduate study 
at St. Josephs College, Philadelphia, 
on a chemistry teaching assistantship. 

Dennis L Eckman: Marketing 
management trainee, Williamsport 
(Pa.) Division of Burroughs Corp. 

Robert G. Edgerton Jr.: Graduate 
study in hospital administration, 
George Washington University. 

J. Richard Edwards Jr.: Staff ac- 
countant, Price Waterhouse & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Jane A. Egbert: Input-output 
auditor, San Giorgio Macaroni Inc., 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Karl W. Eickhoff: Grocery 
manager, Shop'N Bag Super Market. 
Willingboro, N.J. 

Paula M. Eletto: Legal and Tax 
Department of Burndy Corp., 
Norwalk, Conn. 

Claudia B. Eppley: Quality Con- 
trol, New Jersey Dairy Laboratories, 
New Brunswick. 

James M. Evans: Substitute 
teacher, Line Mountain Sr. H.S., 
Dalmatia, Pa. 

Ann L. Fairchild: Computer pro- 
grammer, General Accident Insurance 
Company, Philadelphia. 

SueEllen Ferman Vayda: Instruc- 
tional aide (tutoring), Monroe 
Township School, Selinsgrove area 
school system. 

Nancy L. Finan: The National 
State Bank, Middlesex (N.J.) County. 

Henry R. Fisher: One-year M.B.A. 
program. University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Business. 

Martha A. Fisher: Executive 
Trainee, Sears Roebuck & Co., Glen 
Burnie, Md. 

David G. Fleming: Accountant. 
Peirce Phelps Inc., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Pamela Flinchbaugh Byrnes: Gen- 



eral music teacher (grades 2-5). Jop- 
patowne Elementary School. Joppa, 
Md. 

James J. Flynn: Parole agent, 
Pennsylvania Board of Probation and 
Parole, Allentown. 

Grover C. Foehlinger Jr.: Staff, 
Camp Mt. Luther, organist at Trinity 
Lutheran Church. Milton. Pa., and a 
substitute teacher. 

John C. Foltz: H.S. band director, 
Elliottsburg. Pa. 

Thomas C. Foote Jr.: Junior ac- 
countant, C.P.A. firm of Palmer & 
Co.. Easton, Pa. 

2/Lt Sylvia M. Ford: Extended ac- 
tive duty, stationed at Marine Corps 
Headquarters. Washington. D.C. 

Linda Fox Holler: Graduate study 
with an assistantship. Bucknell 
University. 

Roberta Fulton Duceman: Teach- 
ing French. Middle School. Palmyra 
(Pa.) area school district. 

Charles P. Gallagher: Administra- 
tive assistant. Girard Bank, Philadel- 
phia. 

Leslie B. Gamble Jr.: Graduate 
study, Penn State University, working 
toward M.S. in recreation and parks 
specializing in camp and outdoor 
education. 

Chris A. George: Ceramic tile and 
marble contractor, Overbrook Tile 
Co.. Philadelphia. 

Ens. Kevin W. Gibson: U.S. Navy 
communications officer, Great Lakes, 
111. 

Raymond C. Gillin: Graduate 
study. Westminster Theological 
Seminary. Philadelphia, and manager 
of market research. Joseph T. Fewkes 
& Co., Cherry Hill, N.J. 

Kathleen F. Gloster: Child care 
therapist. The Lynch Home (for pro- 
foundly retarded children). Willow 
Grove, Pa. 

Gary G. Goehringer: Staff auditor. 
First Pennsylvania Corp., 
Philadelphia. 

Ruth Grammes Irons: Music teach- 
er, Stafford Elementary School Mana- 
hawkin. N.J. 

Lynn R. Grant: 7th grade math 
teacher. Mendham (N.J.) Township 
Middle School. 

Arlene Graybill Apple: Home- 
maker. 

William D. Greenlee: Graduate 
study. Temple University School of 
Pharmacy. 

Douglas S. Griese: Management 
trainee. The Bank of New Jersey, 
Moorestown. 



Betsy Haas Polakiewicz: Tampa 
(Fla.) Tribune-Times. 

Ro.xie Hahn Thompson: Secretary 
in the admissions office, Duke 
University Medical School. 

Richard E. Hall: Accounts 
receivable clerk. International 
Harvester Co., Menands. N.Y. 

William H. Hamilton: Staff ac- 
countant. Price Waterhouse & Co., 
New York City. 

Mary Hamlen Mayer: First Na- 
tional Bank of Allentown. Pa. 

Paid H. Hartman: Broadcasting, 
WMLP-AM FM. Milton, Pa. 

Donna Heckard Peiffer: Home- 
maker. 

Anne L. Herdle: Graduate study, 
University of Pittsburgh, working 
toward M.A. in teaching with in- 
ternship year at Allegheny Academy. 

Linda Herrold Brophy: Instruc- 
tional aide (tutoring), Chapman 
Union Elementary School, 
Selinsgrove area school district. 

Mary Hess Lyle: Graduate work in 
advanced math, Lehigh University, 
with a teaching assistantship. 

Linda E. Hesse: Staff accountant, 
Haskins & Sells, New York City. 

Cynthia I. Himsworth: Assistant in- 
vestor, First Pennsylvania Bank, 
Philadelphia. 

Ellen Hindman: Now in Atlanta. 
Ga., after considerable traveling and 
temporary clerical work in Boston. 

Laurel Newton Hinkley: Paralegal 
work in pension and profit sharing. 
Maryland National Bank, Trust 
Department. Baltimore. 

Shirley E. Hollinger: Latin teacher, 
Lower Dauphin Jr. H.S., Hum- 
melstown. Pa. 

Elizabeth Hollingshead Lancione: 
Service representative. Liberty Mutual 
Insurance Co., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Gail S. Holmes: Math teacher. 
Central Bucks H.S.. Doylestown, Pa. 

Ronald J. Holmes: Senior technical 
assistant, Bell Laboratories, Allen- 
town, Pa. Also doing graduate work 
at Lehigh University. 

Fred G. Hooper: Vocal music 
teacher. Selinsgrove Area Joint H.S., 
and a chorister with the Susquehanna 
Valley Chorale. 

Nancy A. Hough: Inventory 
management specialist. Department of 
the Navy, Aviation Supply Office, 
Philadelphia. 

Lynn C. Hughes Potor: Teacher's 
aide. Selinsgrove State School and 
Hospital. 

Kathleen L. Hummel: English 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




For the second year in a row, Selinsgrove experienced an 
old-fashioned White Christmas decor. Dozens of curbside trees were 
covered with homemade ornaments and every parking meter was turned 
into a giant lollipop — incapable of guzzling coins! 



teacher, Warwick H.S., Lititz. Pa. 

Donald R. Jacke: Systems analyst, 
New Jersey Bell Telephone Co., 
Newark. 

Robert T. Kassoway: Administra- 
tive aide to Pennsylvania State Rep- 
resentative Lester K. Fryer. 

Douglas W. Katlr. Planning and 
control, Cosmair Inc., Clark, N.J. 

James E. Kellerman: Administra- 
tive trainee. Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of U.S., Dayton, Ohio. 

Ray W. King: Staff accountant, 
Coopers & Lybrand, Baltimore. 

Dorothy J. Knauss: Purchasing 
agent. Laurelton State School and 
Hospital, and organist-choir director 
at Wesley United Methodist Church, 
Mifflinburg, Pa. 

Marilyn Lacko Stevens: Graduate 
study. University of Florida, 
Gainesville. 

Emilio A. Lancione: Technical 
representative. Burroughs Corp., Har- 
risburg. 

David S. Landis: Accountant, 
Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton 
University. 

Donald G. Leffler: Staff account- 
ant, Arthur Anderson & Co., Phila- 
delphia. 



Thomas E. Leffler: Cost account- 
ant, Ingersoll Rand Co., Allentown, 
Pa. 

Joseph D. Long: Graduate study, 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg. 

Anne C. Longenberger: Recep- 
tionist, Foodcraft Dairy, Sunbury. 

Cynthia J. Lorenz: Graduate study 
in special education, Utica College, 
and working in the accounting depart- 
ment, Agway Inc., New Hartford. 
N.Y. 

Anne Lucas Bateson: Working 
toward M.S. in occupational therapy. 
Medical College of Virginia 'Virginia 
Commonwealth University. 

Edward G. Madison: Management 
trainee. East River Savings Bank. 
New York City. 

Joan Magill Hoffman: Secretary. 
Aetna Life Insurance Co., Harrisburg. 

Paul M. Marecek: Product 
development section, GTE Sylvania, 
Montoursville. Pa. 

Don E. Martz: Partner, Martz's 
Game Farms near Sunbury. 

Ronald G. Meixsell: Choral music 
teacher. Shoreham Wading River 
Middle School, Shoreham, N.Y. 



Georgeann Mercincavage Ruhl: 
Auditor, international public ac- 
counting firm of Coopers & Lybrand, 
Philadelphia. 

Robert C. Miller: Graduate study. 
Duquesne Law School. 

Kenneth L. Miner: Systems pro- 
grammer 'analyst, Bucknell Universi- 
ty- 

Frederick L. Mirbach Jr.: Graduate 
study in dramatic arts, The 
Neighborhood Playhouse. 

Yiu Dick Mo: Graduate study, 
New England Conservatory of Music. 

Nancy L. Moir: Secretary, United 
Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association, 
Washington, D.C. 

Kathleen A. Moriarty: Translater 
at the Deutscher Bank of Stuttgart 
Foreign Exchange in Germany. 

Gale Moore Tuomisto: Science 
teacher. Susquehannok H.S., Glen 
Rock, Pa. 

Thomas J. Moran: Graduate study. 
SUNY at Albany. 

Douglas W. Morgan: Graduate 
study in biochemistry and research 
assistant. University of Missouri. 

David W. Morris: Graduate work 
in elementary education, Lehigh 
University. 

Dennis G. Moseby: Graduate study 
and graduate assistant in nuclear 
engineering, Penn State University. 

Margaret Muir Ryan: Grade 11 
English teacher, Cresskill (N.J.) H.S. 

Janet A. Nilssen: Graduate student 
in school psychology, University of 
Bridgeport. 

Richard T. Nornhold Jr.: Teacher. 
Warrior Run school district, Turbot- 
ville, Pa. 

Robert C. Otto: Zone contact man 
for midwest region, distribution 
department of General Motors Truck 
& Coach Division, Pontiac, Mich. 

Philip C. Ousley: Physics teacher, 
Kingston, N.Y. 

Earl W. Paine II: Instrumental 
music teacher, Wissahickon school 
district. Ambler, Pa. 

Theresa Palmer Tracy: Service 
representative, Chesapeake & Potomac 
Telephone Co., Washington, D.C. 

David D. Perrine: Sales represen- 
tative, duplicating products division of 
3M Corp., Trenton. N.J. 

Robert G. Philips: Supervisor assis- 
tant. Metropolitan Federal Savings, 
Philadelphia. 

Susan Phillips Apfelbaum: Assis- 
tant director, Neighborhood Youth 
Corps, Sunbury. 

John M. Pavarnik: Master's can- 



WINTER 1974 



15 



didate in piano performance, he 
studied at Temple University for 
three months and is now at the Col- 
ogne Academy for Music in Germany 
under a one-year Rotary Foundation 
fellowship. 

Charles W. Polm: Graduate study, 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg. 

Joseph P. Raho: Graduate study, 
Fairleigh Dickinson University. 

Marly n I. Rath: Graduate work in 
operations research, Stanford 
University. 

Deborah Griesemer Reifsnyder: 
Commercial Credit Corp., Reading, 
Pa. 

Richard K. Renn: Graduate study. 
University of Baltimore Law School. 

Teresa M. Rhoderick: Working 
toward master's degree in woodwinds 
on a university fellowship at Ohio 
State University. 

Bruce A. Rogers: Performing in 
concerts and working toward a 
recording contract with original 
music. 

Richard D. Rowlands: Graduate 
study, Indiana University at Bloom- 
ington. 

John M. Ruginis: Graduate study, 
Temple University School of 
Pharmacy. 

Susan J. Ruttenher: Rutgers 
University Graduate School of 
Library Service. 

Steven C. Ryan: Staff accountant, 
Price Waterhouse & Co., New York 
City. 

Linda G. A. Saldukas: Organic 
research chemist, Merck & Co., 
Rahway, N.J. 

William A. Sanders: Branch 
management trainee, Girard Bank & 
Trust Co., Philadelphia. 

Mary jane Schirm Phillips: Auditor, 
Health. Education & Welfare Audit, 
Philadelphia. 

Paul L. Schoff stall: Graduate 
study, Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg. 

John W. Schroder: Laboratory 
technician, trainee for medium 
purification head, Litton Bionetics 
Inc., Frederick, Md. 

Peter R. Schuessler: Counselor, 
Odyssey House Agency, New York 
City. 

Nancy A. Search: Music teacher- 
band director, Jemez Springs school 
district, N. Mex. 

Nancy J. Searfoss: Mathematics 
teacher, Middleburg (Pa.) H.S. 

James A. Senger: Working toward 



M.S. in environmental studies. 
University of Montana. 

Pamela Shay Eickhoff: Credit in- 
vestigator. Provident Bank of New 
Jersey, Willingboro. 

Jordan A. Shenefield: Automobile 
area manager, Zayre Inc., Birm- 
ingham, Ala. 

Alice M. Shue: Elementary vocal 
and instrumental music teacher, Red 
Lion (Pa.) area school district. 

Robert S. Siegel: Management, 
Johanna Farms Dairy', Flemington, 
N.J. 

Thomas R. Sliker: Staff account- 
ant, Price Waterhouse & Co., New 
York City. 

Debra A. Snyder: Elementary vo- 
cal music teacher. Northeastern school 
district, Mt. Wolf. Pa. 

Eric E. Stahl: Salesman, Paul 
Stine-Chevrolet Inc., Selinsgrove. 

J. Donald Steele Jr.: Staff ac- 
countant, Ernst & Ernst, Philadelphia. 

Barbara Stetter Mangle: Music 
teacher, 1-8, Cape Breton County 
Schools, Sydney, Nova Scotia. 

John A. Strawoet: Teacher intern 
and graduate work in elementary 
education, Lehigh University. 

Judy Stump Kling: Assistant tour 
director, Conestoga Tours, Lancaster, 
Pa. 

Stephen P. Stupp: Anticipating a 
laboratory assistantship in Albu- 
querque, N. Mex. 

Glenn B. Sweetman: Graduate 
study. University of Baltimore Law 
School. 

William E. Thomas: OCC Marine 
Corps, Quantico, Va. 

Peter Y. Thompson: Executive 
recruiter specializing in finance and 
accounting. Finast Associates, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 

Susan D. Topfer: Elementary vocal 
music teacher, Newtown, Conn. 

Donna Tryner Coffee: Homemaker 
with plans for graduate work in a 
year or two. 

Roy S. Tuomisto: Production super- 
visor, Hanover Brands Inc., Hanover, 
Pa. 

Nancy Uckert Lewis: Clerk-typist, 
mortgage department. American Bank 
& Trust Company of Pennsylvania, 
Reading. 

James R. Upson: Sales represen- 
tative. Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Co., Wilmington, Del. 

Craig C. Urie: Vice president. 
Donald J. Urie Associates, V'ineland. 
N.J. 

Joseph M. Vayda: Installment loan 



department. Snyder County Trust Co., 
Selinsgrove. 

Robert C. F. Veach: Graduate 
study in physical therapy, University 
of Pennsylvania. 

William A. Visscher: Assistant, J. 
R. McFarland, organbuilder, Selins- 
grove. 

Robert G. Vogel: Organist-choir 
master, Zion Lutheran Church, Pen- 
brook, Pa. 

Thomas N. Vultee: Management 
trainee. Grand Way, East Paterson, 
N.J. 

Larry S. Walters: Human service 
aid. Migrant Project, Pennsylvania 
Department of Health, Sunbury. 

Linda Walton Senger: Homemaker. 

Jean Walton Lehman: In charge of 
several chorus and guitar classes, 
Spartanburg, S.C. 

William M. Weary: Credit con- 
troller. Bowman's Department Store, 
Harrisburg. 

Nevin Metz Weaver: Assistant ex- 
ecutive of exploring division, Boy 
Scouts of America. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Douglas C. Webb: Director of 
housekeeping. Service Master 
Hospital Corp.. assigned to Manhasset 
Medical Center Hospital, Manhasset, 
N.Y. 

Andrew E. Weitzenkorn: Carpen- 
ter, Moore Construction Co., Marble, 
Colo. 

Cheryl A. Wolchek: Graduate 
study in Spanish literature, New York 
University. 

Janice M. Woltjen: Graduate study 
in education. Lehigh University. 

Susan Woltz Waters: Assistant 
purchasing agent, North & Judd Co., 
Middletown. Conn. 

Marcia B. Wright: Graduate study 
in community hospital laboratory 
management, Fairleigh Dickinson 
University and Community Medical 
Center, Norristown, N.J. 

Gerold M. Wunderlich: Graduate 
study in art history, University of 
Delaware. 

Roberta K. Wyatt: Graduate stu- 
dent in political science. Drew- 
University. 

Rebecca Young Dagle: Activities 
director. Methodist Home, Lewisburg. 
Pa. 

Alyce L. Zimmer: Graduate study 
at the University of Pittsburgh with a 
fellowship in organic chemistry and a 
teaching assistantship. 

Raymond A. Zlockie: Industrial 
relations representative. American 
Car & Foundry, Milton, Pa. 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



THE LOCAL SCENE 



by GEORGE TAMKE 



We're well aware that many alumni are interested in 
what goes on in Selinsgrove. After all, they lived here for 
four years while they were students and some developed 
a real affection for the town and the area. From time to 
time the Alumnus has published items about local activi- 
ties, but we're going to try something new by using this 
column to share with our readers things they might like to 
know about the local scene. 

We'll keep the column flexible — some subjects may be 
directly connected with Susquehanna and some may not. 
And it probably won't be written by the same person every 
time. We have several people in mind who would make 
great guest columnists and we intend to use them if we can! 
Meanwhile . . . 

A good way to start is to take a little tour downtown. 
You'll have to make your own reference points, depending 
upon just when you lived here yourself, but it is clear that 
a lot has changed in the old boro which was founded by 
Major Anthony Selin. a Swiss soldier-of-fortune under 
Washington, in 1787. For our part, we've certainly seen 
many changes since we first came nearly 15 years ago. In 
fact, so many Market Street stores have been replaced with 
others, and replaced again, that we won't even try to docu- 
ment them all. Among the more striking, however: gone 
are the A&P and Weis Markets, the movie theatre, Troxell's 
Hardware. Mary Penny's, Lyons, Snyder's, Snavely's, Mel- 
rose Restaurant. Higgins. Cole's Drugs. Learn's, and others. 
In their stead we find such establishments as an enlarged 
Rea & Derick's and Ebert's 5 & 10. Western Auto, The 
Lowly Clothier, Susquehanna Hobbies, J. Kleinbauer Gen- 
tlemen's Furnishings. Kay Koch Feminine Finery, Joan 
Harvey's Gift Shop. Davis Drugs, The Shambeau, and a 
couple of small boutiques. Some of these places of busi- 
ness were illustrated in the Alumnus a year ago (Winter 
issue 1973. "Selinsgrove's White Christmas"). Things do 
look different on Market Street, and they look better all 
the time as the merchants and the planners follow their 
18th century styling in construction and renovations. 

Just off Market Street, the boro has its own new 
building on the site of the old Pine Street School — it in- 
cludes the community library too, which used to be in the 
Masonic building. Up at Market and Mill. St. Paul's United 
Church of Christ occupies its brand new sanctuary on the 
same spot where the old one stood. The Lutherans, if you 
haven't heard, finally consolidated First and Trinity 
churches three years ago and voted to name the new 
congregation Sharon, which was the name of the original 
Lutheran church begun in 1790 and split by a doctrinal 
squabble in 1843. Sharon is using both buildings — one for 
six months and the other for six months — while a study 
committee examines the program and the needs for the 
future. 

Weis Markets has a big store at the corner of Broad 
Street and Route 522, next to the present elementary school, 
which is next to the high school. A new middle school is 



currently under construction to the west and will complete 
the public school complex or, as they refer to it these 
days, the campus. 

And on the Isle of Que. Sheetz Market is no more. 
Completely devastated by the summer flood of '72, it never 
reopened — despite the fact that the town fathers had already 
reserved space on the zoning ordinance map for relocating 
the market upon its removal. You see, the old structure 
was right in the path of the proposed Routes 1 1 & 15 bypass 
and was to be razed anyway. Ah, the Bypass . . . 

When we first arrived in town in 1959, we learned 
that a bypass around Selinsgrove had been in the discussion 
stage for some years and there were those who thought that 
construction was "just around the corner." The highway 
north and south of the boro was first-class and, as part of 
a major traffic artery, carried as many as 50.000 vehicles a 
day at peak periods. Selinsgrove's narrow Market Street 
(it's about two miles from the bridge over Penn's Creek 
down to the junction of Route 35) was a bottleneck for 
through traffic north-south and south-north. Townspeople, 
of course, are as much concerned about the movement of 
in-town traffic as they are with the bottleneck. And the 
hundreds of trailer trucks which pass through each day 
don't help the condition of roads and foundations of build- 
ings either. Everyone — residents and merchants alike — has 
looked forward to the bypass for a long time. 

After additional years of engineering and design studies 
and surveys of traffic patterns, it was proposed that the 
Selinsgrove bypass begin just south of town and proceed 
around the west side of the boro limits, connecting to the 
north with a new highway west of heavily built-up 11 & 15 
(this section is called "the Golden Strip") and provide 
access to a new bridge across the Susquehanna River, re- 
placing the Bainbridge Street bridge to Sunbury. Thus, the 
bypass would become an important link in the entire con- 
nector system between the new Interstate highways. 

The goals have not been changed, but the route has. 
The plan which was finally adopted calls for the Selinsgrove 
bypass — beginning at the same point near the 35 junction — 
to cross over to the Isle of Que and proceed along the old 
canal bed, crossing back to 11 & 15 just north of the Penns 
Creek bridge. This plan was funded last year. It is said that 
it displaces fewer persons and will cost far less than the 
western route, although the link-up to the north will now 
necessitate an overpass. Designs for the next stages have 
been approved but no funds have yet been appropriated. 
In the case of the Selinsgrove section, the state has pur- 
chased the needed properties and clearing of the land has 
begun. A few months ago we were thinking it was in the 
bag. 

Now we're wondering. In light of present fuel shortages 
and since highway construction funds derive chiefly from 
gasoline tax revenues, to say nothing of a national reorder- 
ing of priorities — quite properly, under the circumstances — 
the Selinsgrove bypass just might become as elusive as ever. 



WINTER 1974 



17 



Zusquehannans On Parade 



'25 

The Rev. Robert J. Keeler, retired 
Lutheran pastor, is executive director 
of this year's United Way campaign in 
Centre County, Pa. 

'27 

Dewey S. Herrold is the first 
Snyder Countian ever knighted in the 
Red Cross of Constantine, one of the 
top honors in York Rite Masonry. A 
retired Weis Markets accountant, he 
is currently president of the Snyder 
County Historical Association and, as 
one of only three Pennsylvania Dutch 
columnists in the Commonwealth, has 
been the author for many years of 
"doh alt Deutsch Geischt" in The 
Selinsgrove Times-Tribune. 

The Rev. Bert E. Wynn is serving 
his sixth year as secretary of the Penn 
Central Conference, United Church 
of Christ. He retired from the active 
ministry in 1968. 

'28 

Dr. William C. Buss of Bakersfield, 
Calif, has retired as assistant health 
officer and director of communicable 
disease control for the Kern County 
Health Department after 38 years of 
county service. A medical graduate of 
Loma Linda University, he is widely 
known for his clinical work in 
venereal disease and is also a pub- 
lished authority on mosquito-borne 
encephalitis and cocidioidomycosis or 
valley fever. Among numerous pro- 
fessional honors and memberships, he 
is a diplomat of the American College 
of Preventive Medicine and Public 
Health. 

Sister Dorothy Goff is librarian and 
archivist of the Lutheran Deaconess 
Community at the Deaconess Center 
in Gladwyne, Pa. 

'29 

Dr. William H. Dreibelbis, senior 
physician of the medical staff, Moun- 
tain Top Area Medical Center, Snow 
Shoe, Pa., has been elevated to 
emeritus status after 38 years of 
service. He will continue to assist the 
medical staff and act in a consulting 
capacity. 



Gereon Wagner Salavan recently 
retired after 30 years on the staff of 
the Laurelton (Pa.) State School and 
Hospital. Holder of an M.S. in 
bacteriology from the University of 
Pennsylvania, she was in charge of 
the clinical laboratory, X-ray depart- 
ment, and electroencephalograms. 

'34 

P. Richard Fisher is acting 
superintendent of the Milton (Pa.) 
Area School District for the current 
year. He was formerly senior high 
school principal. 

D. Edgar Hutchison of Camp Hill, 
Pa., with Firestone Tire & Rubber for 
the past 28 years, became a part-time 
associate in development at Sus- 
quehanna University on January 1. 
His work is primarily in the area of 
bequests and deferred gifts. 

'35 

William B. Caruth, associate pro- 
fessor of music at Bluefield State Col- 
lege, is acting chairman of the 
division of fine arts at both Bluefield 
and Concord Colleges. He earned his 
M.M.Ed, from the University of 
Michigan. His wife, the former 
Elizabeth Shipe, teaches music in 
rural schools and their address is Box 
129, Athens, W. Va. 24712. 

Dorothy C. Eastep is president of 
Elementary Music Publications and 
Ruth Nay lor Shaffer '41 is secretary- 
treasurer. Dorothy lives at Seven 
Oaks East, Apt. 502, 302 East 
Marshall St., West Chester, Pa. 
19380. 

Dr. Ralph C. Geigle, a past presi- 
dent of the S.U. Alumni Association, 
has submitted his retirement resigna- 
tion as superintendent of schools in 
Reading, Pa., effective June 30, 1974. 
Highly regarded as an innovator, he 
has held the Reading post for 18 
years. 

Dr. Erie I. Shobert II, vice presi- 
dent-technology for the Stackpole Car- 
bon Co., delivered the keynote ad- 
dress, "The Art and Science of Mate- 
rials," at the annual Holm Seminar on 
Electric Contact Phenomena in Chi- 
cago in October. Vice chairman of the 
Susquehanna Board of Directors, he 



is also a past president of the Alumni 
Association. 

'45 

Virginia Walker Turner, a faculty 
member at Glenelg School of Music, 
is currently studying piano with Volya 
Cossack of New York City and 
Robert Drumm of Catholic Universi- 
ty. She lives with her husband and 
two children at 10241 Wesleigh Dr., 
Simpsonville, Md. 21046. 

'46 

Dr. Roswell J. Johns attended a 
Russian-American Health Conference 
last summer in Moscow and the 
Pavlov Institute of Psychiatry in Len- 
ingrad. His wife, the former Gayle 
Clark '47, and their three children 
joined him in touring the Soviet 
Union. 

'47 

Lenore Garman Horner received 
the Ed.D. degree in music education 
from Penn State University in August. 
She has also studied at Juilliard and 
Lebanon Valley and earned her M.A. 
from Columbia University. 

Dr. John R. Leach, graduate music 
coordinator and professor of music at 
Jersey City State College, is listed in 
the 1974-75 edition of "Who's Who in 
the East." He also has been reelected 
to a second term on the Board of 
Trustees of Upsala College. John was 
on Susquehanna's music faculty, 1950- 
59. He is married to the former Betty 
Miller. 

Dr. Ongkar Narayan is the author 
of "Bye Bye Mista," a novel about a 
school teacher who believes more in 
love than in discipline, just published 
by the Philosophical Library Inc.. 
New York. An English teacher at 
Bonnie Doon Composite H.S., Ongkar 
lives at 30 Menlo Crescent, Sherwood 
Park, Alberta, Canada. 

'49 

Evan Zlock and his partner won the 
men's doubles title of the Neshaming 
Tennis Club near Philadelphia in 
September. His wife, the former Fran 
Lybarger, and her partner won the 
women's doubles. Evan and Fran then 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Naravan '47 and Anderson '62 



went on to retain their mixed doubles 
championship. 

'50 

Louis F. Santangelo, public rela- 
tions director of Hershey Foods 
Corp., was elected president of the 
Central Pennsylvania Public Relations 
Society of America. 

'51 

John R. Sleiger is now financial 
director of the Far East/Latin 
American Division of Vick In- 
ternational Ltd. and has returned 
from Australia to corporate head- 
quarters in New York City. He and 
his wife, the former Lois Gordon '52, 
have four children. New address: 792 
N. Wilton Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
06840. 

'53 

V. Carl Gacono, a training con- 
sultant with Presidential Insurance in 
Fort Washington, Pa. and an Army 
Reserve Major, completed the com- 
mand and general staff officer course 
at the U.S. Army Command and 
General Staff College, Fort 
Leavenworth. Kans. 

Robert A. Mesler was promoted to 
the rank of Captain and serves in the 
Bureau of Naval Personnel, 



Washington, D.C., as head of the 
Navy Project Volunteer Branch 
which coordinates the Navy effort to 
maintain an all-volunteer force. He 
and his wife, the former Marjorie 
Way '52, live with their three boys at 
6711 Bracken Ct., Springfield, Va. 
22152. 

Major Carlton R. Howells received 
his master's degree from Ball State 
University last May in commence- 
ment exercises held at the General 
von Steuben Hotel, Wiesbaden, Ger- 
many, where he is stationed as a 
chaplain in tht U.S. Air Force. 

'54 

Ray Foor, vice president and 
stockholder of the Everett Hardwood 
Lumber Co. for the past 17 years, has 
accepted a call to become full-time 
student pastor of Trinity United 
Church of Christ, Mountville. Pa. He 
is continuing his studies toward the 
M.Div. degree at Lancaster Theologi- 
cal Seminary. 

Joyce K. Gilbert, assistant registrar 
at Susquehanna, went to Germany 
with her parents. Dr. and Mrs. Russell 
W. Gilbert, on a Pennsylvania 
German Society Heritage Tour. loyce 
is a veteran traveler but this was the 
first trip overseas for Dr. Gilbert, 
professor emeritus of German. 



'55 

Melva Schmeltz Vogler earned her 
M.S. in mathematics education from 
Marywood College. She teaches at 
Wallenpaupack (Pa.) Area H.S. Her 
husband is Harold E. Vogler '54. 

'56 

Lt Cmdr John D. Yeich is serving 
as chaplain at the Marine Corps Base, 
Twentynine Palms, Calif. He and his 
wife, the former Janet Gerner '56, 
and three children are residing at 
3713 Ashurst, MCB, Twentynine 
Palms, Calif. 92276. 

'58 

L. John Renshaw, former manager 
of Financial Control-Far East for In- 
ternational Telephone & Telegraph, 
has been named vice president-finance 
for SeaTrain Shipbuilding Corp., 
subsidiary of SeaTrain Lines, New 
York City. He lives in Darien, Conn, 
with his wife and two daughters. 

'59 

Ronald G. Aller is with the 
American Life Insurance Co. and 
lives with his wife, the former 
Barbara Angle x'61, and three 
children at 46 Bridlebrook Lane, 
Newark, Del. 19711. 

Jack E. Cisney, associate professor 
of business administration at West 




Dr. Charles Jones '35 looks over the last Alumnus with Alumni Relations 
Director Buss Carr '52. A surgeon with the Trust Territory of the Pacific 
Islands, Dr. Jones traveled 9000 miles each way from his home, on the 
island of Moen in the Truk Lagoon of the East Carolines, to attend Homecoming 
at Susquehanna. The magazine usually takes si.x months to reach him by mail. 



WINTER 1974 



19 



























f-~m+ml 




yi fvW 




wtaJI 










































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m 






A surprise visitor to campus in 
the fall was Amos Alonzo Stagg Jr., 

professor emeritus of physical 

education, who took time out to 
admire the Stagg Old Hat Trophy won 

for the eighth time in fourteen 

years by the Crusaders. The coveted 

award was fashioned from the felt 

hat worn by his father, the Grand 

Old Man of Football, when he 
co-coached at Susquehanna, 1947-52. 



Virginia Northern Community Col- 
lege, last summer attended the In- 
stitute for the Study of Comparative 
Politics and Ideologies at the 
University of Colorado on a full 
scholarship. He was also appointed to 
the American Accounting Associa- 
tion's National Committee on Com- 
munity and Junior Colleges. 

Raymond J. Kerstetter is now con- 
troller for U.S. Borax & Chemical 
Corp. on the West Coast. He, his wife 
and family live at 293 1 1 Whitley Col- 
lins Dr., Palos Verdes Peninsula, 
Calif. 90274. 

'60 

Lawrence W. Cuip is in charge of 
all vocal and instrumental music at 
Franklin School, Hasbrouck Heights, 
N.J. 



Dr. William A. Elmer assistant pro- 
fessor of biology at Emory Universi- 
ty, presented a seminar to the 
University of Connecticut Biological 
Sciences Group last spring and 
chaired a developmental biology 
paper session in Washington. D.C. His 
most recent publication was entitled 
"Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in 
Fetal Hind Limbs of the Mouse 
Mutation Brachypodism." 

'61 

Lee R. Conrad resigned his position 
with DuPont in Philadelphia to 
become associate materials engineer 
with AMP in Harrisburg. Lee is mar- 
ried to the former Caroline Shryock 
'60 and they are the parents of 
Susanne and Amy. 

'62 

Dorothy M. Anderson, dean of 
freshmen and associate dean of 
students at Susquehanna, is the newly- 
installed president of the Pennsylvania 
Association of Women Deans and 
Counselors. 

Rosemary Losch Beaver and her 
husband Lawrence are busy restoring 
their pre-Civil War farmhouse in Per- 
ry County. Pa. They are the parents 
of two young daughters. 

Leslie R. Butler is now vice presi- 
dent. International Banking Group of 
First Pennsylvania Bank in Phila- 
delphia. 

Thomas L. Hanshaw began his new 
duties in November as a school 
psychologist in Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

x'62 

Elwood B. Starr, who has been a 
forest engineer with the U.S. Forest 
Service in Alaska for several years, is 
now teaching and working toward a 
master's degree at Oregon State 
University. Corvallis, where he also 
earned his B.S. 

'63 

Dr. Michael Cordas Jr. is in private 
osteopathic practice at the Mid- 
dletown Medical Center and serves as 
medical director of the Alpine Retire- 
ment Center, Hershey, Pa. 

Donald A. Whitko has been pro- 
moted to master claims adjuster with 
Nationwide Insurance Co.. Reading, 
Pa. He is president of the 
Schwenksville Borough Council and 
just completed a term as president of 
Rotary. 



'64 

Dr. Terry L. Hand is medical direc- 
tor of the Civic Center Hospital 
Foundation-Rockridge Medical Care 
Center. Oakland. Calif. He is working 
on a vitamin-biochemical book for lay 
reading. 

The Rev. Alfred Ambrose resigned 
as associate pastor of Trinity 
Lutheran Church. Milton. Pa. to 
become administrator of the Lutheran 
Home at Kane, Pa. 

Dr. Harvey A. Horowitz completed 
his residency in psychiatry at the In- 
stitute of the Pennsylvania Hospital 
and has been appointed chief resident 
in adolescent psychiatry at the 
Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadel- 
phia. He lives with his wife and three 
children in suburban Wynnewood. 

The Rev. James T. Parks resigned 
as pastor of Abiding Peace Lutheran 
Church. Budd Lake. N.J. to become 
director of placement and testing at 
Davis & Elkins College. 

Patricia Hoehling Lundquist, most 
recently a program assistant at a 
children's camp for University Camps 
of UCLA, paid a visit to the Alumni 
Office on her way from California to 
her home in Bethesda. Md. 

The Rev. Richard A. Seaks is now 
pastor of St. Mark's Lutheran 
Church. Oakland. Md. He previously 
served for six years as associate pastor 
of Ascension Church. Towson, Md. 

x'64 

Tom Curtis is coordinator of sup- 
ply and distribution for the Pennzoil 
Oil Co. Address: Red Coach Manor. 
Apt. 4-B. Oil City, Pa. 16301. 

'65 

Arthur F. Bowen has purchased the 
real estate business of Percy Miller in 
Selinsgrove. 

Michael C. Carr is an engineer for 
Raytheon Co. in missile design and 
analysis, radar systems and systems 
security work. His wife is the former 
Diana Youngblood '66. 

George W. Fishel Jr. is vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the York 
Lincoln Mercury Co.. 1-83, York. Pa. 

Dr. William P. Forti is chief 
pediatric resident at Kline Children's 
Hospital in Harrisburg Polyclinic 
Hospital. He, his wife and two 
children live at 310 Erford Road. 
Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 

Dr. Paul V. Hartman is on the staff 
of the Department of Radiation 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Therapy at Yale University. He 
served his internship in surgery at the 
Mayo Clinic and completed residency 
training at Yale in 1973. 

Barry L. Lauver teaches chemistry 
at Severna Park H.S. and is a part- 
time staff teacher at Anne Arundel 
County Community College, Arnold, 
Md. 

Larry G. Erdman was awarded the 
master of engineering degree in 
engineering science by Pennsylvania 
State University. 

Joseph A. Gano is with the Bur- 
roughs Corp. in Atlanta. He and his 
wife are parents of Christopher and 
have moved into their new home at 
2342 Gale Dr., Norcross, Ga. 30071. 

'66 

Robert L. Duerr received the 
M.Ed, cum laude from Temple 
University. He is teaching math and 
science at Elkins Park Jr. H.S.. 
Cheltenham Twp., Pa. 

Christopher J. Gipe, recipient of 
the master's degree in counselor 
education from the University of 
Scranton, is associated with the 
psychology department at 
Hollidaysburg (Pa.) State Hospital, 
with concentration in psychological 
testing and therapy. 

Marilyn E. Eck is teaching English 
as a second language, science and 
math at the Franscon Christian H.S. 
of the Evangelical Christian Alliance 
in Swaziland. She wrote an interesting 
letter to the McGraths seeking 
sponsors for science and sports equip- 
ment and individual student support. 
Address: P.O. Box 1, Mhlosheni, 
Swaziland. Africa. 

J. William Gagne Jr. joined the law 
firm of Ritter & Berman in Hartford. 
Conn. His wife is the former Jean 
Wilkinson '67 and they live at 1144 
Boulevard, West Hartford. Conn. 
06119. 

Richard H. Streamer is a sales 
supervisor for Tasty Baking Co. He 
and his wife, the former Pamela Dick 
'65, and children live at 1337 Park 
Hills Ave., State College, Pa. 16801. 

John R. Trimmer was named assis- 
tant accounting manager. Optical 
Dispensing Group of Dentsply In- 
ternational with offices in York, Pa. 
The Trimmer family lives at 837 
Florida Ave., York. 

x'66 

Dr. Richard Mikesell, a clinical 
psychologist, is currently in private 



practice in the nation's capital. He 
and his wife reside at 3727 Yuma St. 
N.W., Washington. D.C. 

'67 

The Rev. H. Richard Bailey II has 
left Middletown, Pa. to accept a call 
to St. Paul's Lutheran Church in 
Penryn. His address is Box 9, Penryn, 
Pa. 17564. 

Donna Ake Burkholder, who 
teaches music at Ephrata (Pa.) Jr. 
H.S., earned her M.Ed, degree at 
Penn State University. She recently 
sang the second lead in the Manheim 
Little Theatre production of "Maine," 
with Susan Welty Ferrari conducting 
the orchestra and Marian Shatto one 
of the musicians. 

Robert B. Fowler, who has con- 
structed two American Outdoors cam- 
per resorts in Florida, has started a 
new corporation which is developing 
condominiums on the west coast of 
the Sunshine State. His wife is the 
former Jo Anne Hiatt and they live at 
1008 Dolphin Dr.. Cape Coral, Fla. 
33904. 

Edna M. Fricker received the 
master's degree in mathematics from 
Temple and is now studying toward 
her doctorate at Drexel University 
while teaching math at Cheltenham 
(Pa.) H.S. Edna's sister Joanne is an 
S.U. freshman majoring in math. 

James B. Wagner Jr. is in technical 
sales at Drew Chemical Corp., 
Syracuse, N.Y. He and his wife are 
the parents of a son and daughter. 

Charles A. Holmes is chemist for 
Handy & Harman. Fairfield, Conn in 
precious metal products and refining. 

x'67 

The Rev. David A. Williams is 
presently assistant minister at St. 
John's Church ("The Church of 
Presidents" ) at Lafayette Square, 
Washington, D.C. He went there 
directly after receiving his doctor of 
ministry degree from Andover 
Newton Theological School. His ad- 
dress is 429 Monticello Blvd., Alex- 
andria. Va. 22305. 

William H. Gehron III received his 
B.S. from Greensboro College and is 
a sales representative for Inventor's 
Diversified Sevices Inc., Williamsport, 
Pa. 

'68 

Dr. Martin W. Banschbach (Ph.D. 
in biochemistry and nutrition from 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute a year 



ago) is a post-doctoral research 
fellow at the J. P. Kennedy Jr. 
Laboratory. University of Wisconsin 
Medical Center. 

Jean Sawyer Mei.xsell is teaching 
violin at the Bloomingdale House of 
Music in New York City and working 
part-time for a Wall Street law firm. 

The Rev. Richard F. Michael 
resigned as pastor of Shell Lutheran 
Church, Shellsville. to accept the 
pastorate of Holy Spirit Lutheran, 
Lancaster. The Michaels now live at 
3131 Columbia Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 
17603. 

J. Gregory Ballentine earned his 
M.A. in guidance from Seton Hall 
University and is guidance counselor 
at Kenai (Alaska) H.S. 

James B. Nayduch was appointed 
special education work study 
coordinator for the Westwood, Mass. 
school district and is also a learning 
disabilities tutor with the Brookline 
public schools. 

A. Michael Weaver was transferred 
to Pittsburgh as manufacturing 
manager of new roof insulation 
urethane fiberglass for Owens Cor- 
ning Fiberglas Corp. He, his wife and 
son Scotty live at T-14 Forest Green 
Dr., Coraopolis, Pa. 15108. 

Evelyn War Grimes teaches guitar 
classes for the YMCA of Benton 
County. Ore. 

Dr. Frank C. Grenoble Jr. is a den- 
tist in the U.S. Navy stationed at 
Camp Lejeune, N.C. 

Dr. Richard Rex, optometrist, is 
now serving in the U.S. Army. 

'69 

Barry E. Bowen received his Ph.D. 
in analytical chemistry from the 
University of Florida. He is now a 
research chemist in the Polymer In- 
termediates Department of the E.I. 
DuPont de Nemours Co, Wilming- 
ton. His wife is the former Kathy 
Van Order '70 and they live at 2134- 
C Haven Rd., Wilmington, Del. 
19809. 

Stephen R. Herrold received two 
master's degrees from Georgia Tech 
— one in health physics and the other 
in nuclear engineering. He is now 
working at Susquehanna with Dr. 
Fletcher, professor of geology and 
director of the Institute For En- 
vironmental Studies. 

John F. Hilbish earned his M.S. in 
nuclear engineering from Penn State 
and, after six months in Singapore, 
has accepted a new post in nuclear 



WINTER 1974 



21 



physics with the Australian govern- 
ment. 

'70 

Keith N. Bahner has been ap- 
pointed vice president in charge of the 
remodeling and home improvement 
sales division for the Broscious 
Lumber Co. of Northumberland. Pa. 

Phillip G. Buchanan earned an 
M.S. in business administration from 
Penn State University. 

Margaret E. Isaacson, on the 
Career Services staff at Princeton 
University, is doing some graduate 
work at Rider College. Peggy was 
recently selected for membership in 
the American Poetry League which 
published her poem, "On a Parti- 
Colored Hillside." 

John H. Klemeyer received the 
J.D. degree from the University of 
Pittsburgh Law School and is 
associated with a law firm in Milford, 
Pa. His wife, the former Linda Maier 
71, teaches earth science and biology 
in the Delaware Valley school 
district, Port Jervis, N.Y. 

Linda Matthes Kraus and her hus- 
band are now in the Philippines where 
he is a communications maintenance 
officer at Clark AFB. Their address is 
Lt. & Mrs. Wm. G. Kraus. 1961 
Comm Group. Box 12808, APO San 
Francisco, Calif. 96274. 

Jane C. Wilson received her MA. 
in guidance and counseling from 
Rider College. She lives at 350 Taft 
St., Bristol. Pa. 19007. 

'71 

Edward W. Bogner entered Jef- 
ferson Medical College this year on a 
Weis Market, Inc. medical education 
scholarship. 

Janet Patten Bondi is a senior in- 
structor in the Department of 
Medicine (Pulmonary) of 
Hahnemann Medical College and 
Hospital. She is working on a project 
to develop a programmed learning 
system to teach medical students by 
using computers and sound-slide 
systems. 

Peggy Haas, who was awarded the 
M.S.M. from Union Theological 
Seminary in New York, directed her 
Episcopal Youth Choir from Rich- 
mond. Va. in a command 
performance at the White House in 
October. Gerald Ford, just nominated 
to become Vice President, was in at- 
tendance with President Nixon. 



Michael Bonner is attending Ohio 
Northern Law School and his wife, 
the former Valerie Fisher, is working 
as the Neighborhood Youth Corps 
director organizing a federally-funded 
program for disadvantaged high 
school students in three counties in 
Ohio. Their address is 221 E. 
University Ave., Ada. Ohio 45810. 

Whitney Gay is a salesman in the 
liquor division for C. Pappas In- 
ternational Enterprises. 

Karen L. Olson has joined the Air 
Force and after basic training will be 
a vocal soloist with the 724th Air 
Force Band stationed at McCord 
AFB in Tacoma, Wash. 

x'71 

Judith Allen Bodnaruk graduated 
from SUNY College at Plattsburgh 
after majoring in food and nutrition. 
She and her husband live at 111 E. 
Lewis Ave., Pearl River, N.Y. 1321 1. 

'72 

Robert C. Shiffer Jr. is a graduate 
teaching assistant in chemistry at the 
College of William & Mary working 
toward the master's degree. 

James Endrusick began graduate 
work at the Pennsylvania College of 
Optometry in September. 

Elaine Schall was appointed young 
adult librarian at the Osterhout 
Library in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. She 
received her master's degree in library 
science from the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Andrew Sherwood is a geography 
teacher in the Greencastle-Antrim 
(Pa.) school district. 

Brenda Armstrong Bartholomew is 
teaching French and German at 
Boyertown (Pa.) H.S. 

x'72 

Lynne Pawelko Heran is with 
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. in 
Hightstown, N.J. Husband Chris '70 is 
with E.R. Squibb & Sons, New 
Brunswick. 



"J DO" 



ROME 

IN MAY? 



SEE PAGE 31 



KING-McCABE 

Susan D. McCabe x'69 to Lawrence 
F. King. November 30. 1968. Susan is 
a bookkeeper. her husband a 
carpenter, both working for his father 
at Associated Builders Inc. P.O. 
Box 651. Ellsworth. Me. 04605. 
BRODIE-LANSDALE 

Virginia Lansdale x'71 to Robert 
Brodie. April 3. 1971. Virginia is con- 
tinuing her education at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania where her 
husband is completing his senior 
year. 566 Grant St.. Indiana, Pa. 
15701. 

TRACY-PALMER 

Theresa Palmer '73 to Frank An- 
drew Tracy, November 2 5 , 
1972 5101 Sargent Rd. N.E. 303, 
Washington, DC. 20017. 

THOMPSON-HAHN 

Roxie E. Halm 73 to Alan H. 
Thompson. December 17. 1972. I- 

10 Estes Parks Apts.. Carrboro, N.C. 
27510. 

MESSERSCHMIDT-GODSHALL 

Edith H. Godshall '65 to William 
I. Messerschmidt. March 31, 1973, 
Zion Lutheran Church, Tamaqua, Pa. 
Cherie Ayres '65 served as maid of 
honor. Edith is a reading specialist 
with the Hazleton area school district. 
Mr. Messerschmidt, a graduate of 
Williamson Institute, is a carpenter 
with Atlas Chemical Co. of Reynolds, 
Pa. Grier City. Barnesville, Pa. 
18214. 

WATERS-WOLTZ 

Susan E. Woltz '73 to Ronald C. 
Waters '71, May 5, 1973, Branford, 
Conn. Members of the wedding party 
included Nan Havens '73. Dorothy 
Muzzy '73 and Alan Waters '74. Ron 
is a junior accountant with the Euro- 
pean Banking Association. New York 
City. 11 Little River La„ Mid- 

dletown. Conn. 06457. 

SIEGEL-KRUTE 

Kathryn E. Krute to the Rev. 
Waller L. Siege! '66, May 19, 1973. 
Mrs. Siegel, a graduate of Wilkes Col- 
lege, is working toward her master's 
degree at Rutgers and is a member of 
the technical staff at Bell 
Laboratories, Whippany, N.J. Walt is 
pastor of First Presbyterian Church, 
Bloomsbury. N.J. 08804. 

PAGANO-PAHL 

Karla E. Pahl 72 to Ronald J. 
Pagano 72, June 9, 1973, Christ 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Memorial Lutheran Church, Malvern, 
Pa. Joan Finsen Waeldner 72 and 
Kevin Palil 76 were attendants. 
Ronald teaches history and coaches 
football and wrestling at Leetonia 
H.S. 975 East Third St.. Salem, 
Ohio 44460. 

GALLAGHER-YOST 

Jeanne H. Yost 72 to C. Patrick. 
Gallagher 73, June 9. 1973. Jeanne 
teaches first grade in an elementary 
school in Evesham Township. 17- 
A Evergreen Cir„ Maple Shade, N.J. 
08052. 

FECKER-STEVENS 

Jill Stevens 74 to George A. 
Fecker 72, June 14, 1973. George is 
an accountant. 716 N. Orange St., 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

McLAUGHLIN-SEAKS 

Susan E. Seaks 72 to Jerry B. 
McLaughlin. June 23, 1973. St. John 
Lutheran Church, Stewartstown, Pa. 
The bride's brother, the Rev. Richard 
A. Seaks '64, was one of the of- 
ficiants. Janean Clare 72 and Sharon 
Witteck 72 were soloists. Bonny Ens- 
inger Klinger 72 and Elaine Claar 72 
were members of the wedding party. 
Susan is doing graduate work at West 
Chester State College and her hus- 
band, a graduate of Drexel Universi- 
ty, is an electrical engineer with 
United Engineers & Construc- 
tors. Apt. 4, 415 Linden La., 
Media, Pa. 19063. 

PAPACONSTANTINOU- 
SINANOGLOU 

Marina Sinanoglou 70 to Nikos 
Papaconstantinou, June 30, 1973. 
Marina is teaching English at 
Anatolia. Mr. Papaconstantinou 
received the master's degree in in- 
ternational relations from American 
University and is currently serving in 
the Greek Army. Anatolia Col- 
lege, Thessaloniki. Greece. 
HILBISH-HAUBE 

Barbara Dale Haube to John F. 
Hilhish '69, July 5, 1973, Kathmandu, 
Nepal. Latest reported address is 165 
Eng Kong Garden, Singapore 21, 
Singapore. 

MEZAKS-SWENSON 

Nancy L. Swenson '65 to Walter V. 
Mezaks. August 4, 1973, Immanuel 
Lutheran Church, New York City. 
Janet Swenson Updegrove '57 was 
matron of honor and Marybeth 
Russell '68 was an attendant. Nancy is 
an account executive with a public 
relations agency. Mr. Mezaks is an in- 
dependent member of the New York 
Stock Exchange. 440 East 62nd 



WINTER 1974 



St., Apt. 10-E, New York, N.Y. 
10021. 

HORN-MONINGHOFF 

Eileen M. Moninghoff 70 to Eric 
L. Horn '68, August 11, 1973, Church 
of Our Lady of Victories, Baptistown. 
N.J. Dr. Ralph Shockey '36, hc'72 
was one of the officiants. Members of 
the wedding party included John C. 
Horn Jr. '64 and Linda Rolston 70. A 
number of S.U. alumni attended the 
wedding, including President and Mrs. 
Weber. Eileen is assistant operations 
officer, Santa Monica Bank, Pacific 
Palisades. Eric, son of Dr. and Mrs. 
John C. Horn hc'65, is assistant to the 
president of Watt Industries, Santa 
Monica. 1409 Midvale Ave., Los 

Angeles. Calif. 90024. 

MILLER-STONER 

Kathleen Jo Stoner x'76 to Robert 
C. Miller 73, August 18. 1973, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church, Telford, Pa. 
John Hall 71 was an usher. Kathleen 
is attending Point Park Col- 
lege. 401 W. Neville St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213. 

POLAKIEWICZ-HAAS 

Betsy J. Haas 73 to Thaddeus S. 
Polakiewicz, August 18, 1973, Our 
Lady of Mount Virgin Church, Mid- 
dlesex. N.J. Members of the wedding 
party included Nancy Haas Reese '69 
and Kathleen Hummel 73. The 
groom attends the University of Tam- 
pa. 3857 South Lake Dr., Apt. 
158, Tampa, Fla. 33614. 

JOSEPHS-FANKHAUSER 

Jane L. Fankhauser 72 to Steven F. 
Josephs 72, August 25, 1973, Point 
Pleasant (Pa.) Community Baptist 
Church. Hugh Hart 74 was the 
organist and Toni Fetter 72 a soloist. 
Jacqueline Strub 75 performed an in- 
terpretive dance and Beth Huffman 
73 registered the guests. Serving 
among reception assistants were Wen- 
dy Lovgren 72 and Alice Marie Shue 
73. Jane is teaching in Takoma Park, 
Md. Steve is in the U.S. Army at 
Walter Reed Army Institute of 
Research, chemical information and 
handling in the division of medicinal 
chemistry, while studying for his 
master's degree in science teaching at 
American University. 6912 
Willow St.. N.W.. Washington, DC. 
20012. 

STEVENS-LACKO 

Marilyn J. Lacko 73 to Mark L. 
Stevens 71, August 31, 1973, Ormond 
Beach (Fla.) Presbyterian Church. 
Karen Buehler 73 served as maid of 
honor. Mark received the master's 



degree from Villanova University. 
The couple is living in Keystone 
Heights, Fla. 

HAMLIN-JONES 

Darcy A. Jones 72 to Donald C. 
Hamlin 70, September 1, 1973, Em- 
manuel Church. Chestertown, Md. 
Susan Wright 72 served as organist 
and Jan Clare 72 as soloist. Janet 
Haigh 72, Lynn Whittlesey 72, Jef- 
frey Scott 70, and Edmond Dale 70 
were in the wedding party. Darcy is 
with Goodis, Greenfield, Henry, 
Shaiman & Levin, attorneys. Don is a 
programmer with the Girard 
Bank. Apt. B-8, 146 S. Lansdowne 
Ave., Lansdowne. Pa. 19050. 
DUCEMAN-FULTON 

Roberta E. Fulton 73 to Barry W. 
Duceman 71, September 1, 1973, 
Kennett Square Presbyterian Church. 
Barry is a research technician at 
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 
working on the metabolism of 
enzyme-inducing drugs. He is co- 
author of a paper for the Journal of 
Molecular Pharmacology entitled 
"Further Evidence for the Stabiliza- 
tion of Ribosomal Precursor RNA by 
Phenobarbital." 201 W. Cherry 
St., Palmyra, Pa. 17084. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1974 
SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULES 





BASEBALL 


M30 


Dickinson 


A3 


Messiah 


A6 


York 


A10 


Juniata 


A17 


Scranton 


A20 


Delaware Valley 


A25 


Elizabethtown 


A27 


Philadelphia Textile 


Ml 


Western Maryland 


M4 


Albright 


M9 


Kings 


Mil 


Wilkes 


M15 


Bucknell 



TRACK 



H 
A 
A 
H 
H 
H 
A 
H 
A 
A 
H 
A 
H 



A3 


York 


H 


A6 


Bloomsburg State 


H 


A10 


Dickinson 


A 


A20 


Lycoming 


H 


A23 


Juniata 


H 


A25 


Delaware Valley 






& Albright 


Albright 


Ml 


Gettysburg 


H 


M3,4 


MAC Championships 


Dickinson 


M7 


Bucknell 


A 


Mil 


Wagner 


A 



LYLE-HESS 

Mary E. Hess '73 to Robert G. 
Lyle, September 1, 1973, United 
Methodist Church, Matamoras, Pa. 
The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles Lyle of the Susquehanna 
Psychology Department. Apt. 1, 
213 Front St., Catasauqua, Pa. 18032. 
POTOR-HUGHES 

Lynn C. Hughes '73 to George F. 
Potor '74, September 1, 1973. 102 1 /2 
High St., Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 
GERMAN-WHITE 

Catherine E. White and David E. 
German '66, September 15, 1973, 
First Baptist Church, Gaithersburg, 
Md. Mrs. German is a beauty shop 
owner in Wheaton, Md. and Dave is a 
certified public accountant for 
Regardi & Brooks, Washington 
D.C. 19459 Transhire Rd., 
Gaithersburg, Md. 20760. 

SCH ARWATH-WEB E R 

Cheryl E. Weber '71 to John T. 
Scharwath, September 15, 1973, 
Reformed Church of Metuchen, N.J. 
Cheryl teaches in the Long Valley 
Middle School, Chester, N.J., and her 
husband, a graduate of the University 
of Vermont, is with Automatic Data 
Processing Inc., Clifton, N.J. 





GOLF 






Al 


Delaware Valley & Upsala 


Del. 


Val. 


A4 


Bloomsburg State 




H 


A9 


F & M 




A 


All 


Lycoming & Juniata 


Juniata 


A16 


Dickinson 




H 


A18 


Western Maryland 




A 


A23 


Bucknell 




H 


A29 


MAC Tournament 


Del. 


Val. 


M2 


Elizabethtown 




A 


M6 


Upsala, Wilkes & Scranton 




H 


M9 


Gettysburg 




H 




WOMEN'S TENNIS 






A10 


Millersville State 




H 


M2 


Elizabethtown 




A 


M8 


Shippensburg State 

MEN'S TENNIS 




H 


M30 


Dickinson 




A 


A3 


Elizabethtown 




A 


A6 


Upsala 




H 


All 


Juniata 




H 


A17 


Lycoming 




H 


A20 


Wilkes 




H 


A25 


Scranton 




A 


A27 


Albright 




A 


Ml 


Delaware Valley 




A 


M3,4 


MAC Muhlenberg 


M7 


Bloomsburg State 




H 


M9 


Kings 




H 


M14 


Bucknell 




A 



They live in Dover, N.J. 
RYAN-MUIR 

Margaret P. Muir '73 to Steven C. 
Ryan 73, October 6, 1973, Church of 
the Good Shepherd, Midland Park, 
N.J. Rebecca Young Dagle '73 was 
matron of honor and Richard Hall '73 
was best man. 150 Tryon Ave., 
Apt. A-6, Englewood, N.J. 07631. 
LEWIS-UCKERT 

Nancy S. Uckert '73 to Brian E. 
Lewis '72, October 13, 1973, Brian is 
pursuing graduate study at Kutztown 
State College. 161 Douglass St., 

Reading, Pa. 19601. 

KLING-STUMP 

Judy E. Stump '73 to Edmund P. 
Kling III '72, October 20, 1973. Ed is 
an accounting analyst, American 
Chain & Cable Co., York, Pa. 47 
East Main St., Mountville, Pa. 17544. 
SCHREYER-BENAMATI 

Mary Benamati to Philip H. 
Schreyer Jr. '74, November 24, 1973, 
St. Louis Roman Catholic Church, 
Lucern Mines, Pa. The bride is a '72 
graduate of Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and is teaching home 
economics in the Apollo (Pa.) Ridge 
school district. Phil completed his 
B.A. requirements in the fall and is 
pursuing graduate study at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania in 
counselor education-guidance. 38-A 
N. 12th St., Indiana, Pa. 15701. 



Born Crusaders 



To James T. '64 and Dena Sebas- 
tian Parks '66, their second child, a 
son, Christopher James, September 3, 
1971. 410 Davis St., Elkins, W. 
Va. 26241. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. Ted F. 
Oswald '66, their first child, a son, 
Thaddeus, October 18, 1971. Box 
3036, 170 W. Tenth St., Ashtabula, 
Ohio 44004. 

To Roland D. and Penney Graham 
Gustafson '67, their first child, a son, 
Kurt Graham, November 10, 1972. 
Father is a real estate analyst for 
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 
Co., Boston. 121 Chapel St., Pem- 

broke, Mass. 02359. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Mattis 
'69, a son. Christopher James, 
November 13, 1972. Jeff is working 
toward his Ph.D. in biological 
chemistry at Purdue University. He 



presented a paper at the Chicago 
meeting of the American Chemical 
Society and had another published in 
Biochemistry. 12. 2239 (1973). 483 
Littleton St., West Lafayette, Ind. 
47906. 

To Richard L. and Dianne Stauffer 
Gimbi "64. a daughter, Christa Louise, 
January 5, 1973. Christa has a 
brother, Craig, age 6. R.D. 2, Box 
20-B. Weatherly, Pa. 18255. 

To Gordon R. and Linda Scharff 
Smith '64. a daughter, Debra Ann, 
through adoption, January 24, 1973. 
Debbie was born October 15, 
1969. 17640 S.W. 84 Court, 
Miami. Fla. 33157. 

To the Rev. James R. '64 and 
Barbara Miles Bramer x'66, their se- 
cond child, a son. Mark Andrew, 
February 5. 1973. Jim is pastor of the 
East Kishacoquillas Lutheran 
Parish. Box 546, 146 Maclay St, 
Milroy, Pa. 17063. 

To Kurt '69 and Joanne Goglia 
Reinhart '68, their first child, a son, 
Todd Robert, March 8, 1973. Kurt is 
a medical technician at Union 
Hospital. Elkton. Md. 820 Brad- 
ford Lane, Newark. Del. 19711. 

To William P. and Elizabeth 
Vomer Borger '71, a daughter, Jen- 
nifer Lynn, April 27, 1973. Father is 
an employment consultant for J-Rand 
Personnel Inc., Bethlehem, and Betty 
is a programmer for Olivetti- 
Underwood Corp., Allentown. 725 
Dodson St., Bethlehem. Pa. 18015. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Leese 
'68, a daughter, Alison Robin, May 
23, 1973. Jeff is a process chemist in 
production troubleshooting for Allied 
Chemical Corp., Marcus Hook, 
Pa. 900 Cedartree Lane, Apt. 8, 
Claymont, Del. 19703. 

To Clair V. and Sandra Troutman 
Troutman '64, their second child, a 
daughter. Staci Lorraine, June 28, 
1973. Box 231-A, R.D.. Herndon, 
Pa. 17830. 

To F. Warren '66 and Linda Ale.x- 
anderson Ebert '66, their first child, a 
daughter, Laurie Lynn, July 3, 
1973. 26 Norwood Ter., Millburn, 
N.J. 07041. 

To Dr. George A. '64 and Carol 
Cox Kirchner x'65. their second child, 
a son. Grant Arlington. July 9, 
1973. 469 Manor Dr., Allentown, 
Pa. 18103. 

To Norman A. '62 and Annette 
Campbell Crickenberger '64, their 
fourth child and second daughter, 
Lynda Sue. August 1, 1973. Norm is 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



vice president and auditor of the 
Oystermen's Bank & Trust Co., 
Sayville. 263 Candee Ave., 
Sayville, N.Y. 11782. 

To Jerry E. '65 and Maureen 
Curley Egger '64, their second child, 
a son, Craig Alan, August 4, 1973. 
Jerry is a senior systems analyst with 
Caterpillar Tractor Co., York. The 
Eggers have purchased a 22-acre 
farm, R.D. 4, Box 107, Dover, Pa. 
17315. 

To Dale E. and Shirley Clark Lynn 
'71, their first child, a daughter, 
Diane Elizabeth, August 16, 1973. 
Mr. Lynn is with Lawn and Golf, 
Inc., Phoenixville. 136 Buchanan 
St., Phoenixville, Pa. 19460. 

To William R. '65 and Sandra 
Crowl Walker '67, a son, Scott 
William, August 28. 1973. 411 
Carpenter La., Hatfield, Pa. 19440. 

To Drs. David J. '65 and Blairanne 
Hoover Revak '65. their third child, a 
daughter, Shelley, September 11, 
1973. R.D. 3, Wonderview, 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 17815. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Had- 
field '68, their second child, a 
daughter, Amy Lynn, September 22, 
1973. Bob is an architectural 
representative for Armstrong Cork 
Co. 10305 Gayton Rd., Rich- 
mond, Va. 23233. 

To Rudolph S. Jr. '69 and Marcia 
Spongier Sharpe '69, a daughter, Amy 
Rebecca, September 23, 1973. 137 
Apple La., Hershey, Pa. 17033. 

To James T. and Janice Hiddemen 
McDeavitt x'59, their third child, a 
daughter, Jessica Lee, October 1, 
1973. 833 Clovelly Rd., Winston- 
Salem, N.C. 27106. 

To James K. '70 and Roberta 
Schroeder Hill '71, their first child, a 
daughter, Heather Michelle, October 
2. 1973. Jim is with the Orlando- 
Miami division of Jack Eckerd 
Corp. 2500 Howell Branch Rd„ 
Apt. 336. Winter Park, Fla. 32789. 

To James L. II '68 and Karen 
Em/ey Lubrecht '70, a son, Clint Dar- 
ryl, October 2, 1973. Jim is an ad- 
ministrative assistant for the Bureau 
of State Parks. 1142 Loop Dr., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17112. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Van 
Nuys III x'68, a daughter, Leah 
Danielle, October 12. 1973. Walt is 
associated with Penn-Selin Con- 
struction Co., Selinsgrove. 936 
Reagan St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. 
Swavely '68, their second child, a 



deaths 



Irene Freeman Shaffer, April 30, 
1973, Johnstown, Pa. She was the 
wife of Harry P. Shaffer '29. 

Joseph P. Driscoll '51. Old Lyme, 
Conn., July 29, 1973. An English 
teacher and school newspaper adviser 
at New London H.S., he had done 



daughter, Lisa Dawn, October 14, 
1973. Fred is a research and develop- 
ment chemist for Firestone Plastics 
Co., Pottstown. 625 N. Reading 
Ave., Box 123, New Berlinville, Pa. 
19545. 

To Attorney Edward and Patricia 
Norris Slaughter '67, their first child, 
a daughter, Melissa Norris, August 
23, 1973. 106 Fresh Ponds Rd„ 

East Brunswick, N.J. 08816. 

To Dr. William M. and Mary Ann 
Valunas Weader x'62, twin daughters, 
Lori Ann and Tami Sue, October 20, 
1973. The Weaders have three other 
children. 107 Susquehanna Ave., 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Walter A. '64 and Phyllis 
Garver Speidell '65, a son, Paul Allen, 
October 27, 1973. Mother has her 
M.A. in general professional educa- 
tion and Father his M.B.A. in 
marketing, both from Seton Hall 
University. Walt has been promoted 
to senior business analyst for Dia- 
mond Shamrock Chemical Co., head- 
quartered in Cleveland. 28101 
Knickerbocher Ave., Bay Village, 
Ohio 44140. 

To James G. and Harriet Burger 
Griffith '70. their first child, a son, 
Nikolas John-Paul, November 3, 
1973. 572 Wilson Bridge Dr., Apt. 
D-2, Oxon Hill, Md. 20021. 

To Samuel R. x'66 and Mary Lee 
Andrews '66. their third child, a 
daughter, Nancy Diane, November 5, 
1973. Christopher Jon was born 
February 2, 1968 and Jennifer Lee, 
February 18, 1971. Sarn is a sales ad- 
ministrator with Motor Freight Ex- 
press. 459 Ludlow Ave., York, Pa. 
17403. 

To Paul J. and Janice Paul 
Arcidiacono x'58, their first child, a 
daughter, Zoe Vanessa, November 9, 
1973. 25 Indian Rd. 2-B, New 
York, N.Y. 10034. 



special work in the M.A.T. program 
at Yale. He was a U.S. Army Air 
Force veteran of European service in 
World War II. 

Rhoda Weirich Awkerman x'18, 
Mount Union, Pa., August 13, 1973. 

Dr. George B. Backer '54, Forty 
Fort, Pa., August 17. 1973. Physician 
and surgeon, graduate of Hahnemann 
Medical College, he also studied at 
the University of Pennsylvania under 
a fellowship from the Arthritis and 
Rheumatology Foundation. A former 
U.S. Public Health medical officer 
and private practitioner, at the time 
of his death he was director of 
rheumatology at Wilkes-Barre 
General Hospital and Allied Services 
of Scranton, and an associate at 
Penn's Arthritis Clinic. His widow is 
the former Claire Haggerty '54. 

Sara Hassinger Fague '26, Naples, 
Fla., September 8, 1973, from injuries 
received in an automobile accident in 
Yellowstone National Park. She 
taught school prior to her marriage to 
the Rev. Dr. Harlan D. Fague '25. 
She was active in the work of Em- 
manuel Lutheran Church, Naples, and 
Lutheran Church Women of the 
Florida Synod. Other S.U. survivors 
include daughters Marianne Fague 
Lalljee '51 and Sara Jane Fague 
Aucker x'56, and brother Aaron S. 
Hassinger '17. 

Mary Edna App '08, Selinsgrove 
Pa., September 14, 1973. She retired 
in 1952 after 38 years as a teacher in 
the Snyder County schools. Her 
father, the late D. Norman App '72, 
attended Missionary Institute and 
served on the Susquehanna Board of 
Directors until his death. Grandfather 
John App, by donating land and 
money, played an important part in 
the establishment of the University at 
Selinsgrove. Two of her brothers were 
the late Isaac D. App '05 and Robert 
L. App '08. 

Richard C. Cox h'67, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., September 14, 1973. He was a 
licensed realtor, a lecturer in business 
administration at Susquehanna for 10 
years, an active leader in community 
affairs, and an enthusiastic booster of 
Crusader sports. 

Robert A. Billman, Herndon, Pa., 
October 2, 1973. He was a brother of 
music professor Fred Billman '36 and 
the late J. Donald Billman '40, and 
father of Judith K. Billman '69. 

Miller R. Gerhardt '30, Johnstown, 
Pa., October 12, 1973. He had been 
with Bethlehem Steel Co. He main- 



WINTER 1974 



25 



tained a strong interest in Sus- 
quehanna and among his con- 
tributions were many books by Oscar 
Belles, a relative on the Gerhardt side 
of the family. 

Catherine Herrold Smozinsky x'26, 
Lewisburg, Pa., October 18, 1973. She 
taught in Monroe Township, Hum- 
mels Wharf, Pa., and Kelly Township 
schools, and was a member of Christ's 
Lutheran Church. Funeral arrange- 
ments were in charge of John H. 
Shaw III x'65. 

Dr. John S. Bangson '15, Phoenix, 
Ariz., October 20, 1973. He attended 
the Susquehanna Academy and earn- 
ed both B.S. and M.A. degrees from 
the University, then went on to the 
Ph.D. in genetics from Penn State. A 
veteran of World War I, he had a 
distinguished career as head of the 
biology department at Berea College 
for 31 years, later taught at Chapman 
College and, after World War II was 
for a time with the Oak Ridge In- 
stitute of Nuclear Studies doing 
research in the effects of radiation on 
living organisms. He was a past presi- 
dent of the Kentucky Academy of 
Science. 

Clyde M. Troutman x'26, Liver- 
pool, Pa., October 20. 1973. He re- 
ceived his B.S. from Millersville State 
College, was principal of the Liver- 
pool schools and mayor of Liverpool, 
and was an active leader in Boy 



Scouts and the Lutheran Church of 
the Good Shepherd. 

Miss Susie Winey x'14, Middleburg, 
Pa., October 22, 1973. She was a 
teacher for 48 years, and a leader in 
the First United Church of Christ and 
the Eastern Star. 

Laura Sclwch Horton '20, Devon, 
Pa., October 27. 1973. She was the 
wife of Dr. James B. Horton '20 and 
daughter of the late Ira C. MI'67 and 
Laura Richier Schoch MI'73. Two 
sisters survive: Christine Schoch 
Cassler '19 and Dorotliy Schoch 
Rearlck Ac' 14, wife of Dr. R. B. 
Reurick '21. Three sisters and four 
brothers who also were Sus- 
quehannans preceded her in death. 

Charles C. Eberly '65, Selinsgrove. 
Pa., October 28, 1973, in a jeep-train 
collision. His career included service 
with the Devereux Schools in Devon, 
Pa., U.S. Army, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and sales for eastern 
Pennsylvania with Cheesbrough 
Ponds. He was a member of Temple 
Lutheran Church. Havertown, Pa. 
The Rev. Celo V. Leitzel '45 con- 
ducted the funeral services. 

Sara Haines Zimmerman '31, 
Aaronsburg, Pa., October 31. 1973. 
She was a retired language arts 
teacher in the Penns Valley area 
schools, an active member of St. 
John's Lutheran Church and the 
Eastern Star. Among her survivors are 



daughter Nancy '59, wife of the Rev. 
J. Allen Roshon '57; a son, the Rev. 
P. Philip Zimmerman Jr. '61, married 
to the former Jocelyn Swope '61, and 
a brother, Paul M. Haines '31. 

Milo A. Hassinger AcT2 x'16, Mid- 
dleburg, Pa., November 3, 1973. He 
earned the bachelor's degree from 
Penn State and was an electrical 
engineer for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad for 38 years. Son Harold is 
the husband of the former Jeanne At- 
tinger x'5 1 . 

Percy Hon, Lansdowne, Pa., 
November 5, 1973. He was the hus- 
band of the former Helen Culp '31. 

Miss Aberdeen Phillips '15, Selins- 
grove, Pa., November 11, 1973. A 
former teacher and retired insurance 
broker, she also was for 14 years, 
with her late sister Mary Phillips TO, 
co-publisher-editor of the old Snyder 
County Tribune. Active in many local 
organizations, she helped to found the 
Selinsgrove Community Center and 
was a member of Sharon Lutheran 
Church and the S.U. Women's Aux- 
iliary. Aberdeen was the last surviv- 
ing offspring of a Welsh tailor and his 
wife who settled in Selinsgrove in 
1888 and sent all 12 of their children 
to Susquehanna. In all, including 
those acquired by marriage, 39 mem- 
bers of the family attended the Uni- 
versity during the past three genera- 
tions. 




May 3, 4, 5, 
May 26 
October 5 
October 19 



Susquehanna dates 

to remember this year . . . 

ALUMNI WEEKEND 

BACCALAUREATE AND COMMENCEMENT 

HOMECOMING 

PARENTS DAY 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
STANDING COMMITTEES 1973-74 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY FUND 

Douglas E. Arthur '49, Chairman, 4696 North Galen Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17110 

Charles E. Chaffee '27 Albert P. Molinaro Jr. '50 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23 Frank A. Procopio '61 

Raymond P. Garman '30 Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42 

Ralph C. Geigle '35 Erie I. Shobert II '35 

James J. Gormley '55 Homer W. Wieder Jr. 

ALUMNI WEEKEND 

Louis F. Santangelo '50, Chairman. Ill Cocoa Ave., Hershey, Pa. 17033 
George H. Bantley '41, Vice Chairman, 4998 Longview Dr., Murrysville, Pa. 15668 
Simon B. Rhoads '30 Dorothy Turner '36 

M. Jane Schnure '39 Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68 

Jack P. Shipe '40 

Reunion Chairmen 

Emeriti: Raymond L. Lubold, 515 North Ninth St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

1964: Robert G. Gundaker, 6 Dartmouth Rd., Cranford, N.J. 07016 

1959: 

1954: Walter R. Henry, 3 Stanyon Rd., York, Pa. 17403 

1949: James B. Peters, Curtis Ave., R.D. 3, Kutztown, Pa. 19530 

1944: The Rev. Henry F. Hopkins, United Methodist Church, Huntingdon, Pa. 16652 

1939: W. Frank Laudenslayer, 215 N. Sixth St.. Box 311, Reading, Pa. 19603 

1934: Daniel T. McKelvey Jr., 572 N. Vine St., Hazleton, Pa. 18201 

1929: William O. Roberts, 218 Rhoads Ave.. Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

1924: Alvin W. Carpenter, 101 N. Eleventh St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801 

AWARDS 
Donald E. Wissinger '50, Chairman, 3 Oak St., Sylvan Hills, Hollidaysburg, Pa. 16648 
Xavier Abbott '35 S. John Price '42 

Peter M. Nunn '57 Chester G. Rowe '52 

Jane Southwick Mathias '49 

NOMINATIONS 

Gerald C. Herbster '58, Chairman, 122 N. Maple Ave., Basking Ridge, N.J. 07920 
Signe S. Gates '71 Frank G. Smith '55 

Linda Nansteel Lovell '71 Donald F. Wohlsen '50 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

William C. Davenport '53, Chairman, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Dorothy M. Anderson '62 Alan C. Lovell '70 

Gwen L. Barclay '75 Edward K. McCormick 

Samuel D. Clapper '68 Carol Fexa Roush '71 

Pamela Gehron '74 Ernest L. Tyler '72 

Debra P. Horner '74 J. Richard Walker '74 

Robert C. Kessler '74 

CLUB ACTIVITIES 

Lester C. Heilman '52, Chairman, 244 Green Lane Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Janis Adams John '59, Vice Chairman, 1396 Bittersweet La., King Meadow Farms, West 
Chester, Pa. 19380 



Robert N. Troutman '26 California 
Carolyn L. Tritt '68, Chambersburg-Hagerstown 
W. Alfred Streamer '26, Centre-Union 
William C. Davenport '53, Harrisburg 
John A. Topper '65, Johnstown 
Richard E. McCarty '55, Lancaster 
Gilbert C. Askew '61, Lehigh Valley 
Harry B. Thatcher '41, Lewistown 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, Mt. Carmel-Shamokin 
Barry I. x'64 and Miriam Brown 
Markowitz '63, North Jersey 



Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51, Northeastern 

Pennsylvania 
Kenneth R. Fish '63, Philadelphia 
Thomas G. P. Roberts '68, Pittsburgh 
Douglas E. Spotts '63, South Jersey 
Arthur F. Bowen '65, Susquehanna Valley 
Peter M. Nunn '57, Washington, D.C. 
Janet Leitzel Fairchild '32, Westchester 

County -Southern Connecticut 
Donald S. King '66, Williamsport 
Jerry E. Egger '65, York-Hanover 



WINTER 1974 



27 




Retiring senior Co-captains Eickhoff and 

Atkinson of the impressive 1973 SU soccer team. 

The Potter-coached Crusader kickers were seeded 

first in the ECAC Southern Regional tourney. 



SU Sports 



by RON BERKHEIMER 



Susquehanna h\d another disappointing year in football, 
but the soccer team made its first appearance in a post- 
season tournament and the cross country team rebounded 
strongly from its poor record in 1972. Moreover, the 
outlook for both the basketball and wrestling teams was 
good as the winter season got underway. 

Defense carried the soccer team to a 6-2-4 regular- 
season record and a berth in the ECAC (Eastern College 
Athletic Conference) Southern Regional tournament. In 
fact, the Crusaders were seeded first in a four-team field 
rounded out by Franklin & Marshall. Kutztown State and 
Wilkes. 

However, the defense collapsed in the tournament itself 
as Susquehanna lost to Wilkes 5-3 in the opening round. F & 
M, which hosted the tournament, won it by beating 
Kutztown 1-0 and Wilkes 2-1. There was no consolation 
game. 

Susquehanna, a young team, looked inept in the season 
opener, a 7-0 loss to Elizabethtown. But the Crusaders set- 
tled down and posted 6 wins and 4 ties in their next 10 
games. During the streak, they posted five shutouts and gave 
up a total of only six goals. Individual defensive standouts 
were fullbacks Rich Eickhoff (Morrisville. Pa.). Bill 
Dorman (Rutherford. N.J.) and Jim Schrader (Livingston, 
N.J.) and goalie Chris Blackmon (New Britain, Pa.). 

Included in the streak were a scoreless tie with a Get- 
tysburg team which had previously tied Elizabethtown and a 




This is Ron Berkheimer's 34th and last SU 
Sports column in Susquehanna Alumnus. Ron 
will be missed at Susquehanna — he came in 
September of 1962 and took over as director of 
public information a year later. On January 
I, 1974 he assumed a similar position at 
Juniata College. Besides issuing literally 
thousands of news releases during his years in 
Selinsgrove, Ron wrote 15 by-lined feature 
stories for this magazine and was acting editor 
in 1967-68. He came to know many Susquehanna 
alumni intimately and we know that they as well 
as we wish him well in his new association 
with our sister college in Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. And we thank him for his many 
contributions to our program here. — EDITOR 



28 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



1-0 victory over Bucknell. In retrospect, the Bucknell win 
must be considered the highlight of the season. The 
Crusaders had never beaten Bucknell before in soccer and 
when they did it this year they picked on one of the best 
teams the Bisons ever had. Bucknell went on to post a 
regular-season record of 9-2-1 while winning its section of 
the Middle Atlantic Conference University Division. 

Susquehanna also whipped Wilkes 3-1 in a regularly 
scheduled game and played well enough, offensively, to beat 
the Colonels in the tournament. In the tournament loss, the 
Crusaders led Wilkes in shots, 10-7, and in corner kicks, 8-2. 

The Crusaders were seldom impressive on offense, but 
the goals and assists were scattered among a dozen players 
and opponents weren't able to key on anyone. Leading 
scorers were sophomore Kurt Kohler (Grosse Pointe 
Woods, Mich.), four goals and four assists; freshman Rob 
Hazel (Chesapeake City, Md. ), six goals and one assist, and 
Dave Orris (Middleburg. Pa.), another freshman, five goals 
and two assists. 

Susquehanna loses only three players through gradua- 
tion — fullbacks Eickhoff and Bob Stamm (Fanwood, N.J.) 



Consistent cross country winner Yoder 

(at left) and freshman football carrier Lawlor, who 

was named 197 3' s Most Valuable Player. 



and lineman Bill Atkinson (Chatham, N.J.). Eickhoff and 
Atkinson were the co-captains. 

The cross country team, which stumbled to a 1-11 
record in 1972, assured itself of better things this season by 
beating Haverford and Lebanon Valley in the first meet. 
Coached by Bruce Wagenseller, head of the Physcial Educa- 
tion Department and an ardent jogger himself, the team 
posted an 8-5 record, giving Susquehanna its eighth winning 
season in cross country during the past 10 years. Sophomore 
Jeff Yoder of Mt. Carmel, Pa. finished first for the 
Crusaders in most meets and the remainder of the team was 
composed mainly of freshmen. 

* * * 

Eleven freshmen lettered in football during a 
frustrating 2-7 season. The loss of numerous upperclassmen 
who dropped out of school or decided not to come out for 
football forced head coach Jim Hazlett to rely heavily on 
frosh. Hazlett noted that the 50 players who participated in 
a winter workout program last year had dwindled to 28 at 
the start of pre-season practice. The remaining 38 candidates 
who reported for the opening drills were first-year men. 

Tailback Tim Lawlor (Shillington, Pa.) established a 
new Susquehanna rushing record for freshmen with 669 




WINTER 1974 



29 



yards and fullback Jim Gamut (Johnstown, Pa.), another 
yearling, contributed an additional 333 yards. Sophomore 
Jeff Steltz (Wyomissing, Pa.), who took the starting assign- 
ment at split end away from two seniors, was the leading 
receiver with 26 catches for 340 yards. 

Another standout was placekicker and defensive tackle 
Chuck Smeltz of Sunbury, who gained national recognition 
when his 53rd extra point without a miss broke an NCAA 
College Division record. Smeltz, who hasn't missed a PAT 
in his three years at Susquehanna, had stretched his string to 
58 at the close of the season. In addition, he set what is 
thought to be a new S.U. record for field goals in one 
season with 10 and tied the record for the longest with a 47- 
yarder. His 10 three-pointers came in only 14 attempts. 

The most disappointing aspect of the season was the 
failure of the defensive unit to perform consistently or to 
hold leads the Crusaders had in several games they lost. 
However, an inexperienced offensive line, considered the 
team's biggest weakness as the season opened, showed steady 
improvement, providing adequate blocking for the running 
backs and some excellent pass protection for the 
quarterbacks in the last few games. 



Susquehanna has had only one winning season in 
basketball during the past decade, but the Crusaders were 
expecting bigger and better things this winter. Coach Barry 



Keadle's rebuilding program started paying off in the latter 
part of the 1972-73 season. His young team, which had lost 
nine of its first 12 games, suddenly jelled and won seven of 
the remaining 11. Included in the comeback were victories 
on the road over three opponents who had beaten the 
Crusaders earlier at home. 

With almost everyone returning and another good 
group of freshmen providing additional depth, the outlook 
for this winter was quite promising. High-scoring guard Jim 
Baglin (Plainfield, N.J.), a senior, headed the list of return- 
ing lettermen. Baglin, who transferred to Susquehanna after 
completing the two-year program at Union College in New 
Jersey, averaged 18.1 points per game last winter and also 
was high in assists with 74. 

Other returning starters were center Dave Long 
(Doylestown, Pa.), who averaged 11.5 points per game last 
year as a freshman; forward-guard Ralph Wolckenhauer 
(River Vale, N.J.), 10.5 points and 8.4 rebounds per game; 
playmaker Joe Prekopa (McAdoo. Pa.), and forward Dun- 
can Blair (Brooklyn. N.Y.). 



The Crusaders are more accustomed to winning in 
wrestling. S.U. hasn't had a losing season in this sport since 
it was added to the athletic program in 1966-67. Facing a 
stronger schedule last winter in a rebuilding campaign, the 
Crusaders won 7 and lost 5. They have more experience this 
year and hope to improve on that record. 













FALL 1973-74 










su 




Opp. 








SU 




Opp. 




SOCCER 





















Elizabethtown 




7 














5 


Wagner 







SU 




Opp. 




CROSS COUNTRY 




2 


Western Maryland 




2 




20 


Haverford 


44 


5 



Upsala 
Gettysburg 




1 





FOOTBALL 




20 
49 


Lebanon Valley 
Bucknell 


34 
15 


1 


Scranton 




1 


24 


Grove City 


13 


21 


York 


40 


1 


Lycoming 







13 


Wilkes 


20 


32 


Lock Haven State 


24 


1 


St. Bonaventure 




1 


17 


Westminster 


31 


25 


Elizabethtown 


34 


1 


Bucknell 







11 


Western Maryland 


14 


43 


Juniata 


17 


3 


Lebanon Valley 







3 


Juniata 


14 


19 


Dickinson 


44 


3 


Wilkes 




1 


10 


Upsala 


8 


18 


Wilkes 


45 


1 


Dickinson 




2 


13 


Lycoming 


18 


37 


Delaware Valley 


20 


3 


Wilkes 




5 


14 


Delaware Valley 


25 


45 


Gettysburg 


18 




Won 6 Lost 3 Tied 


4 




10 


Wagner 


31 


19 


Scranton 


39 












Won 2 Lost 7 Tied 





21 


Albright 


38 




WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY 
































Won 8 Lost 5 Tied 








Lock Haven State 




8 

















Bucknell 




3 




JV FOOTBALL 













Juniata 






















Messiah 




3 


16 


Lycoming 


14 








1 


Bloomsburg State 




2 


34 


Lock Haven State 


13 




JV SOCCER 







Shippensburg State 




4 


16 


Stevens Trade 


13 











Lebanon Valley 




2 


7 


Juniata 


13 


1 


Bucknell 


2 


1 


Dickinson 




2 


7 


Bucknell 


33 


3 


Dickinson 


1 




Won Lost 7 Tied 


1 






Won 3 Lost 2 Tied 







Won 1 Lost 1 Tied 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

(FOR MEMBERS & THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILIES) 
PRESENTS 



ROME 



« 



MAY 10-18,1974 

8 Days -7 Nights 



$ 



329 



( + 13% Tax & Service) 

Per person-Double occupancy 

Single Supplement - $60.00 




YOUR TRIP INCLUDES: 

* ROUND TRIP JET TO ROME (MEALS & BEV- 

ERAGES SERVED ALOFT) PHILADELPHIA 
EVENING DEPARTURE ! 

* BEAUTI FUL ACCOMMODATIONS AT THE 

RITZ-SPORTING HOTELS ! 

* CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST DAILY (TAX 

&TIP INCLUDED) ! 

* GOURMET DINNER EACH EVENING (TAX 

& TIP INCLUDED) ! 

* TOUR OF ANCIENT ROME ! 

*TOUR OF RELIGIOUS SITES OF ROME ! 

* EXCITING LOW-COST OPTIONAL TOURS 
AVAILABLE ! 

* ALL GRATUITIES for BELLMEN, 

CHAMBERMAIDS & DOORMEN ! 

* ALL ROUND TRIP TRANSFERS & LUGGAGE 

HANDLING from AIRPORT to the HOTEL ! 

* EXPERIENCED ESCORT & HOTEL 

HOSPITALITY DESK ! 

■ Air transportation - 250 seat Overseas National Airways 
DC-8Jet Cost -$180.00; Land -$191 .77 
Charter Cost - $45,000 



GENERAL INFORMATION: Deposits are accepted on a First-Come, First -Served basis as SPACE IS LIMITED I Final payment is due 60 days prior to departure. 

New bookings are accepted any time prior to departure providing space is available. Reservations may not be considered confirmed until deposits are accepted 

by Arthurs Travel Center. Information will be sent to you four to six weeks after your deposit is received. Cancellation without penalty will be permitted if 

written request is received 60 days before departure. Cancellation after 60 days will be subject to an administrative charge of $25.00 per person and there will 

also be a charge for the pro rata air fare unless replacement is made from a waiting list, however, the availability of such replacement is not guaranteed. 

Refunds resulting from cancellations will take 8 to 10 weeks to process. 

■Applicable government regulations require that air/land costs are quoted and that the air cost is subject to revision based on the actual number of participants; 

however, only the complete air/land package(s) described in this brochure is available. Price subject to change for currency fluctuation, any taxes imposed since 

the price of this trip has been set and enactment of applicable government regulations. RESPONSIBILITY: ARTHURS TRAVEL CENTER, INC. 'and/or 

its associated agents act as agent only for all services furnished herein and EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL RESPONSIBILITY OR LIABILITY OF ANY 

NATURE WHATSOEVER FOR LOSS, DAMAGE OR INJUR Y TO PROPERTY OR TO PERSON DUE TO ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER occurring during 

the tour or tours described herein and for loss of trip time resulting from airline delays. 

All tickets, coupons and orders are issued subject to the foregoing and to any and all terms and conditions under which the means of transportation 

and /or other services provided thereby are offered and/or supplied by the owners, contractors or public carriers for whom ARTHURS TRAVEL CENTER 

acts solely as agent. ARTHURS TRA VE L CENTER reserves the right in its discretion to change any part of the itinerary or the air carrier or the aircraft utilized 

without notice and for any reason. *Prices quoted are as of January 1 , 1973 and do not reflect the dollar devaluation of February, 1973 or any additional 

devaluation subsequent to February, 1973. Since the various exchange rates are presently in a state of flux, the applicable surcharge cannot be computed at this 

time. Several months prior to departure, based on the exchange rates then prevailing, you will be invoiced for this surcharge, if any. 

* and Susquehanna Univ. Alumni Assoc. 

For further information, contact and mail deposits to: Buss Carr, Director Alumni Relations, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
PHONE: (717) 374-2345 

NOTE: To ensure that you are enrolled on the trip of your choice, make certain that you use this coupon ! ! ! 

RESERVATION COUPON 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: ROME May 10-18, 1974 
Enclosed find deposit in the amount of $ ($75.00 per person) for person(s). Please enroll us(me). 



NAME(S) 
CITY 



ADDRESS 



STATE 



ZIP 



BUSINESS PHONE 



HOME PHONE 



ROOMING WITH 



Child(ren) aged 14 years or under enrolled on trip, please list age(s) 



Please check if Single Supplement is desired. ( ) Please make checks payable to: Susquehanna Univ. Alumni Assoc. 

Indicate airplane seating preferred (Not guaranteed) □ Smoking □ Non-Smoking 

NOTE: Information will be sent to you four to six weeks after your deposit is received. 



ATTENTION PARENTS 

If this magazine is addressed to your 
son or daughter who no longer main- 
tains a permanent address at your 
home, please clip off the bottom of 
this page, including the address label, 
and return it with the correct address 
to the Alumni Office at Susquehanna 
University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



■ 



The Susquehanna Rlumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




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POSTMASTER: Pleose notify if undeliveroble. En- 

tered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 Post 

Office as Second Class matter. 



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Susquehanna Alumnus 



SPRING 1974 




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Four Men 

Receive 

Honoraries 





Sandsledt and Bringman 
Hatfield and Bremer 





Four men were conferred with honorary degrees at 
Susquehanna on May 25 while 301 seniors were granted their 
bachelor's degrees. The Commencement exercises closed the 
University's 116th academic year. 

U.S. Senator Mark O. Hatfield of Oregon, who 
delivered the Commencement address, was given the Doctor 
of Public Administration. A graduate of Willamette College 
and Stanford University, he formerly taught political science 
and was dean of students at Willamette. The well-known 
spokesman for peace and conservation served as a state 
legislator, state senator, Secretary of State and Governor of 
Oregon before going to Washington. 

Three prominent clergymen received the Doctor of 
Divinity — the Rev. J. Stephen Bremer, senior pastor of 
Luther Memorial Church, Madison, Wis.; the Rev. Dale S. 
Bringman '48, pastor of Grace Lutheran Church, State 
College, Pa.; and the Rev. Daniel H. Standstedt. director of 
field education for the Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg. 



Dr. Bremer, a product of Wesleyan University and the 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, was chaplain of 
Susquehanna, 1969-73, and previously had been senior 
representative for Great Britain and Ireland of the Lutheran 
World Federation. A leader in the field of liturgies, he 
preached the Baccalaureate sermon on the morning of 
Commencement. 

Dr. Bringman, alumnus of Susquehanna and the Get- 
tysburg seminary, has been pastor in the Penn State Universi- 
ty community since 1957. In the Central Pennsylvania Synod, 
Lutheran Church in America, he has seen service as a 
member of the executive board and several important com- 
mittees, and is a former dean of the Lewistown District. 

Dr. Sandstedt holds degrees from Gustavus Adolphus 
College and Augustana Theological Seminary. A specialist in 
pastoral care and clinical pastoral education, he was director 
of chaplaincy at Augustana Hospital in Chicago for many 
years and is currently adviser on hospital chaplaincy to the 
American Hosptial Association. 



On our cover : Two of the Sheep sisters (Janet 
Klemm and Carlen Schmidt) cavort for the 
photographer with Mr. Grass Hopper 
(Morgan Evans) before a children's theatre 
performance of "Aesop's Falables." All three 
are members of the Class of 1977. A highly 
successful show, we tell you more about it on 
pages 14 and 15. 

It hurts us at least as much as it does you, 
gentle reader, when our magazine comes out 
later than usual. We take seriously our obliga- 
tion to appear every three months. This issue 
has been plagued with a number of problems 
which delayed putting it into final form for 
publishing — such as several postponements 
and then very-late cancellation of the annual 
feature from Editorial Projects for Education, 
the change from hot type to cold type which 
necessitated modifications to some of our 
production procedures, and the chaos these fac- 
tors caused as time slipped by and we found 
ourselves smack in the middle of other 
priorities — like Alumni Weekend and Com- 
mencement. We appreciate your patience and 
trust that things will get back on schedule next 
time around. 

— EDITOR 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



usquehanna University 
Rlumni Rssociation 



George H. Bantley 41. president: William C. Davenport 
'53. Robert Hackenberg '56, vice presidents; Signe S. 
Gates 71, secretary; Chester G Rowe '52. treasurer: 
Douglas E. Arthur 49, Henry J. Kell '39. Edward S. 
Rogers Jr. '42. Samuel D. Ross Jr. '54. representatives on 
the University Board ot Directors: Simon B. Rhoads '30. 
Louis F Santangelo '50. representatives on the University 
Intercollegiate Athletic Committee. 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1975: 
Xavier Abbott '35. Jane Southwlck Mathias '49, Peter M. 
Nunn 57. Sharon Fetterolt Vak '68, John P. Yanuklis '60. 
Term expiring 1976: Samuel D. Clapper '66, James 
Gormley '55. Lester C. Hellman '52. Franklin G. Smith '55. 
Term expiring 1977: Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan '62, 
Elwood M. McAllister '49. Virginia Carlson McKenzle '69, 
Neil R. Smith '63. James W. White '58. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 43 



SPRING 1974 



No. 3 



CONTENTS 

Four Men Receive Honoraries inside front cover 

Remembering How We Were: Alumni Day '74 4 

So You Want To Be A Manager 10 

by Samuel D. Ross '54 

Aesop's Falables 14 

The University and the Alumnus: It Can Be 

A Mutually Beneficial Relationship 16 

by D. Edgar Hutchison '34 

Susquehannans On Parade 18 

"I Do" 23 

Born Crusaders 24 

Deaths 25 

Susquehanna 1974 Football Schedule 26 

Board OKs Gym 27 

SU Sports 28 

by Pete Silvestri 

Crusader Scoreboard 30 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SPRING 1974 





Remembering 

The Way We Were: 

ALUMNI DAY '74 











SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



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Springtime is a time for coming back to campus, and nearly 500 alumni and their guests 
came back this year over the May 3 weekend to see their former classmates, look at old 
photographs and yearbooks, catch up on the state of the University, and honor those 
selected to receive Alumni Awards. The 1974 award winners are pictured above: 
Richard C. Leib, Sunbury insurance man, community leader and Susquehanna Ad- 
visory Council member. Distinguished Citizenship Award; chemistry major Bruce W. 
Downs of North Caldwell, N.J. and history major Barbara P. Dairymple of Rosemont, 
Pa., Senior Man and Woman Most Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna; President 
Gustave W. Weber; Jack P. Shipe '40, retired toy manufacturer of Herndon, Pa., 
Alumni Award for Service; Dr. Ralph C. Geigle '35, superintendent of schools in 
Reading, Pa., Alumni Award for Achievement. The Citizenship Award, an illuminated 
plaque, is given annually to a non-alumnus. The other awards are bronze medals de- 
picting Alma Mater as a Susquehanna Indian woman. Award presentations have been 
a highlight of alumni gatherings since 1956 when the first Achievement honors were 
given to the late Jerry D. Bogar x'99and his son, the late Guy M. Bogar '21. 



SPRING 1974 





MINUTES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEETING 

The Susquehanna University Alumni Association met in the 
Campus Center at Selinsgrove on Saturday. May 4. 1974 for the an- 
nual Alumni Weekend business session in connection with the Alum- 
ni Luncheon. There were 435 in attendance. The meeting was called 
to order by President Harry Butts '48 and the invocation was 
pronounced by the Rev. Dr. Edgar S. Brown, chaplain to the Univer- 
sity. 

Following the luncheon. Buss Carr '52. director of alumni 
relations, introduced May Queen Barbara Dalrymple of Rosemont, 
Pa., members of her court and their elected escorts who assisted Lou 
Santangelo '50 in presenting remembrances to emeriti alumni and 
those celebrating the 50th anniversary of their graduation. Other re- 
union classes recognized were 1929, 1934, 1939, 1944, 1949, 1954, 
and 1964. The class of 1959 had no members present to celebrate 
their reunion. The class of 1974 was received into the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and its vice president, William D. Atkinson of Chatam, 
N.J., presented the class gift of S7000 to be used for a score board in 
the new field house. The gift was accepted by Dr. Weber, president 
of the University, with appropriate remarks. 

The business session opened with a motion by Secretary 
Dorothy Turner '36 to approve the minutes of the last meeting as 
reproduced and distributed. She also announced the results of the 
mail vote. For Alumni Representative to the University Board of 
Directors there was a tie between Samuel D. Ross Jr. '54 and Ray- 
mond G. Hochstuhl '47, so both names will be submitted to the Board 
for action. The five Members-at-large elected to the alumni Ex- 
ecutive Committee for terms expiring in 1977 are: Maria Wer- 
nikowski MacFarlan '62, Elwood M. McAllister '49, Virginia 
Carlson McKen/ie '69. Neil R. Smith '63. James W. White '58. 
President Butts reported a treasury balance of $370.44. Lou Sant- 



angelo. Alumni Day chairman, announced the weekend schedule and 
expressed appreciation to the persons who were instrumental in 
making the festivities a success. Lester Heilman '52, chairman of the 
Club Activities Committee, announced that there were 14 area club 
meetings held this year, including two in Florida. There are several 
outings being planned for this summer and two clubs are in the 
process of reactivating. Doug Arthur '49. chairman of the University 
Fund, reported that our goal of $150,000 has not yet been reached but 
there is every reason to believe it will be by June 30. The telethons 
were expanded to more areas this year and will be further expanded in 
1975. Buss Carr, reporting for the University Relations Committee, 
announced that the class of 1969 will hold its fifth reunion at 
Homecoming and that the Alumni Association will sponsor a party 
for the class of 1974 during graduation week. Harry Butts, reporting 
for the Nominating Committee, presented the slate of nominees to 
office for the coming year: George H. Bantley '41, president: William 
C. Davenport '53 and Robert Hackenberg '56, vice presidents; Signe 
S. Gates '71, secretary: Chester G. Rowe '52. treasurer. There were 
no further nominations from the floor. Nominations were closed and 
the secretary was instructed to cast a single ballot for the entire slate. 

Awards Committee Chairman Donald E. Wissinger '50 then 
made these presentations for 1974: Distinguished Citizenship Award 
to Richard C. Leib of Sunbury; Senior Man and Woman Most 
Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna to Bruce W. Downs, North 
Caldwell, N.J., and Barbara P. Dalrymple of Rosemont, Pa.; 
Achievement Medal to Dr. Ralph C. Geigle '35 of Reading, Pa.. 
Service Medal to Jack P. Shipe '40 of Herndon, Pa. 

The luncheon meeting was adjourned with the singing of the 
Alma Mater 

Respectfully submitted. 
Dorothy Ti RNtR )b. Secretary 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 





The weekend activities commenced Friday afternoon with a golf tournament and in- 
cluded such events as a get-together at the home of Simon '30 and Kathryn Jarrett 
Rhoads x'34, class reunion meetings, a dinner dance, and a Chapel service with the Rev. 
Edwin M. Clapper '34 preaching. At Saturday's Awards Luncheon (above) President 
Weber was presented with the Senior Class gift of $7000 for a scoreboard to be placed in 
the new gym, by Bill Atkinson, vice president of the class. Fifty-year graduates were 
recognized with red roses and framed woodcuts of the Roger M. Blough Learning 
Center (upper right. May Queen Barb Dalrymple with Grace Barnett Bastian '24 and 
her husband Fred). Entertaining at the piano during the luncheon was Rudy Gelnett '37. 
Seated at the head table were Lou Santangelo, Voylet Dietz Carr, Don Wissinger, Mrs. 
Edgar Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Leib, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Geigle, President 
Weber, Harry Butts, Mrs. Jack Shipe and Jack, Mrs. Weber, Chaplain Brown, Flora 
Barnhart Wissinger, Virginia Doss Butts, and Buss Carr. 



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SPRING 1974 



Susquehanna students have traditionally been involved in 
Spring Weekend too, and 1974 was no exception. Friday 
evening saw the coronation of May Queen Barbara Dalrym- 
ple of Rosemont, Pa., the second May Queen to be also 
winner of the Alumni Award (the first was Alyce Zimmer in 
1973). She was escorted by King (a first) Richard DiSanti of 
Cheswick. Pa., a geology major. The May Court (below) con- 
sisted of, front: Sara Hess, Summit, N.J.; Karen Newson, 
Lafayette Hill, Pa.; Jeanne Kauffman. Lewistown, Pa,; 
Queen Barbara; 1 973 Queen Alyce Zimmer; Marilynn Blend, 
Hempstead, N.Y.; Susan Lang, West Caldwell, N.J.; Zona 
Weimer, Millerstown, Pa. Back: Steven Kramm, Belleville, 
Pa.; Patrick Petre, Carlisle, Pa.; James Baglin, Plainfield, 
N.J.; King Richard; Miss Zimmer's escort; Douglas 
Brinkman, Glen Cove, N.Y.; William Atkinson, Chatham, 
N.J. Missing from the photo is Darryl Willis, Long Branch, 
N.J. There were three performances each of "Cyrano de 
Bergerac" in Chapel Auditorium and an Opera Workshop in 
Benjamin Apple Theatre. And on Saturday morning student 
crews competed in the annual Raft Race on the Susquehanna 
River — this year won by Kappa Delta and Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 









SPRING 1974 



by SAMUEL D. ROSS 




So You Want 

To Be 

A Manager 




auxa«;i;a\i:\t 



In looking at your program for this week I see that you have 
already received information on a number of professions. I 
would like to take a little time this evening to discuss with you 
all of these previous ideas under the broad umbrella of 
Management. 

We will look at management in several parts — a broad 
overview of management as it is viewed in business and in- 
dustry, the current outlook for job opportunities through the 
remainder of the '70s, the preparation that is needed to get 
into management, starting salaries — that's kind of impor- 
tant — and promotional opportunities. 

In another year (or two), if you don't go on to graduate 
school, you're going to be looking for a job. For many of you 
this will be the first step in your career path. All right, what 
have you done to prepare yourself and how are you going to 
go about looking? Are you anticipating that an employment 
recruiter will interview you on campus? Will you be looking in 
the classified newspaper ads? Are you going to go to an 
employment agency? Or, might you take a State or Federal 
civil service test for a government position? How do you go 
about writing a resume? How do you present yourself 



favorably to a potential employer? What skills do you have to 
offer? These are some of the things you should be thinking 
about and getting answers to between now and the time you 
graduate. 

Motivation for Management Careers 

According to a research report in the December 1973 
issue of Harvard Business Review by John Miner, research 
professor of management at Georgia State University, fewer 
and fewer among the younger generation exhibit the kinds of 
motivation needed for careers in management as we know it 
today. He predicts major shortages of executive talent in the 
years to come. 

He goes on to say that among students, there has been a 
notable shift away from the types of motivation character- 
izing those who typically seek managerial careers in large cor- 
porations and who succeed in those careers. This implies that 
an increasingly high proportion of individuals who are hired 
for management positions will perform poorly in them unless 
some adjustments are made — either within corporations or in 
the groups of new personnel they hire, or both. 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Samuel D Ross '54 is vice president for administrative 
services of Pennsylvania Blue Shield in Harrisburg. 
This article is the text of an address he delivered at 
a three-half-day Career Information Conference staged 
in April by Susquehanna's Placement Office and attended 
by some 250 undergraduates and advisers. At a time 
when students and younger alumni — as well as others 
— arc once again examining career options with great 
care and interest, Sam's remarks about management seem 
relevant to all. Other alumni who made presentations 
at the conference include: The Rev. Gilbert C. 
Askew '61 of Allentown. Pa.; The Rev. W Stevens 
Shipman '69 of Light Street. Pa.; Harry W. Bulls '48, 
Philadelphia regional manager for the Burroughs Corp.; 
Joseph R. Williard '48. public relations director 
for Nationwide Insurance Co.; Marsha Lehman '74, 
applications analyst for the Eastman Kodak Co. Also 
appearing on the program was Robert C. Goetze, 
executive vice president of Albert F. Goetze Inc. and 
a member of Susquehanna's Board of Directors. Another, 
similar conference is scheduled for October 28. 29. 



Professor Miner arrived at certain attitudes and motives 
that are particularly likely to contribute to success in a given 
managerial position at any level and to rapid promotion up 
the managerial ladder. These attitutes are: 

1. A favorable attitude toward authority — Managers 
are expected to behave in ways that do not provoke 
negative reactions from their superiors. 

2. A desire to compete — Insofar as peers are concerned, 
there must be a strong competitive element built into 
managerial work; a manager must compete for the 
available rewards, both for himself and for his group. 

3. Assertive motivation — The manager must be able to 
take charge, to make decisions, and to take such dis- 
ciplinary action as may be necessary to protect the 
other members of his group. 

4. A desire to exercise power — A manager must exer- 
cise power over his subordinates and direct their 
behavior consistent with organizational objectives. 
He must tell others what to do when this becomes 
necessary, and enforce his words through positive and 
negative sanctions. 

5. A desire for a distinct position or identity — The 
managerial job tends to require a person to behave 
differently from the ways his subordinates behave 
toward each other. He must be willing to take the 
center of the stage and assume a position of high 
visibility. 

6. A sense of responsibility — The managerial job re- 
quires getting the work out and staying on top of 
routine demands. 

Management Defined 

Now I would like to give you a simplified definition of 
management. Classically, management has been defined as 
"getting things done through other people." James Hayes, 



formerly dean of the College of Business Administration at 
Duquesne University and now president of the American 
Management Association, agrees with the above definition of 
management, but takes it one step further. He says that 
management is getting things done through other people with 
a high degree of morale and employee satisfaction. In today's 
business world it is not enough to provide a good product 
which satisfies the customer — it must also give satisfaction to 
the producer. 

Like many young men and women today, I presume, 
you're idealists. You're concerned about mounting human 
problems that previous generations — it seems — have never 
done very much about. You want to serve; you want the 
profession or occupation you choose to make a real contribu- 
tion toward building a better world. Maybe you're thinking 
vaguely of medicine, agriculture, social work, or some kind of 
teaching. 

But have you ever thought of a career in management? 
You probably connect the word management with the 
business world. And that's not for you — all those cliches 
about "the profit motive," "the organization man," "planned 
obsolescence," "the rat race" — they bother you. They 
needn't — but that's another story. What's important is that 
management is essential to every kind of human activity. 

This means, of course, that you can end up being a 
manager no matter what your chosen career or profession 
may be. Almost inevitably a person moves into management 
as he or she climbs the professional ladder. For example, after 
practicing medicine for some years, the young internist is 
selected to run the community hospital — he is now primarily 
a manager instead of a doctor. The agriculture expert 
becomes a manager when he heads a team to increase food 
production in a depressed country, or the social worker who 
heads up a big-city neighborhood house, or the teacher who 
becomes principal of the high school. They all become 
managers. 

At the turn of the century there were few professions and 
a few colleges. At that time the colleges were busy turning out 
qualified doctors, lawyers, and preachers. Nobody else — peo- 
ple thought — needed a college education. Least of all 
women — who, except for a few eccentric types, were expected 
to be wives and mothers. 

Farmers' sons stayed on the land. The sons and nephews 
of prosperous merchants found jobs in the family business. 
Less fortunate boys of 12 or 13 or 14 quit school to go to work 
in the mill or factory. If they were lucky or very ambitious, 
they might eventually work up to supervising some of the 
younger workers. 

In the past 50 years the outlook has changed drastically. 
More and more young people are going to college. About 
800,000 seniors are entering the labor market in 1974. 
Organizations everywhere, both industry and government, 
are looking for trained workers: writers, chemists, engineers, 
economists, psychologists, mathematicians, and managers. 
Management, too, has become a profession. Experience in 
one's chosen field is important, but it cannot in itself prepare 
a person to manage that job. 



SPRING 1974 



11 



Tomorrow's leaders will be concerned with the en- 
vironmental and social impact of their goals and decisions. 
They will need to cope with more uncertainties and make the 
best possible decisions on the basis of available expertise, 
data, and sometimes their own hunches. Because their 
decisions and activities will take place in an atmosphere of 
accelerating change, changes that seriously affect business 
and public life, they will need to be sharper in discerning their 
own strengths and weaknesses, as well as those of others. 

Management style will be more and more participative. 
It will involve consultations among and with those doing the 
work at all levels within the organization as a means of 
arriving at better decisions on activities that affect all. 

Virtually all jobs will tend to be more complex and will 
have increased responsibility. Accountability and decision 
making will be delegated downward, with the management 
layer becoming thinner and some levels of management even 
being eliminated. 

The manager of the future will be required to be highly 
flexible. The rate of technological change in our nation means 
most men and women will have to change careers at least five 
times in their working lives, and change jobs much more often 
than that. This means greater opportunities for most people, 
and they should come as a welcome challenge rather than a 
threat. 
Skills are Needed 

Now let's look at some of the more specific skills that the 
manager of the future will need. "Challenging," "demand- 
ing," "dynamic," "strenuous" are a few of the adjectives 
being used by managers to describe their jobs. Being an effec- 
tive manager has never been easy and it's getting more dif- 
ficult every day. 

Do you work well with others, or are you better off doing 
the job alone? A manager cannot be so withdrawn that he or 
she fails to communicate with people. The manager cannot 
feel so superior that he or she has no faith in associates or so 
impatient that he or she has trouble adjusting to what is con- 
sidered their level. 

The manager must have intellectual curiosity. The 
manager must be alert to the knowledge explosion that's 
going on around us. The manager must be able to soak up 
facts and figures so that he or she can turn almost any form of 
information to good advantage. 

The manager needs to understand modern information- 
gathering and decision-making techniques. The manager 
must understand the scientific approach to problem- 
solving — defining the problem, determining the facts, 
weighing the alternatives, and then making the best possible 
choice. 

The manager no longer sees people as just another com- 
modity to be bought and used. The manager no longer 
assumes that people are lazy, that they have to be coerced into 
working, that they shun responsibility and are interested only 
in security. The manager recognizes that people like and want 
to work, that neither money nor fear of punishment is the 
powerful motivator it used to be, and that the average person 
not only accepts but wants responsibility. The manager 
knows that human resources are his or her most valuable 
asset. 



A manager must be a positive person who sees clearly 
what has to be done. A manager must inspire confidence and 
enthusiasm. Often, with no great personal magnetism or 
brilliance, the manager can induce his or her followers to ac- 
complish more than they thought possible. 

Managers, like organizations, come in assorted sizes and 
styles. There is no uniform pattern, no one combination of 
qualities. Whoever aspires to leadership must know his or her 
strengths and weaknesses, make full use of the strengths and 
minimize the weaknesses, develop him or herself by every 
available means. The process never ends, for successive levels 
demand new and often quite different skills. What may be 
adequate for the plant foreman or the office supervisor may 
not qualify that person for the job of department head or vice 
president. 

Theoretically, it's still possible to start as mail clerk and 
end up as Chairman of the Board. However, the odds against 
this type of progression are very high. In seeking out manage- 
ment talent, organizations are looking for the college 
graduate. To get into a management position, what kind of 
college degree is best? There is no easy answer here. Some 
companies prefer the liberal-arts type, while others prefer the 
business school graduate. From my own biased viewpoint, I 
think the ideal background is a four-year liberal arts course 
complete with economics, history, sociology, government, 
and psychology. It would be ideal if this person could then go 
on for one more year for some graduate work at one of the 
business schools. 

At the very minimum, the manager's preparation for his 
or her career should provide several basic tools. 

* First, the ability to express oneself effectively in 
spoken and written English 

* Second, the ability to listen and observe 

* Third, the ability to read great quantities of material, 
extract the important from the unimportant and put it 
to work usefully 

* Finally, the manager's education must equip him or 
her to accept change and meet it successfully. The 
world is changing; the organization and job are 
changing; the manager must keep on growing and en- 
courage others to grow. The manager can't assume 
that once the diploma is received he or she can leave 
textbooks and classrooms behind. 



Management Opportunities 

What opportunities are there in business, industry, and 
government for the college graduate through the remainder 
of the '70s? According to a recent survey by U.S. Sews and 
World Report and the Endicott Survey at Northwestern 
University, the decline in job opportunities in the early 1970s 
has reached a plateau and the picture is quite healths for the 
remainder of the decade. There will be many more oppor- 
tunities in all fields of endeavor except in elementary and 
secondary teaching positions — these are on the decline. If you 
prefer to pursue advanced degrees, there are great oppor- 
tunities in the science field. The opportunities for women and 
the minority groups are greater than ever before and appear 
to be increasing in the coming years. As you probably know. 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



in the past there has been a considerable gap in the salaries 
paid to men and women doing the same jobs. This is rapidly 
being remedied. With some exceptions, the college woman to- 
day can expect to enter the labor force at the same salary 
being offered her male counterpart. 

Now let's examine some salary figures that you might 
expect on an entry level job, perhaps as a management 
trainee. In the Harrisburg area, for instance, the going rate is 
somewhere between $9000 and $9300. This includes our in- 
formation on business and industry and State government 
positions. Of course, there are fringe benefits on top of the 
salary and these do vary from one organization to another. If 
you have a specialized degree in the sciences or data 
processing, you can expect to start perhaps $1000 or $3000 
higher. 

What about the promotional opportunities for the 
management trainee. In most business there are "line" and 
"staff management. The line managers are responsible for 
actually making the product or providing the service. The 
staff managers have specialized knowledge and act in an ad- 
visory or support capacity to the line people. 

Let's look at some of these positions. In production, the 
line management runs something like this: foreman or super- 
visor, department head, plant manager, general manager, 
vice president, president. Then, in the staff management 
capacity there are planning and scheduling, building and 
equipment maintenance, quality control, etc. 

In marketing, the line begins with salesman and leads up 
through the sales supervisor, district sales manager, regional 
sales manager, and general manager to the vice president and 
president. Marketing also has its staff activities in sales 
forecasting, sales training, marketing research, advertising 
and promotion, and customer service. 

There are many staff opportunities in the personnel func- 
tion with its recruiters, employment interviewers, contract 
negotiators, training specialists, wage and salary ad- 
ministrators and employee benefits specialists — all of these 
positions handling details of the employer/employee 
relationships. 

Then, too. there is data processing which in a few years 
has penetrated every corner of the organization with its com- 
puter operators, programmers, and systems analysts. The list 
is endless — whatever the organization. 

Why are people drawn into the management area and 
why, once they're caught up in the hectic atmosphere of 
modern organizational life, do they throw themselves into it 
with fervor? 

Part of the explanation surely lies in being "where the ac- 
tion is," and in a position to influence it. This never-ending 
challenge is what executives mean when they try to explain 
the excitement of their jobs. It is a shared excitement in which 
people work together regardless of position, toward their 
various goals, always willing, often with enthusiasm. 

"Politics" and Advancement 

Now let's look at another aspect of the business 
organization which is rarely discussed but is always present 
regardless of where you go to work. I am now speaking of the 
political environment. You may be very intelligent and a 
technical whiz in your particular job. However, if you do not 



understand the politics of your company or organization, you 
are not going to make a lot of progress. 

Maybe you have already read this book. If not, I recom- 
mend it to you before graduation. This is Bravely, Bravely in 
Business by Richard R. Conarroe. Here are a few of his rules 
for being successful in business. First, Conarroe says, you 
must learn that it is not so much what you know as who you 
know. Then there are some additional rules that he suggests 
you might follow: 

* Rule 1 advises you to stay in close touch with people 
who can help you. 

* Rule 2 points out that situations can change in an in- 
stant — so watch for trends. Better still, understand 
what's going on and become the trend-setter yourself. 

* Rule 3 says that you must always remember you are a 
salesman. The expensive merchandise you're selling 
is yourself, with your manner, your attitude, and the 
way you speak. If you feel enthusiasm it will show up 
in your phone calls, your letters, your reports, and 
your work. 

* Rule 4 advises you to consider the future significance 
of everything you say and do. With that in mind, be 
nice to everybody — you never know who your boss is 
going to be tomorrow. 

* Rule 5 tells you to watch your relationships with the 
higher-ups. Some people above you in your organiza- 
tion may be less competent than you. They can be 
dangerous. They can feel resentful of your ability and 
will seek to undermine you at every opportunity. The 
only way to handle them is to make them look 
good — even at your own expense. 

Conarroe rephrases the old Know Thyself adage. He 
says to find out what you can do better than anyone else, then 
go ahead and do it. To win your boss's respect, you must offer 
him honesty and truth. Since truth is in short supply, it will 
help you to rise to the top. Develop the art of risk taking. It's 
an ability that will make you different from most others in 
your field. Whatever your direction, go ahead with con- 
fidence. Let people feel you're winning even when you seem to 
be losing. Keep smiling. Everyone likes a good loser and 
wants to be near a winner. Make enemies if you have to, but 
keep them to a minimum. The word revenge should not be in 
your vocabulary. It can cause your downfall. 

These are the political rules you must remember, accord- 
ing to John Conarroe. 

The true "organization man" or "organization woman" 
always responds instinctively to the organization's re- 
quirements and the opportunities it provides. It is his or her 
natural environment. Far from being crushed by it, the 
organization person makes an increasing impact upon it. The 
higher in the organization one climbs, the greater he or she is 
able to shape it in accordance with the concepts of service, and 
its purpose as he or she sees it. 

Remember, the end result will depend not on ambition 
alone. It will depend on the individual's quality as a person, 
on the ability to turn opportunity to advantage, and most of 
all on one's breadth of vision and understanding. 

There are no guarantees, but the manager accepts 
that — that's the way the real manager wants it. 



SPRING 1974 



13 




Late in March a modest news release appeared from 
Susquehanna announcing that the Department of Com- 
munication and Theatre Arts had "scheduled two Saturday 
presentations of 'Aesop's Falables' for the special entertain- 
ment of children under its Theatre for Young People 
program." The musical version of "Falables," which means 
fractured fables and is pronounced "fallible," was performed 
in tiny Benjamin Apple Theatre with its limited seating 
capacity. Groups which might like to see the show were asked 
to request separate performances, either on campus or at 
their own schools or churches. Ron Sydow, instructor in 
theatre arts and director of the production, was hopeful that 
he would receive one or two such requests so that more kids 
could be reached and his cast could have extra performing op- 
portunities. 

Before the ink was dry, however, requests began pouring 
in and it soon became impossible to comply with all demands. 
The rock musical played to day care and nursery groups, 
enrichment classes of local Intermediate Units, an elemen- 
tary school, a church group and a district church group, and 
closed its season at the Lewisburg Art Festival on May 1 1. 
What had begun as an experiment "seeking the response of 
the community for live theatre for young people" was even- 
tually seen by some 2000 persons in nine ideal, small-audience 
performances. 

"Falables," written by Ed Graczyk with music by 
Shirley Hansen, is a re-telling of some of Aesop's most pop- 
ular tales, acted and sung by versatile student performers 
playing a variety of very funny roles. The characters have 
such names are Thadius T. Tortoise, Clarissa Crow, Roxanne 
Rabbit, Nurse Stork, Mr. Grass Hopper, and Wilfred M. 
Wolf — who protests Aesop's unfair treatment of wolves in 
the original fables and insists on the chance to prove to the 
audience through the falables his true virtuous and innocent 
nature. 



He who 

pleasures children 

will be 

remembered 

with pleasure 

by men. 

—JAMES BOSWELL 






















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Above: Director Sydow fin sweater) looks over the program 
with Sadie Sheep iCarlen Schmidt '77. Paramus. NJ.) and 
Wilfred M Wolf (Paul LaBarr '75. Easlon. Pa. I. The program 
was printed on heavy stock and included instructions for 
coloring and culling out Wilfred's mask on the reverse 
side Below: Amelia Eagle I Kate Sheehy '77. .Xorristown, 
Pa.) takes a plane ride with Thadius T. Tortoise I Bob 
\iselv '77, Hummelstown. Pa.) and Jack in the Box i Liz 
Zeigler 77. Summit N.J.). That's Wilfred in the back. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 





Left: Mathilda Mouse (Shirley Bailey 77. Parkton. Mdl 
and Mod Mouse (Kari Cretella 77, Bran ford. Ct.l in the 
Country Mouse and City Mouse scene. Nurse Stork 
I Cathy Pitcock 77, Harlsdale. N.Y.)and Wilfred Wolf admire 
a new baby. Thadius Tortoise and Clarissa Crow (Kay Shroyer 
'74. Shamokin. Pa. I watch Roxanne Rabbit (Louisa Esser 77, 
Kutztown. Pa. I lake an early lead in the famous race. Below: 
The young audience was welcome to talk with performers and 
check out props at the end of the show. And. who can resist 
trying out the cloud-making machine 7 Choral director for 
"Falables" was Prise ilia Hall '74 of H addon field. NJ. 
and choreographer was Jane Cleary 76 of Westfield. N.J. 




by D. EDGAR HUTCHISON 



D Edgar Hutchison '34 joined the Susquehanna University 
staff as a part-time associate in development in January 
after completing an active and productive career with 
the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. During his last 
five years with Firestone, he was sales manager for the 
Harrisburg District. Always one to take an active and 
vocal interest in Susquehanna, Ted and his wife, the 
former Aberdeen Phillips '34. were given the Alumni 
Award for Service on Alumni Day in 1972. Residing at 
763 Vista Dr.. Camp Hill. Pa. 1701 1, he now spends part 
of his time visiting alumni and friends of the University 
and encouraging them to consider taking an active interest 
in Susquehanna and its future. This brief article will 
acquaint the reader with Ted and outline some of his 
thoughts about higher education and. more particularly, 
about Susquehanna University. Mr. Hutchison is available 
to discuss Susquehanna with alumni at any time and can 
provide information about Deferred Giving, a vital topic 
and a vital ingredient in the University's future. 
He may be reached at home or through the Development 
Office. Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 



The University and the Alumnus: 



IT CAN BE A 
MUTUALLY 
BENEFICIAL 
RELATIONSHIP 



On more than one occasion in recent years I suspect that my 
enthusiasm for the University has become obsessive, and my 
wife has been heard to comment, "For heaven's sake, Ted, 
quit talking about Susquehanna! People get tired of hearing 
about it all the time." Perhaps so, but people with sales ex- 
perience recognize the need to be enthusiastic about 
something in which they believe. Higher education in general 
and Susquehanna in particular are, for me, easy to promote. 
As the Class of 1 934 celebrates its 40th reunion, the memories 
of years past tend to fade but the meaning of the University in 
our lives begins to take an even sharper image. My concern is 
not simply what Susquehanna did for me, my wife or my son 
but. more importantly, what Susquehanna can do for future 
generations of students. 



My purpose in spending time with the University at this 
point in my life is to do what I can to ensure that the Sus- 
quehanna type of education remains viable and within the 
reach of students from all socio-economic backgrounds. 
Furthermore, there is, it seems to me, an obligation for those 
of us who have received the benefits instilled by the presence 
in our lives of Sheldon, Houtz, Woodruff, Fisher. Gilbert. 
Gait. Russ, Stagg and countless others to consider the ways 
and means available to us to make this type of education and 
exposure permanent at Susquehanna. Over the years the 
faces and names of faculty and staff change, but the type of 
education engendered at Susquehanna by its faculty remains 
as important today as it did 20. 30, or 40 years ago. 

Much is written today about the pressures exerted on 
colleges and universities. Survival itself is a concern of some. 
This need not be a problem if alumni and friends will consider 
the matter one of personal concern and attempt to assist 
Susquehanna in planning for the future. 

To help meet this challenge, the University has activated 
a deferred giving program in an attempt to provide its alumni 
and friends with information about the various means of 
assuring the University's future. This need not be a One Way 
Street, since providing for Susquehanna by bequest or trust 
can be mutually beneficial to both institution and alumnus. 
Tax considerations are important, and it is often shown that a 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



bequest or other form of charitable gift can actually be 
economical and even reduce the donor's estate tax burden. 

The S.U. Deferred Giving Program is informative and 
seeks to provide guidance. In no way does the University con- 
sider itself qualified to serve as legal counsel. In fact, our sole 
purpose is to stimulate thought and bring alumni to the point 
of talking this matter over with iegal or financial counsel. 

It is estimated that as much as 90 percent of a college's 
endowment funds are derived from deferred gifts. Such funds 
are important in that they provide annual income for in- 
creased faculty salaries and scholarship aid. In these days of 
rapid inflation, well paid faculty are the lifeblood of an in- 
stitution trying to remain competitive, while scholarship aid 
assures the continued availability of Susquehanna to students 
from all economic backgrounds. With proper planning 
through the use of bequests and trusts, alumni and friends will 
be surprised how many can help the University in this regard 
and, at the same time, guarantee the financial security of 
beneficiaries. 

To stress the importance of the deferred gift, it will be of 
interest to note that this year alone the University will receive 
over $ 1 50,000 in bequests from alumni and friends. Over the 
past decade the University has received well over $1 million 
from alumni and friends through deferred gifts. These 
testamentary gifts have been given for specified pur- 
poses — such as scholarships — or as unrestricted endowment 



funds. Like most church-related institutions, Susquehanna 
has a meager endowment of about $2 million. Over the next 
decade this sum must increase at least fivefold to generate the 
income needed to ensure a continued balanced budget that 
will provide for expanded educational opportunities. 
Specifically, much of the future of the University rests with 
alumni in our willingness to find the means to help strengthen 
its academic and financial resources. This was true of alumni 
in the days when we were students and it is particularly 
applicable today. 

We ask alumni to investigate the possibility of a deferred 
gift to Susquehanna. I will be happy to talk with you about 
this matter and provide information for your review. There is 
no obligation. The size of bequests received in recent years 
has varied from $1000 to $250,000. Gifts of all sizes are equal- 
ly important in proportion to the ability of the alumnus to 
provide for Susquehanna while, at the same time, providing 
for family and other beneficiaries. 

I hope that you will give this matter some thought. Ask 
for information; we will be happy to answer your questions. 
The most important thing is that all alumni consider the need 
for a will and for formulating an estate plan. It is often sur- 
prising how proper planning will better accommodate the 
needs of loved ones and. in many cases, provide an opportuni- 
ty to help assure the continued good work of your favorite 
charitable organizations. 




This recent aerial pholo 
reveals the dramatic increase 
in the size of the Susquehanna 
University library, now the 
Roger M. Blough Learning 
Center. The left front portion 
(distinguishable by a slight 
difference in roof color I was 
buill in 1928, the remainder 
of the front in 1958. and the 
extension to the rear was 
completed last winter. Now 
occupying some 47,000 square 
feet, the building also 
includes areas for environmental 
studies, educational media, 
music listening components, 
and a television studio. 



SPRING 1974 



17 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'23 

John W. Billinger was reelected chair- 
man of the Snyder County Board of 
Assistance. Vice chairman is Dr. Robert 
L. Bradford, associate professor of 
political science at Susquehanna, and ex- 
ecutive director is Terry R. Kissinger '64. 

Marlyn and Mabel Kinsey Felterolf '24 
celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary 
last November 28 with a family dinner 
followed by a reception at the Sunehanna 
Country Club, Johnstown, Pa. Son Frank 
graduated from Susquehanna in '48 and 
daughter Marilyn in '54. Grandchildren in- 
clude Don '70. whose wife is the former 
Karen Kaneen x'71, and Sharon '68, 
married to Sieve Vak '68. 



'24 

The Rev. W. John Derr and his wife 
have returned from a tour of the USSR 
and satellites. 

x'24 

R W. Coleman retired as vice president 
and director of the Tri-County National 
Bank in Middleburg after 26 years of ser- 
vice. He has been Mayor of Beavertown 
for five years and Justice of the Peace for 
36 years. 

'25 

Dr. Christie Zimmerman, Lutheran 
missionary in Guntur, India, returned to 
the U.S. this spring and is doing some 
deputation work for the remainder of the 
year before retirement. Her address will be: 
c/o Mrs. Raymond Sheets, 409 E. 
Cumberland St., Lebanon Pa. 17042. 



'27 

Dewey S. Herrold was presented the 
SAR Past President's Award at a recent 
dinner-meeting of the William Maclay 
Sons of the American Revolution and the 
Conrad Weiser and Fort Augusta DAR 
chapters of Sunbury and Selinsgrove. 
Featured as a centerpiece for the table was 
a display of all 27 American flags used 
since the nation's founding. The flags were 
presented to the chapter by Martha 
Laudenslager Davis '3 1 . Dewey and Frank 
C. Gill '31 were named by the Snyder 
County Commissioners to the area's 
Bicentennial Committee. 




Emeriti group and the 50th Reunion Class. 



'29 

Dr. Harold Moldenke has accepted the 
title of Honorary Curator in the Her- 
barium at the New York Botanical 
Garden, Bronx, N.Y. 

'30 

John F. Delay has retired as Pittsburgh 
area branch manager for Motors In- 
surance Corp. (Division of General 
Motors) after 37 years of service. He has 
been out of touch with Susquehanna since 
1942, but was due to return to campus for 
Alumni Weekend. 

'31 

The Rev. Frank L. McCormick retired 
and became pastor emeritus of First 
Presbyterian Church, Fort Morgan, Colo., 
where he served since 1 947. A graduate of 
Princeton Theological Seminary, he was a 
U.S. Navy chaplain during World War II 



and has held other pastorates in York, Pa. 
and Fresno, Calif. His wife, a retired Latin 
teacher at Fort Morgan H.S., is the former 
Emma Baxter '28. 

x'31 

W. Michael Weader, former superinten- 
dent of Selinsgrove schools, received the 
American Education Medal Award at the 
recent National Awards program of the 
Freedoms Foundation in Valley Forge, Pa. 

'32 

Eleanor Sheriff McAnully, who earned 
the M.L.S. in 1 969 from the University of 
Pittsburgh, is librarian in the Blairsville- 
Saltsburg school district. Pa. 

x'32 

Dorothy Arbogasl Kaltriter retires at 
the end of this school year as an elemen- 
tary teacher in Smyrna, Ga. Husband 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Oren '30 continues delighting Cobb Coun- 
ty school children with his educational 
Musichemagic show and is now president 
of the local Golden Age Club. 

'34 

The Rev. Earnest W. Huston, who 
previously served St. Peter's Lutheran 
Church, Lancaster, Pa., is vice pastor of 
Ascension Lutheran Church, Quakake, 
and Christ Lutheran Church, Rush 
Township, Pa. His new address is 
Quakake Lutheran Parsonage 
(Hometown), R.D. 2, Tamaqua, Pa. 
18252. 

'40 

Kenneth R. and Naomi Bingaman 
Kinney have taken early retirement from 
their teaching positions in the Harrison 
(N.Y.) public schools and are now living 
temporarily at 1116 Arizona S.E., Albu- 
querque, N.M. 87108. Naomi plans to 
continue teaching remedial reading. 

'43 

Seniors in the Selinsgrove Area H.S. 
business department now have oppor- 
tunities for six-week, work-experience in- 
ternships, thanks to a program designed 
and proposed by Emagean Pennsyl Whit- 
moyer '43, department chairman. 

'44 

Margaret Gemmill Janson was elected 
to serve on the board of the Lankenau 
School in Philadelphia. A psychologist for 
the North Penn school district, her hus- 
band is Dr. William A. Janson Jr., presi- 
dent of the LCA's Southeastern Penn 
Synod. 

'46 

Dr. Roswell J. Johns was named to the 
faculty of the Milton S. Hershey Medical 
Center of Penn State University. He will 
serve as clinical lecturer of family and 
community medicine. His wife is the 
former Gayle Clark '47 and they live in 
Millerstown, Pa. 

'47 

Jacqueline Braveman Mayper and hus- 
band Myron have moved to 16622 Glen- 
brook Blvd., Fountain Hills, Ariz. 85268. 
Their daughter Merrill recently earned her 
B.A. from George Washington University 
and Robin is a freshman at Dickinson 
College. Their two sons are Laurence and 
Charles. 



It took two pix for the 45th turnout- 40th and 35lh 



SPRING 1974 



19 




10th, 25th, 20th and 10th. The 15th didn't show. 



'48 

A. V. "Ai" Derr was named training ad- 
ministrator at the Sperry New Holland 
worldwide headquarters in New Holland, 
Pa., effective in January. He was formerly 
personnel administrator at the Belleville 
plant. He, his wife, the former Phyllis 
Swart: '49, and family now live at 25 N. 
Hershey Ave., Leola, Pa. 17540. 

The Rev. Charles L Lady has been ap- 
pointed staff assistant to the president of 
the Central Pennsylvania Synod, LCA. He 
serves as the president's representative to 
three districts in the western part of the 
synod. He and his wife, the former Eleanor 
Steel '48, and their four children live in 
Somerset, Pa. 

'49 

Elwood M. McAllister was promoted to 
area director for upstate New York. Boy 
Scouts of America, with responsibilities in- 
cluding supervision of the scouting 
program throughout the state with the ex- 
ception of New York City and Long 
Island. His daughter is Katie McAllister 
'77. 

'50 

Donald E. Wissinger was elected a 
director of the Altoona Area Chamber of 
Commerce. Since leaving his faculty posi- 
tion at Susquehanna to enter business with 
his father in 1969. Don has become very 
active in civic affairs. He also serves on the 
Commission on Higher Education of the 
LCA's Central Pennsslvania Synod. 

'55 

Bruce A. Bell, an account manager for 
Johnson & Johnson Baby Products in 
Philadelphia, won the highest sales honor 
given by the company in 1973 when he was 
elected to the Sales Hall of Fame. The 
award is based on professional ability, 
reputation for quality of leadership in the 
trade and among sales associates, and 
responsibility as a participating citizen in 
community affairs. He and his wife, the 
former Deborah Krapf'%, and their three 
children live at 1010 Robwill Pass. Cherry 
Hill. N.J. 

Dr. Donald R Walk is now located in 
Carmichael. Calif., as medical director for 
Sierra View Mental Health Services, a 
non-profit corporation providing services 
to five northeastern counties in California. 
The foundation recently received the Gold 
Award for the nation's outstanding com- 
munity mental health program from the 
American Psychiatric Association's 
Hospital and Communilv Psychiatry Ser- 
vice. 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Richard E. McCarty was named con- 
troller for carpet operations of Armstrong 
Cork Co. His wife is the former Suzanne 
Beal x - 57. 

'56 

James Hill, operator of Susquehanna 
Hobbies in Selinsgrove, was appointed to 
the boro's Planning Commission, which is 
chaired by George Tamke, assistant to the 
president at S.U. 

'57 

Joseph J. Scully has been appointed vice 
president of manufacturing at Rodale 
Manufacturing^., Emmaus, Pa. His wife 
is the former Belly Ann Ormond '58. 

x'57 

Marilyn Slyoff Simon is a violinist with 
the Fort Lauderdale Symphony Orchestra 
and the Miami Beach Symphony 
Orchestra. She and husband Robert, son 
of Susquehanna Board member Carl 
Simon, live at 4240 N.E. 26th Ter., 
Lighthouse Point, Fla. 33064. 

Rila Williamson Neago is executive 
secretary to the vice president - general 
counsel of Procter & Gamble Co. in Cin- 
cinnati. She and husband Steve are the 
parents of two sons and live at 7401 S. 
Timberland Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 45243. 

'58 

Richard H. Cahn, assistant executive 
director of the Berks County (Pa.) 
Intermediate Unit, attended the annual 
Congress of American Industry in New 
York at the invitation of the Manufac- 
turers Association of Berks County. 

Terri Feliciana Hunt is assistant to the 
manager of agency sales of Hawaiian 
Holidays, Inc. She recently had the oppor- 
tunity to spend a few days with Dick and 
Peg Paltyson Neff '59 in Hawaii, where 
Dick was on a business trip. 

The Rev. Robert A. Kerchoff is now 
pastor of the New Berlin (Pa.) Lutheran 
Charge. 

Lt/Cmdr William R Hand, U.S.N., is 
now stationed at the Naval Air Station in 
the Philippines. He has been in the Navy 
since graduation from Susquehanna. 

'59 

Mary Davis Heisey performed the 
leading role in the York Little Theatre 
production of "I'll Get My Man." Her 
husband John is staff assistant to the Abby 
Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection, 
Williamsburg, Va., for which he is writing 
a checklist of Jacquard coverlet weavers. 



Joseph F. Shepard has advanced to 
senior engineering manager at IBM in the 
East Fishkill (N.Y.) Systems Products 
Division facility. His wife is the former 
Mary Ann Traher '62 and they have two 
children, Allison and Joseph Jr. 

'61 

Frank Beatly is now teaching plumbing 
at Williamsport Area Community College. 
He is married to the former Joanna Smith 
x'62 and they live at 410 Hepburn St., 
Milton, Pa. 17847. 

The Rev. Elmer H. Eiche, formerly at 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Buck Run, Pa., 
is now pastor of Zion Lutheran Church, 
Lebanon Township, N.J. 

AG. Terry Shaffer was promoted to 
manager of program development of 
Kiwanis International, located in Chicago. 
He is also a member of the President's 
Committee on Employment of the Han- 
dicapped and the Steering Committee of 
National Voluntary Organizations. 

Jacquelyn Barber Toy is librarian at 
Rochambeau Branch Library, Providence, 
R.I. She received her M.L.S. from Kent 
State University in 1969. She and her 
daughter Deborah are living at 31 Old 
Carriage Rd., Apt. 69, West Warwick, 
R.I. 02893. 

'62 

Dr. Paul Tressler has entered a 
partnership and opened offices for the 
general practice of law under the name of 
Tressler & Lapp in Franconia, Pa. His 
wife, the former Judith Brndjar, teaches 
French at Souderton H.S. and they have a 
daughter Romy. 

Dr. James H. Parker Jr. and his wife, 
the former Barbara Lovell '64, have moved 
to Maine where Jim is on the staff at 
Husson College. Their new address is 33 S. 
4th St., Old Town, Me. 04468. 

Ron Foye coached his Line Mountain 
H.S. girls varsity basketball team to an un- 
beaten season and the '73-'74 cham- 
pionship of the 10-team Susquehanna 
Valley Girls Basketball League. 

'63 

Marvin J. Malone is an electrical 
engineer at the Aerospace Division of 
Westinghouse Electric near Baltimore. He 
has been with Westinghouse for the past 
six years. 

x'63 

The Rev. David L. Martin has been ap- 
pointed administrative assistant, secretary, 
statistician and archivist of the North 
Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church in 
America. 




Bell '55 and )'oung '66 




Nixon '67 and Cu::olina '67 



'64 

The Rev. John M. Voughl Jr. is pastor 
of Emmanuel and St. John's Lutheran 
Churches in Brickerville, Pa., under an ex- 
perimental four-year contract call. He was 
formerly pastor of Union Deposit 
Lutheran Church. 

Thomas Cole is project manager for the 
building department of Agway, Inc. His 
territory includes northeastern Penn- 
sylvania and he has moved his family to 
117 Crestwood Townhouse, R.D. 2, 
Moscow, Pa. 18444. 

Capt. William E. Lindsay is instructing 
jet pilots at Shaw AFB, S.C. Bill and his 
wife, the former Sally Schnure '65, live 
with their two children at 500 Arnold Ave., 
Sumter, S.C. 29150. 

James M. Wilde has been promoted to 
clinical social worker, supervisor, in the 
Community Mental Health Center at the 
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa. 
He is assigned to the outpatient unit. 

'65 

Bonnie Baum Castellion is the new 
librarian at Murrysville (Pa.) Community 
Library. She was previously children's 
librarian at the Carnegie Library of 
Pittsburgh. 

Arthur Bowen, who purchased a real es- 
tate business in Selinsgrove last year, has 
changed its name to Bowen Agency 



SPRING 1974 



21 



Realtors. Bill Bowen '69 is a realtor 
associate in the business. 

Carl L Campbell has been promoted to 
administrative vice president of the Penn- 
sylvania National Bank & Trust Co. of 
Pottsville, Pa. 

Dr. Peter Matson, an attorney, is a 
director of the Lewisburg (Pa.) Area 
Chamber of Commerce. His wife, the 
former Marjorie Blair '63, is guidance 
counselor at Shikellamy Area school dis- 
trict. Sunbury. 

'66 

Herbert Boeltger Jr has been appointed 
supervisor of supplies and services for the 
Abington (Pa.) school district. He also 
supervises the district's department of 
transportation. 

Thomas J. Young was appointed assis- 
tant vice president of the Philadelphia 
National Bank. He has been with the bank 
since 1966. Tom is married to the former 
Jane Hunter and they have two children. 

'67 

Michael J Cuzzolina Jr. has been ap- 
pointed director of financial planning for 
the UGI Corp., Philadelphia. Mike is a 
member of the American and Penn- 
sylvania Institutes of Certified Public Ac- 
countants. He and his family live in 
Royersford, Pa. 

Jeanne Damgaard Taylor is teaching 
English part-time while her husband is a 
graduate student at Oregon State Univer- 
sity. Their new address is 148 N.W. 33rd 
St., Corvallis, Ore. 97330. 



Diane Heller Nixon has been named a 
personnel officer of The Fidelity Bank. 
Philadelphia. She is a member of the 
women's personnel group. 

Ronald J. Yevitz received his MBA. 
degree with a concentration in finance 
from the University of Scranton. He is ex- 
ecutive director of Junior Achievement of 
Greater Scranton. Inc.. a non-profit 
business education program for high 
school students. He and his wife Linda, an 
elementary teacher, reside at 1 16 Lake St., 
Dalton, Pa. 18414. 

'68 

Gerald R Pacella has been named an 
assistant vice president of The Fidelity 
Bank, Philadelphia. He began working for 
the bank in 1968 and in 1972 was elected 
an assistant treasurer. 

The Rev../. Fred Lehr, formerly at Zion 
Lutheran Church. Johnstown, is second 
pastor of Christ Lutheran Church, Lan- 
caster, Pa. He and his wife, the former 
Janet Senft x'70, are living at 407 La- 
fayette St., Lancaster. 

Robert E Forse has been promoted to 
the official staff of the First National Bank 
of Eastern Pennsylvania as assistant 
cashier in the Bloomsburg office. 

Capt. Michael W. Lichty was awarded 
his silver wings at Moody AFB, Ga., upon 
graduation with honors from U.S. Air 
Force pilot training. He received the Air 
Training Command Commander's Trophy 
as the most outstanding graduate of his 
class. He is assigned to MacDill AFB, 
Fla., for Hying duty with the Tactical Air 
Command. 




The Rev Richard D Reichard '60. assistant pastor-superintendent of the 
National Lutheran Home in Washington. DC . is congratulated by Mrs. 
Elsie Senft at the Winter Convocation of George Washington University 
in Constitution Hall, where he was con/erred with the MA. in health care 
administration. Mr\ Scull is one of 49 residents of the home 
who came 10 the convocation wearing red velvet roses in Dick's honor 



John C Paterson is now an accountant 
with "L'eggs" division. Hanes Hosiery. He 
lives at 2367 Bethabara Rd., Apt. C2. 
Winston Salem. N.C. 27106. 

'69 

Sally Ann Trace is the new order 
librarian for the Conococheague Library 
District, Pa. She earned her M.L.S. degree 
from the University of Pittsburgh. 

Jim Page was featured in a newspaper 
article in The Spirit, Warminster, Pa., 
which covered his background and present 
activity at Tri-Valley H.S. where he 
teaches and is head football coach. 

Harrv E Guetzlafl is national adver- 
tising manager for Dr. Pepper Co. with 
headquarters in Dallas. Tex. He is married 
to the former Jane Warren, a stewardess. 

Capt. Alan H. Cooper, a first-year 
teacher at Linsly Military Institute in 
Wheeling, W.Va., has created great in- 
terest in archeology among his students. 
An article in The News Register of Wheel- 
ing described some of the digs his classes 
have conducted at Indian mound sites in 
the area. 

Robert E. Guise is assistant manager. 
Policyowners Service Division of Ken- 
tucky Central Life Insurance Co. His wife, 
the former Andrea Bower, teaches 5th 
grade at St. Peter School and they reside 
at 3482 Birkenhead Dr., Lexington. Ky. 
40503. 

'70 

Kathleen Van Order Bowen earned a 
B.A. in education at the University of 
Florida and is now teaching 6th grade 
math in Wilmington, Del. 

Robert L. Clyde received his M.A. in 
applied mathematics and is with the Duke 
Power Corp., Charlotte, N.C. 

Anne J Herrington is coordinator of 
supplemental education services at the 
learning center of Johnson (Vt.) State 
College. 

Larry Kyse has been promoted to assis- 
tant controller for Ipco Hospital Supply 
Corp. He and his wife, the former 
Christine Richards '69, and their daughter 
Julie live at 37 Raleigh Rd., Kendall Park. 
N.Y. 08824. 

J Thomas L'hler is manager of the 
laboratory. Department of Biological 
Sciences, Florida Technological Universi- 
ty, Orlando. 

'71 

Bruce Svare received his master's degree 
in psychology from Bucknell University. 
He and his wife are living in East 
Brunswick, N.J. while he continues 
graduate work in psychobiology at 
Rutgers. 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




The Class of '74 
poses for Us 
first "reunion.'' 



Denny Packard is a supply systems 
analyst at the U.S. Navy Supply Depot in 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Linda Maier Klemeyer received the 
master's degree in education from the 
University of Pittsburgh. She teaches 
biology and earth science at Delaware 
Valley Sr. H.S., Milford, Pa. (not Port 
Jervis, N.Y., as reported earlier). Husband 
John '70 is associated with the law firm of 
Finan, Beecher, Wagner, & Rose, also in 
Milford. 

Dr. Dorothy B. Porter hon, now a con- 
sultant to the Howard University Library, 
was given a Howard Alumni Achievement 
Award in March. A 1928 graduate, she 
was also honored when the university 
designated a Dorothy B. Porter Room "as 
a tribute to the guiding force behind the 
tremendous success" of the historic 
Moorland-Spingarn Collection of Negro 
Life and History. 

72 

Kathleen Buckwalter is the new 
children's librarian for the central branch 
of the Harrisburg Public Library. 

Melody Hill and Jo Ann Chromicky are 
public relations directors for Charles G. 
Morgan Associates at Pocono Farms, Box 
7, Mt. Pocono, Pa. 18344. 

James W. Crum is manager of the food 
service division at East Stroudsburg State 
College. 

John B. Carey Jr. received the M.B.A. 
degree from Pennsylvania State University 
in December. 

Joan Hirsch is a sales clerk in the patio 
sportswear department for Jordan Marsh 
in Orlando, Fla. 

Dalton W. Savidge was promoted to 
production coordinator-distribution in 
PP&L's distribution department at the 
Susquehanna Division Service Center in 
Montoursville, Pa. He is married to the 
former Mary Phillips Mitchell '71. They 
have two children and live at 501 N. 8th 



St., Selinsgrove. 

'73 

Peter Y. Thompson is the new property 
and wardrobe master of Theatre West 
Virginia and will play the role of 
Candlewick in "Pinocchio." He is a 
veteran of the West Virginia Historical 
Drama Association's 1973 productions of 
"Hatfields and McCoys" and "Honey in 
the Rock," in which he was a member of 
the technical crew. 

Gordon W. Clark is a trading trainee for 
Merrill Lynch Government Security Divi- 
sion in New York City. 

John P Crinnian is with a record 
producing corporation in New York City. 

Mark A. Olingy is a media specialist in 
the Shikellamy school district, Sunbury. 

James S Ehrhorn is an air personality 
with WRAW Radio in Reading, Pa. 

George Fecker is with Sunbury Dairy 
Products in Sunbury. 

Grover C. Foehlinger Jr presented an 
organ recital on a new custom built Can- 
narsa pipe organ in the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in Duncansville, Pa. He 
is organist at Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Milton. 

Mary Beth Kibbe is teaching at Mifflin- 
burg (Pa.) H.S. 

Robert W. Cole is doing graduate work 
in business at Fairleigh Dickinson Univer- 
sity. 

Denise Kleis is a credit reporter with the 
National Credit Office, New York City. 

Robert Noll is band director at 
Roosevelt Jr. H.S., Kulpmont, Pa. 

Marcia B. Wright is a chart collator in 
the medical record department at 
Morristown (N.J.) Memorial Hospital. 

Deryl R. Lutz is director of choirs and 
musical theater at York (Pa.) Suburban 
H.S. 

Susan Steigelman Trevaskis teaches 7th 
grade music at Edgar Fahs Smith Middle 
School, York, Pa. 



"J DO" 



BOBLICK-ILGENFRITZ 
Vicki Ilgenfritz to Barry T. Boblick '71, 
May 5, 1973, St. Theresa's Church, New 
Cumberland, Pa. Phil Libby '71 was an 
usher. Barry is an underwriter for General 
Accident Group, Lemoyne, Pa. / 308 
Hillcrest Dr., New Cumberland, Pa. 
17070. 

STEVENS-HASLEY 
Royce G. Hasley x'72 to Mark E. 
Stevens, May 5, 1973, Flourtown, 
Pa. / 5810 N. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
19120. 

SCHNURE-LONGBOTTOM 
Alice Carmel Longbottom to James P. 
Schnure x'69, August 1973, in California. 
Jim received his bachelor's degree in 
economics from UCLA last September. 
Prior to continuing his education he was in 
combat duty as a helicopter gunner in 
Vietnam. / 2307 Ocean Ave., Santa 
Monica, Calif. 90405. 

CALLAGHAN-CHAMBERS 
Kathleen Chambers '73 to William H. 
Callaghan '72, August 4, 1973, Plainfield, 
N.J. Kathleen is with the Department of 
Social Service, Monmouth County, N.J. 
and Bill teaches 8th grade math in the 
Middletown (N.J.) schools. / 2125 Aldrin 
Rd., Apt. 9-B, Ocean, N.J. 07712. 

JACOBUS-GRODEM 
Ingrid M. Grodem '69 to Robert V. 
Jacobus, August 12, 1973, First 
Congregational Christian Church, Ir- 
vington, N.J. Christine Grodem Ziem x'71 
and Judy Almquist x'69 were in the wed- 
ding party. Ingrid is an editorial assistant 
with General Drafting Co., Inc. and her 
husband is a draftsman with C.E. Lum- 
mus. / 2350 Rt. 10, Apt. D-28, Morris 
Plains, N.J. 07950. 



SPRING 1974 



23 



UPPERCO-BAUER 

Janet E. Bauer '74 to Alan J. Upperco 
'74, August 25, 1973, Susquehanna 
University Meditation Chapel. Chaplain 
Edgar S. Brown of S.U. officiated at the 
service. / R.D. 3, Box 284, Selinsgrove, 
Pa. 17870. 

COMBS-LUTTGENS 

Linda S. Lultgens '72 to David L. 
Combs, September 2, 1973, Our Lady of 
Lourdes Church, Mountainside, N.J. 
Among the attendants were Chester and 
Pamela Miller Schuman '72, Barbara 
Lane '73 and Linda Cave x'72. Linda is 
with the North Miami General Hospital 
and Mr. Combs is a municipal bond 
salesman for J.B. Hanover & Co. in 
Hallandale. / St. Croix Gardens, 1595 N. 
E. 135th St., Apt. 211, North Miami, Fla. 
33161. 

BUEHLER-LEMMERMAN 

Gloralie L. Lemmerman x'72 to 
Michael Buehler, October 27, 1973, Rooke 
Chapel. Bucknell University. / R.D. 1, 
Miffiinburg, Pa. 17844. 

GERARDI-BLACK 

Marilee Ann Black to Michael H. 
Gerardi '71, October 27, 1973, Broadway 
(Va.) Baptist Church. Both bride and 
groom are teaching assistants working 
toward the M.S. in biology at Madison 
College, where Mrs. Gerardi earned her 
B.A. 

ADAMS-FIELD 

Jean Field '68 to Britt Adams, 
November 8, 1973, South Congregational 
Church, Granby, Conn. Jean received the 
M.A. from Kent State University and did 
work on her Ph.D. at Vanderbilt. Mr. 
Adams, holder of a B.A. from Lehigh and 
M.A. from the University of Oklahoma, 
served in the U.S. Army Security Agency 
in England. Both are system analysts for 
Travelers Insurance Co. / 2 Foster Dr., 
Vernon, Conn. 06066. 

PETERSON-WILSON 

Deborah L. Wilson x'74 to Harold W. 
Peterson '72, November 17, 1973, First 
United Methodist Church, Dover, N.J. 
Christopher Lodewyks '72 was best man. 
Harold is a computer programmer for 
New England Life Insurance Co. / 15 
Buswell St., Apt. 8. Boston, Mass. 02215. 
SIEGEL-CAPALDI 

Linda M. Capaldi '74 to Robert S. 
Siegel '73, November 24, 1973, home of 
the groom's parents, Kew Gardens, N.Y. 
Susquehanna Chaplain Edgar S. Brown 
and Rabbi Philip Schechtter officiated at 
the service. Linda completed the re- 
quirements for her B.A. with a major in 
religion at the end of Term I last 
November. Bob is in management at 
Johanna Farms Dairy, Flemington, 
N.J. / Hunter Hills Apts., Apt. H-l, 1 



Garden Lane, Flemington, N.J. 08822. 
ECKMAN-HILBISH 

Ann E. Hilbish '71 to Dennis L. Eckman 
'73, December 1973. Ann is teaching Ger- 
man and English in Coughlin H.S., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Dennis is a marketing 
management trainee with the Burroughs 
Corp., Williamsport. / 70 Cottage St., 
Apt. 2, Hughesville, Pa. 17737. 
DIVELY-BOYNTON 

Gayle A. Boynton x'75 to Bruce L. Dive- 
ly, December 1, 1973, St. Paul's United 
Church of Christ, Selinsgrove. Dr. David 
N. Wiley, assistant professor of religion at 
S.U., performed the service. During the 
reception Rudy Gelnetl '37 provided 
music. The groom is a graduate of Lock 
Haven State College. / 312-A Kelso St., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17111. 

PHIPPS-SEARCH 

Nancy A. Search '73 to Robert A. 
Phipps '73, December 28, 1973. Nancy is 
band director at Jemez Valley municipal 
schools. / Box 4C, Canyon Route, Jemez 
Pueblo, N.M. 87024. 

STROIK-CERASA 

Pamela L. Cerasa x'75 to Francis P. 
Slroik '75. December 30, 1973, St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church, Spring Grove, Pa. 
Deborah Mathias '75 and Keith Green '75 
were in the wedding party. / 526 N. 
Seventh St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 
BIGELOW-EGAN 

Janis L. Egan '71 to John H. Bigelow 
Jr., January 5, 1974. Salem United Church 
of Christ, Harrisburg, Pa. Participating in 
the ceremony was Mary D. Donaldson '71. 
Mr. Bigelow was graduated from Drexel 
University and received a master's in elec- 
trical engineering from Stanford Universi- 
ty. He is with Bell Telephone 
Laboratories, Holmdel, N.J. / 90 Main 
St., Apt. C-12. Matawan, N.J. 07747. 
SMITH-HILL 

Beverly Hill to the Rev. Eugene L. 
Smith '42, January 20, 1974, Zion 
Lutheran Church, Hutchinson. Kans., 
where Gene was pastor for six years. He is 
now organizing a church in Van Buren. 
Ark., and continuing work already begun 
in the smaller community of 
Booneville. / P.O. Box 336. Booneville, 
Ark. 72927. 

CAMPBELL-GROSS 

Susan A. Gross to Richard A. Campbell 
x'75, January 26. 1974, Christ United 
Methodist Church, Northumberland, Pa. 
The bride is with Marlin's Sub Shop, Sun- 
bury, and Dick is assistant manager of 
Carrol's Restaurant. Danville / 836 
Susquehanna Ave., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 
AVERY-FRENCH 

Mrs. Doris J. French to Col. William B. 
Avery. February 2. 1974, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, where they 



Born Crusaders 



To Drs. John and Susan Turnbach 
Sleigerwalt x'62, their first child, a 
daughter. Eve Starr. November 1, 1972. 
Susan is a physicist at the Naval Elec- 
tronics Laboratory Center and her hus- 
band a research physicist in the Depart- 
ment of Radiology at the University of 
California, both in San Diego. / 3945 
Kenosha Ave., San Diego, Calif. 92117. 

To Dr. Thomas M. and Ronda Bender 
Roane '66, their first child, a daughter, 
Misha Lee, March 10, 1973. Dr. Roane is 
assistant professor of agricultural 
engineering at the University of 
Delaware. / 425 Arbour Dr., Arbour 
Park, Newark, Del. 19711. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Luth '66, 
their second child, a son. Robert John Jr., 
January 8, 1973. Formerly with Haskins & 
Sells. New York City, Bob is now assistant 
treasurer of Norton Simon Inc. / 4 Miles 
Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Skinner 
'64, their second daughter. Sally Ann, 
March 15. 1973. Larry is production super- 
visor for Reader's Digest. Pleasantville, 
N.Y. / Rt. 2. Box 722. Pawling, N.Y. 
12564. 

To Frank M. "Don" III and Sondra 
Weibley Morton x'64, their first child, a 
son. Hunter Munro. June 7, 1973. Mr. 
Morton was recently appointed county at- 
torney for James-City County 
(Williamsburg), Va. / 604 Tradewind 
Cir., Newport News, Va. 23602. 

To Mario L. and Cherry Appleton 
Berlanda '67, their first child, a daughter, 
Nicole Rene, June 16. 1973. Mr. Berlanda 
is a social studies teacher and assistant 
football coach at North Penn Sr. H.S.. 
Lansdale. / 260 Parry Rd.. Warminster, 
Pa. 18974. 

To Thomas D. and Jane Myers 
Schroeder x'68, their third child and first 
daughter, Jane Louise, August 9, 1973. 
Mr. Schroeder is in executive sales for R.J. 
Kunik & Co., Bala-Cynw^d, Pa. / 44 
Olde Benchmark Village. Royersford, Pa. 
19468. 

To John H. and Martha Imhof Front: 
'69. their first child, a son, Brian Jonathan. 



graduated together. Mrs. Avery was coor- 
dinator of residence affairs at Susquehan- 
na and her husband, retired from the U.S. 
Army, is now in the real estate 
business. / Milford Rd., P.O. Box 381, 
Brookline. N.H. 03033. 



24 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



born on the second wedding anniversary of 
his parents, October 9, 1973. Martha was 
formerly a reference librarian at the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and 
John is a gas engineer for Philadelphia 
Electric Co. / 101 Shannon Rd., North 
Wales, Pa. 19454. 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. Edward Huber '60, 
a son, Robert Edward, October 28, 1973. 
Ed is a classification counselor for the 
Philadelphia prisons. / 5617 Fairhill St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19120. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Louis A. Vermillion 
'70, their first child, a son, Richard Louis, 
November 2, 1973. Lou received the 
D.D.S. degree from Temple University 
School of Dentistry last August and has set 
up his own dental practice in Summit 
Hill. / 18 W.White St., Summit Hill, Pa. 
18250. 

To James D. Jr. and Nancy Rachi 
Voder '69, their first child, a daughter, 
Emily Gayle, November 3, 1973. Mr. 
Yoder teaches instrumental music at 
Mechanicsburg Jr. H.S. / 52 Scarsdale 
Dr.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 

To Drs. John V. and Suzanne Springer 
Zeok '66, their first child, a daughter. 
Suzanne Victoria. November 3, 1973. 
Both completed their residencies at 
Thomas Jefferson University Medical 
Hospital — Suzanne in anesthesiology and 
her husband in surgery. / Apt. 331-B, 301 
West Sylvania Ave., Neptune City, N.J. 
07753. 

To Thomas R. and Ann Schlegel Heinly 
'70, a son, Steven Thomas, Thanksgiving 
Day, November 22, 1973. Ann taught 
elementary vocal music for three years in 
Topton, Pa. while doing graduate work at 
Kutztown State College. Mr. Heinly is 
assistant production manager for East 
Penn Manufacturing Co., Lyon Station, 
Pa. / 1 19 N. Franklin St., Fleetwood, Pa. 
19522. 

To Edwin H. Jr. and Dr. Elinor Brandt 
Aiken x'60, their second son, Scott Eric, 
December 4, 1973. Elinor is a 
veterinarian. / 10910 Walnut Dr., 
Sunland, Calif. 91040. 

To Dr. David N. and Doris Kenner 
Holcomb '58, their fourth child and first 
daughter, Kathryn Marie, December 26, 
1973. / 9006 Maryland, Niles, 111. 60648. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mease '64, 
their first child, a son, Kert Robert, 
December 29, 1973. Ken is sports director 
for WPRI-TV. / 151 Taber Ave., 
Providence, R.I. 02906. 

To Timothy and Marilyn Holm Sullivan 
'67, their second son, Jeffrey Jonathan, 
January 15, 1974. / 52 Locust St., 
Bayport, N.Y. 11705. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Steven E. Dubs '70, 
their first child, a daughter, Kristin Marie, 



January 22, 1974. The couple was married 
in 1971. Father is chief of engineering at 
Thonet Industries in York. / 3000 
Norwood Place, York, Pa. 17404. 

To John C. '69 and Sara Landis Arthur 
'70, their second child, a son, John Charles 
Jr., January 31, 1974. Father is with the 
security service of the U.S. Air Force in 
Thailand for the current year. Sally and 
the children are living at 712 N. Eighth St., 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To John '68 and Theresa Esposilo Bzdil 
'74, their second child, a son, John III, 
February 1 1, 1974. John has recently been 
promoted to business manager II at Dan- 
ville State Hospital. / 520 N. Eighth St., 
Sunbury. Pa. 17801. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Joe Kleinbauer '63, 
their third daughter, Mary Margaret, 
March 3, 1974. Joe is owner-operator of J. 
Kleinbauer, Inc., Gentlemen's Fur- 
nishings, in Selinsgrove. / R.D. 1, 
Monroe Manor, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 




Dr Ralph C. Geigle '35, superintendent 
of Reading (Pa. I schools, made it two 
in one day when he received the Lycoming 
College alumni award, the college chair, 
on May 4. He graduated there in 1933 
when it was Dickinson Junior College. 



deaths 



William B. Rose x'69, Dover, N.H., 
August 19, 1973, in a freak collision with 
another player while chasing a flyball in 
the New Hampshire All-Star Softball 
Tournament. Bill had chosen writing as his 
career and was recognized as a new and 
promising author of two published books, 
with his first novel ready for publication. 
He purchased 60 acres of woodland in 
1970 and had planned to build and settle 
permanently in New Hampshire. 

Edgar A. Alexander '09, Waynesboro, 
Pa., November 26, 1973. A former school 
teacher, he was a mail carrier from 1919 
until retirement in 1954. He was a member 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church and 
taught Sunday school for a number of 
years. 

James E. Wert x'44, Philipsburg, Pa., 
December 1, 1973. A certified dental 
technician, he owned and operated his own 
dental laboratory in Sunbury, later went 
on to Binghamton, N.Y., and most recent- 
ly was with the Cleft Palate Clinic of 
Osceola Mills. His wife "Missy" was assis- 
tant editor of SUSQUEHANNA 
ALUMNUS in the late '50s. 

The Rev. Joseph E. Law '23, 
Williamsport, Pa., December 2, 1973. 
Beginning his studies after service in 
World War I, he also earned M.A. and 
B.D. degrees from Susquehanna. Pastor 
Law was a former member of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Directors and spent most of 



his years in the ministry at Redeemer 
Lutheran Church, Williamsport. 

Anna Moore Schellenberg '30 (Mrs. 
Harry F.), Windber, Pa., December 5, 
1973. A high school teacher, she was active 
in the American Legion Auxiliary, 
American Red Cross, and First Lutheran 
Church. 

Newton Kerstetter '13, Sunbury, Pa., 
December 7, 1973. Also holder of an M.A. 
from Susquehanna, he was a teacher and 
public school psychologist for many years, 
then taught Army and Marine classes dur- 
ing World War II, and for some 16 years 
was executive director of the Lower Sus- 
quehanna Branch, Pennsylvania Associa- 
tion of the Blind. He was active in his 
church and many local organizations. 

Isabelle Bolig Heckert '25 (Mrs. Mead 
W.), Sunbury, Pa., December 8, 1973. Her 
brother was the late Harold L. Bolig '25, 
former head coach in Selinsgrove. 

C. Robert Coyle '26, Camp Hill, Pa., 
December 13, 1973. A World War I 
veteran, he earned the M.A. from New 
York University. He was a supervising 
principal in Pennsylvania public schools 
for more than 37 years and retired at 
Lykens in 1953. 

Robert G. Snyder, Port Trevorton, Pa., 
December 30, 1973. He was a brother of 
George Snyder '52 and husband of the 
former Suzanne Johnston Heim, a lecturer 
in German at Susquehanna, 1962-70. 

Robert J. Lembach, Ramsey, N.J., 
January 1974. He was the husband of the 
former Ruth Roslander '52. 

Leslie C. Krebs, Shippensburg, Pa., 



SPRING 1974 



25 



January 8, 1974. His widow is the former 
Anna Kline '11, now living at Doylestown 
Manor, Maple Ave., and East St., 
Doylestown, Pa. 18901. 

Elmer J. Deveraux '35, Wilmington, 
Del., January 15, 1974. He retired in 1971 
after teaching for 33 years at Wilmington 
H.S. 

Dr. Sylvester K. Stevens hc'61, Camp 
Hill, Pa., January 16, 1974. One of Penn- 
sylvania's most celebrated historians, he 
was executive director of the State 
Historical and Museum Commission, 
author of ten books on Pennsylvania 
history, and a founder of American 
Heritage magazine. He earned bachelor's 
and master's degrees from Penn State and 
the Ph.D. from Columbia. 

Dr. Charles B. Foelsch, New York City, 
January 19, 1974. A graduate of Wartburg 
College and Chicago Lutheran Seminary, 
he was a nationally-admired parish pastor, 
author, and Pacific Lutheran Seminary 
president who taught public speaking at 
Susquehanna during his years as pastor of 
Zion Lutheran Church of Sunbury. 
Among his survivors is son Donald H. 
Foelsch '53. 

James S. Leitzel Jr. '48, McAlisterville, 
Pa., February 1, 1974. He was chief 



chemist for the Bureau of Materials 
Testing and Research for the State of 
Pennsylvania. An Air Force veteran of 
World War II, he was active in the Boy 
Scout organization and fraternal groups, 
and taught a church school class and served 
on council at Trinity Lutheran Church. 

Dr. Bryce E. Nicodemus '31, 
Lewistown, Pa., February 7, 1974. He 
earned his M.D. from Jefferson Medical 
College and served his internship at the 
Geisinger Medical Center in Danville. 
Practicing for some 32 years in Lewistown, 
he served as chief of staff at Lewistown 
Hospital and as president of the medical 
staff, and for several years was head of the 
hospital's pediatrics department. He was 
active professionally and in the communi- 
ty, at St. John's Lutheran Church, and as a 
member of Susquehanna's Advisory Coun- 
cil. His widow is the former Ruth Goff'iO 
and a brother is Elno C. .\icodemus x'29. 
The Rev. Robert G Sander '40, his pastor, 
officiated at funeral services. 

Anna Wagner Mumma, Harrisburg, 
Pa., February 17, 1974. She was the 
mother of Mabel Mumma McLain '24, 
wife of Dr. Joseph C. McLain '24. 

Dr. Frank M. Haislon '15, Pottstown, 
Pa. Holder of the Ph.D. from New York 



University, he was the retired superinten- 
dent of Pottstown schools. His widow is 
the former Margaret Morning '26. 

Euphemia Brown Kerns '14 (Mrs. G. 
Bruce), Lock Haven, Pa., March 28, 1973. 
She was a member of St. John Lutheran 
Church. 

Robert Clark McFall '16, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., March 6, 1974. A wholesale candy 
merchant and realtor for most of his life, 
he most recently assisted his son Robert R. 
McFall x'43 in operating the Hotel Gover- 
nor Snyder. He was a Mason, a member of 
Sharon Lutheran Church and the 
Dauntless Hook & Ladder Co. 

Katherine P. Reed '29, Sunbury, Pa., 
April 15, 1974. A retired teacher and 
supervisor of music in the Sunbury 
schools, she was one of Sunbury's leading 
citizens and civic activists, helping to 
found the community library and serving 
on the Board of the YMCA. the Salvation 
Army, and a number of other 
organizations. She was a past president of 
the Sunbury Community Hospital Aux- 
iliary and the Women's Auxiliary of Sus- 
quehanna University, and the holder of 
numerous honors including Susquehanna's 
1973 Alumni Award for Service. She was a 
lifelong member of Zion Lutheran Church. 




SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 1974 FOOTBALL 



Sept. 14 


GROVE CITY 




at Grove City, Pa. 


1 


30 


Sept. 21 


WESTMINSTER 


Kiwanis-Stagg Hat at Selinsgrove 


1 


30 


Sept. 28 


JUNIATA* 




at Huntingdon, Pa. 


1 


30 


Oct. 5 


GENEVA 


Homecoming 


at Selinsgrove 


1 


30 


Oct. 12 


ALBRIGHT* 




at Reading, Pa. 


7 


30 


Oct. 19 


DELAWARE VALLEY* Parents Day 


at Selinsgrove 


1 


30 


Oct. 26 


WILKES* 


Band Day 


at Selinsgrove 


1 


30 


Nov. 2 


LYCOMING* 




at Williamsport, Pa. 


1 


30 


Nov. 9 


WAYNESBURG 




at Waynesburg, Pa. 


1 


15 


Nov. 16 


UPSALA* 


Lutheran Youth Day at Selinsgrove 


1 


30 



'Middle Atlantic Conference Game 



'49 Class Boosts Fund 

An idea for your class? 

Jim Peters '49, chairman of the 25th 
reunion class, checked with the Alum- 
ni Office to see how the 129 active 
members of his class were responding 
to the University Fund this year. He 
then wrote special notes to those who 
had not yet contributed, suggesting 
$25 — one dollar for each year since 
graduation — as a starting amount. 

Result: he helped increase the class 
participation from 18 to 43 givers, a 
healthy 33 percent of potential. As of 
May 14, the Class of 1949 had 
produced $2770 for the Fund for an 
average of close to $65. 

Jim is a teacher-coach at Kutztown 
State College. 



Luncheon in Baltimore 

Alumni and friends of Susquehanna may 
join those of all 18 universities, colleges and 
junior colleges affiliated with the Lutheran 
Church in America at a luncheon event 
being held at noon on Tuesday, July 9, at 
the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore 
during the biennial LCA convention. 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Board OKs Gym 




II" 1 ii 



Campbell, Rea. Hayes & Large, architects of Alloona. Pa., have prepared this 

perspective of Susquehanna's Alumni Gym addition. Hassinger Hall is at 

left. Below is an east elevation, which would be the view from University Field. 



The Susquehanna University Board of Directors at its spring 
meeting on May 6 approved a $2.5 million proposal for ad- 
ditions and renovations to Alumni Gymnasium, but may 
decide to have the construction done in two stages. 

The total building project would add, to the east and 
north of the present structure, a new intercollegiate basket- 
ball court with seating for 2000 spectators, an Olympic-size 
swimming pool with seating capacity of 450, squash courts, 
offices, lobby, and team and shower rooms. The older 
building — which replaced a still-older gymnasium destroyed 
by fire in 1934 — would be renovated to create several 
classrooms, new locker rooms and basketball floor, a room 
for gymnastics, and a relocated wrestling room. 



The final plans and specifications will be reviewed by the 
Board in October and, in light of a report on priorities and 
financing, the directors will decide whether to build all at once 
or divide the work into two phases. While recognizing the 
need for the new facility and aware that several generations of 
students and alumni have been eager to proceed for some 
years, the Board is determined that the timing of construction 
should be based on a total evaluation of other needs and 
financial obligations. 

The University has never had a swimming pool and has 
played varsity basketball games at Selinsgrove High School 
for the past 1 5 years because there is virtually no seating space 
in the present gym. 




i 



-f 



BA-S.T SL-S-VATIOM 



SPRING 1974 



27 



SU Sports 



by PETE SILVESTRI 




Peter B Silvestri is SL's new 
director of public information. 
A graduate of Amherst and Trinity 
and a former social studies 
teacher, he was most recently 
Tolland County bureau chief 
/or The Hartford I Cl. I Times. 



Although the Lanthorn staff did not have Susquehanna's 
intercollegiate sports program in mind when it selected 
"beginnings" as the theme for the 1974 yearbook, that theme 
can be applied to Crusader athletics during the past year. 

With the exception of coach Neil Potter's soccer team 
which enjoyed its best season ever, 1973-74 sports squads did 
not make many marks in the Susquehanna record book. But 
all rosters were dominated by underclassmen and, hopefully, 
future successes will prove that what athletic director Jim 
Hazlett termed an "average" year record-wise was only the 
start of better things to come. 

Overall, Crusader teams won 48 percent of their contests 
during the year. The spring sports groups were slightly below 
that pace with a success rating of 44 percent. 

The spring saw only the golf team, coached by alumni 
director Buss Carr, achieve a winning season. Golf (8-4), 
baseball (9-14), track (4-5), men's tennis (5-7) and women's 
tennis (2-5) combined for a 28-35 spring. But there were only 
eight seniors involved in the entire spring sports program, and 
first-year men and women quickly became prominent per- 
formers at the "beginning" of their Susquehanna athletic 
careers. 

Perhaps the most impressive performance by a new- 
comer was the one turned in by Ginny Davis of Warminster, 
Pa., who took over the number-one singles spot on coach Ann 
Cooper's women's tennis team in her first year on campus, 
won three of her seven matches, and might have won two 
more had she not been ill late in the campaign. Another 
freshman, Jill Simpson of Washington, Pa., also had a 3-4 in- 
dividual record, the squad's best. Women's tennis loses one 
senior, Cheryl Bishop of Jamesville, N.Y. 

The golfers owed their success to team balance and con- 
sistency. Lacking any real par-breakers, the Susquehanna 
linksmen topped their opposition with a steady team per- 
formance that usually found five Crusaders right around the 
80 mark. 

In the MAC Tournament, the golfers bettered the 
previous tourney team-score record, but so did five other 
schools, and Susquehanna finished tied for fifth in the 19- 
team field. In the individual ranking, sophomore Steve 



Farrell of Bloomfield, Ct. finished tied for sixth with a 36- 
hole total of 151, five strokes behind the leader. 

Graduation claims only one golfer, Ivan Samuels of 
South Orange, N.J., who had the best season average with 
79.6. A freshman, Kevin Flanagan of Hamden, Ct., finished 
consistently in the top five for the Crusaders, as did juniors 
Bob Carr of Short Hills, N.J.; Bruce Dansbury of Yardley, 
Pa.; and Doug Holcombe of Somerville, N.J. 

The performance by the Crusader baseball team was 
probably the most disappointing aspect of spring sports 
because this squad, more than any other, could have done 
better. Throughout the season the Crusader nine got its share 
of hits and some strong pitching, but errors and poor base- 
running were costly. 

Especially exasperating to coach Hazlett were the twin 
losses to Bucknell in the season finale. The Bisons came into 
the date with only three wins and Susquehanna had had more 
success against all their common opponents. But, as Hazlett 
commented afterwards, "anything you can do wrong in 
baseball we did," including two balks with men on third base 
by the same pitcher in the same inning. 

At the spring sports banquet special baseball awards 
were presented to senior pitcher-outfielder Doug Brinkman 
of Glen Cove, N. Y.,best pitcher and highest offensive rating; 
junior catcher Joe Prekopa of McAdoo, Pa., best batting 
average (.364) and most improved; and freshman second 
baseman Brad Moore of Old Saybrook, Ct., best rookie. In 
his first season Moore was not only the top rookie, but was 
among the most dependable players on the team. He took 
over the starting job at second base early in the season, batted 
.305, and led the team in doubles with four. 

The baseball team suffers the most from graduation of 
the spring aggregations. Departing are Brinkman, Rich 
DiSanti of Cheswick, Pa., who Hazlett considers one of the 
best defensive first basemen he has ever seen on a college dia- 
mond, infielder Phil Popovec of Lutherville, Md., and out- 
fielders John McCrudden of Douglassville, Pa. and Dean 
Madison of Spring Grove, Pa. 

The track team, with no seniors and only four juniors on 
the roster of 25, did better than had been expected by interim 



28 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Princess of the Racquets Davis 

warms up on the courts, pitcher 

Brmkman sends one over the plate, 

and record-breaking javelin-thrower 

Levengood aims his spear 

for yet another target far away. 




coaches Charlie Klines and Bruce Wagenseller, who admit 
they are not track experts and who hope their track coaching 
careers ended in 1974, the same year they began. 

Special track awards went to junior hurdler and co- 
captain Bob Rattleman of Pittsburgh, most inspirational; 
sophomore distance runner Jeff Yoder of Mt. Carmel, Pa., 
most points; junior javelin thrower Glenn Levengood of 
Gilbertsville, Pa., most improved; and freshman middle dis- 
tance runner Bruce Koenecke of Westfield, N.J., best rookie. 

New school records were set during the season by Yoder 
in the mile (4:24.1) and Levengood in the javelin (224' 8"). 
Yoder took a fifth place in the mile in the MAC Tournament, 
and Levengood a second in the javelin with sophomore team- 
mate Chuck Yoder of Shamokin, Pa. taking third in the same 
event. Sophomore Craig Schaeffer of Westminster, Md. won 
third place in the MAC high jump and the Crusaders finished 
tied for eighth place among 17 teams. 

The tennis season also marks the beginning and the end 



of a coaching career. Music instructor Vic Rislow took over 
the coaching duties, but finds that his other commitments will 
not allow him to do so next year. The new tennis coach will 
find only one senior gone from the 1974 group — number-one 
singles man Bill McCard of Jenkintown, Pa. Top performers 
this year were junior Bob Danielson of Chatham, N.J. and 
sophomore Larry Hill of Brick Town, N.J., who had the best 
individual marks on the squad both in singles and as a doubles 
team. Also earning points were junior John Bird of 
Bloomsburg, Pa. (football quarterback come fall) and 
freshman Bob Wentz of Hadden Heights, N.J. 

Bill Atkinson, senior soccer co-captain from Chatham, 
N.J., received the Blair Heaton Memorial Award at the 
spring sports banquet. Atkinson had been an all-star goalie in 
high school, but switched positions for coach Potter and 
earned three letters as a halfback and inside lineman. Vice 
president of the senior class, he majored in business and plans 
a career in banking. 



SPRING 1974 



29 



























CRUSADER SCOREBOARD 
















WINTER 1973-74 










1 


/ARSITY BASKETBALL 










WRESTLING 




su 




Opp 




■I iH 




SU 




Opp 


68 


Wagner 


66 








32 


Scranton 


6 


54 


Juniata 


55 




pP^ 




14 


Juniata 


18 


91 


Messiah 


63 






17 


Bucknell 


29 


63 


Albright 


75 




R&^i 




30 


Albright 


9 


100 


Wilkes 


76 








36 


King's 


15 


68 


Scranton 


69 








15 


Lebanon Valley 


19 


76 


Davis & Elkins 


66 




JV BASKETBALL 




13 


Delaware Valley 


27 


68 


Cumberland 


78 


SU 




Opp 


7 


Elizabethtown 


35 


67 


St. Mary's 


69 


134 


Capitol, Penn State 


55 


5 


York 


44 


63 


Washington & Lee 


93 


65 


Juniata 


55 


6 


Gettysburg 


37 


67 


Albright 


57 


60 


Messiah 


67 




Won 3 Lost 7 




88 


Lycoming 


92 


103 


Albright 


67 








89 


York 


66 


79 


Wilkes 


74 


WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


73 


Lycoming 


74 


74 


Scranton 


102 








55 


Philadelphia Textile 


53 


78 


Albright 


88 


SU 




Opp 


91 


Lebanon Valley 


63 


77 


Lycoming 


61 


35 


Lebanon Valley 


43 


61 


Grove City 


62 


87 


York 


73 


13 


Albright 


35 


64 


Upsala 


59 


86 


Lycoming 


78 


14 


Shippensburg State 


43 


63 


Elizabethtown 


73 


57 


Bucknell 


80 


16 


Bloomsburg State 


56 


62 


Juniata 


50 


95 


Lebanon Valley 


65 


36 


Wilkes 


55 


60 


Wilkes 


79 


52 


Bucknell 


54 


17 


Elizabethtown 


60 


66 


Delaware Valley 


62 


68 


Elizabethtown 


58 


32 


Dickinson 


39 


52 


Lock Haven State 


48 


71 


Juniata 


73 


38 


Bucknell 


47 


81 


Westminster 


63 


76 


Lock Haven State 


47 




Won Lost 8 




71 


Cheyney State 
Won 13 Lost 12 

GOLF 


91 


96 


Intramural All Stars 
Won 11 Lost 6 

SPRING 1974 


57 




TRACK 




SU 




Opp 




BASEBALL 




SU 




Opp 


391 


Bloomsburg State 


437 


SU 




Opp 


102 


York 


/o 


429 


F&M 


416 


8 


Messiah 


1 


33 


Bloomsburg State 


112 


400 


Scranton 


387 


6 


York 


7 


45 


Dickinson 


100 


400 


Juniata 


402 


2 


York 


1 


89 


Lycoming 


55 


400 


Lycoming 


447 


2 


Juniata 


1 


59 


Juniata 


86 


422 


Dickinson 


425 


3 


Juniata 


11 


82 


Delaware Valley 


79 


385 


Western Maryland 


393 


6 


Scranton 


3 


82 


Albright 


20 


415 


Bucknell 


387 


3 


Scranton 


4 


47 


Gettysburg 


98 


405 


Elizabethtown 


398 


3 


Dickinson 


6 


28 


Bucknell 


108 


399 


Scranton 


405 


3 


Dickinson 


7 




Won 4 Lost 5 




399 


Wilkes 


436 


2 


Delaware Valley 


1 




TENNIS 




399 


Upsala 


474 


4 


Delaware Valley 


2 


SU 




Opp 




Won 8 Lost 4 







Elizabethtown 


6 





Elizabethtown 


9 








4 


Elizabethtown 


6 





Upsala 


9 








3 


Philadelphia Textile 


11 


7 


Juniata 


2 




WOMEN'S TENNIS 




6 


Philadelphia Textile 


5 


5 


Lycoming 


4 


SU 




Opp 


12 


Western Maryland 


3 


4 


Wilkes 


5 





Lock Haven State 


7 


1 


Western Maryland 


4 


1 


Dickinson 


8 


1 


Millersville State 


6 





Albright 


3 


5 


Scranton 


4 


2 


Dickinson 


4 


3 


Albright 


4 


4 


Albright 


5 


5 


Bloomsburg State 


4 


3 


Wilkes 


2 


8 


Kings 


1 





Elizabethtown 


7 





Wilkes 


3 


6 


Delaware Valley 


2 


1 


Bucknell 


5 


12 


Bucknell 


15 





Bloomsburg State 


9 


4 


Shippensburg State 
Won 2 Lost S 


3 


5 


Bucknell 
Won 9 Lost 14 


7 





Bucknell 
Won 5 Lost 7 


9 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



While traveling this summer . . . 

WHY NOT VISIT THE BEAUTIFUL SUSQUEHANNA CAMPUS 
IN ONE OF THE COUNTRY'S FINEST RIVER VALLEYS? 




Rentals are available 
in the 

3-year-old Minidorm 
June 24 - August 23, 1974 



Each unit (at $60 per week or $15 per night) includes four double bedrooms, lounge and bath. 
Kitchenette, washer and dryer in basement. Meals may be taken in the Campus Center 
cafeteria; Breakfast (7:30-8:30) $1.00, Lunch (11:45- 1:00) $1.40, Dinner (5:00-6:15) $2.10. 

Tennis courts, canoes, bikes, outdoor basketball available on campus; 
golf, swimming, fishing, hiking and picnicking in the immediate area. 



Please apply as early as possible to the Alumni Office. Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 (717) 374-2345 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OFFERS ALUMNI THE OPPORTUNITY 
TO PURCHASE GUARANTEED ISSUE TERM LIFE INSURANCE . . . 

... at low rates 

... to supplement your permanent insurance 

... to establish protection for your family 

YOU ARE GUARANTEED LIFE INSURANCE COVERAGE UPON APPLICATION . . . 

. . . you have waiver of premium benefits 
. . . you have conversion privileges 
. . . you have low cost 



General mailings announcing this plan are being made to all alumni from the Insurance Company of North America throughout the spring. 
Further information is also available from the Alumni Office. Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 



SPRING 1974 



31 




ATTENTION PARENTS 

If this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address at your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



The work of clearing and grading for the Selinsgrove bypass on the Isle of Que is going 
full steam ahead. This aerial photo, looking north, shows Routes II and 15 looping around 
at the left and the location of the new highway beginning to take shape through the center. 
The University campus and Chapel Auditorium are barely visible in the upper left corner. 



The Susquehanna Rlumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undeliverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



OtBKA 
119 1/2 

SUNBUKY 

PA 



OOtBLtR 
CHUrtCH 



STR£E T 
17001 



Susqueha 
lumms 






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Testing the Environment 



C.F. Walker Lake in western Snyder County is 
the site this summer of a research project of 
Susquehanna's Federally-funded Institute For 
Environmental Studies, which is examining the 
physical, chemical and biological characteristics 
of the area. The field team, upper left, includes 
Steve Piatt '75 of Haddonfield, S.J.. Institute 
director Dr. Frank W. Fletcher, and Scott 
Wissinger '76 of Hollidaysburg, Pa. They are 
shown collecting various samples of water and 
marine life and making initial tests aboard their 
floating laboratory. Back at home base in the 
University's Science Hall, more extensive analyst 
is conducted by Bruce Downs '74 of .Xorth Caldv, 
N.J. and Debra Maurer '75 of Ashland. Pa. 



On our cover This summer's cover illustra- 
tion appears at first glance to be just another 
three happy fishermen enjoying the warm 
weather. Not so. The subjects are carrying out 
some serious work for Susquehanna's Institute 
For Environmental Studies and additional 
photo coverage is found on the opposite page. 
The boat, by the way, is the latest addition to 
the Susquehanna "fleet." The University also 
Dwns a number of canoes which are used in the 
physical education program. 

Inside, we present two timely articles — one 
:oncerning an urban studies program recently 
atablished in Baltimore, and the other a 
'limpse of the Sinai Peninsula. Our next big 
ssue, to appear in October, will feature the an- 
lual President's Report for 1973-74. Don't 
niss it. — editor 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



Susquehanna University 
Alumni association 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 43 



SUMMER 1974 



No. 4 



CONTENTS 



Testing the Environment INSIDE FRONT COVER 

Experiential Learning in Baltimore 4 

by Peter Silvestri 

Travels in God's Wilderness io 

by Otto Reimherr 

Susquehannans On Parade 12 

Fall Sports Schedules 15 

"I Do" 16 

Born Crusaders 17 

Deaths 17 

SU Sports 18 

by Pete Silvestri 



iflorge H. Bantley '41, president; William C. Davenport 
13, Robert Hackenberg "56. vice presidents; Signe S. 
lates 71. secretary; Chester G. Rowe '52, treasurer: 
ouglas E Arthur '49. Henry J. Kell '39. Edward S. 
ogers Jr. '42, Samuel D. Ross Jr. '54, representatives on 
ie University Board of Directors; Simon B. Rhoads '30, 
otiis F. Santangelo '50. representatives on the University 
Intercollegiate Athletic Committee. 

xecutive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1975: 
avler Abbott '35, Jane Southwlck Mathias '49. Peter M. 
unn '57, Sharon Fetteroll Vak '68. John P. Yanuklis '60. 
brm expiring 1976: Samuel D. Clapper '68, James 
ormley '55. Lester C. Heilman '52. Franklin G. Smith '55. 
erm expiring 1977: Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan '62, 
Iwood M. McAllister '49, Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69. 
Neil R. Smith '63, James W. White '58. 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 1 7870, under the Act of August 24, 1 9 1 2. Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SUMMER 1974 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 




IN BALTIMORE 



by PETER SILVESTRI 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



This past spring six Susquehanna students from 
suburban New Jersey and rural outposts like Upper 
Black Eddy, Pa. spent 10 weeks living, working and 
studying urban affairs in Baltimore, the seventh largest 
city in the United States with a population of about 
900,000. 

For someone accustomed to life in an inner city it 
would have been educational. For students unfamiliar 
with the complexities of urban life it was a revelation 
that the six agreed was the most valuable part of their 
college experience. 

The six students were the first to take part in the 
new program, inaugurated last year under the label 
Baltimore Urban Term. In its first year the program 
was deemed a great success by all involved — students, 
administration, faculty and the cooperating staff of the 
Southwest Tutorial and Enrichment Program (STEP) 
of Baltimore, an interdenominational social service 
group which arranged student housing and internships 
and led the seminars in the city. 

The Baltimore Urban Term is one of several off- 
campus "experiential learning" opportunities offered 
at Susquehanna. Last year 10 percent of the student 
body was involved in one of these programs, which in- 
clude internships with area firms in accounting, 
business administration and computer science, psy- 
chology and sociology practicums at the Selinsgrove 
State School, and student teaching in area schools. A 
unique rural studies internship program in cooperation 
with several other institutions in the region is in the 
planning stages and scheduled to begin next summer. 

Susquehanna is committed to the role of experien- 
tial learning in the curriculum for two basic reasons. 
There is a realization that complex social, educational 
or business problems are often best studied firsthand 
from within, and that methods of dealing with them are 
best learned by doing. In addition there is the aspect of 
vocational preparation. A student with definite career 
goals can get valuable training through an internship, 
while one who is undecided on a future vocation can get 
a taste of the working world that may help him choose. 

To ensure, however, that these programs are not 
merely "escapes" from the classroom, a solid link with 
theoretical and academic learning is provided. This is 
particularly true of the Baltimore Urban Term, which 
Registrar John Moore views as a "prototype" for ex- 



periential learning programs at the University. The 
students are involved in course work in related 
academic fields before, during and after the internship. 

During the first term of the University's 3-3 calen- 
dar students have an opportunity to meet members of 
the Baltimore Urban faculty, including the staff of 
STEP who visit the campus, to discuss the course and 
internships. I nterested students also have an opportuni- 
ty to visit Baltimore before deciding whether to apply 
for the program. 

During Term II students accepted into the 
program, mostly juniors, must take a seminar course, 
led by Assistant Professor of Religion Boyd Gibson, 
which offers an interdisciplinary study of urban affairs 
in general and Baltimore and its Southwest section in 
particular. The students are expected at this time to 
select an internship assignment and a related research 
topic for the in-Baltimore phase of the program. 

The students spend all of Term III in Baltimore, 
receiving two course credits for their internship and one 
course credit for the seminar sessions, with grades 
given by the STEP staff. The internships involve be- 
tween 20 and 30 hours of work per week. The seminar 
meets twice a week and offers visiting speakers from 
public and private social service agencies in Baltimore, 
as well as experiences such as a "ride-along" with a 
police officer, which last year's students found to be 
the most interesting of the seminar sessions. In addi- 
tion to brief daily reports on their experiences in Balti- 
more, the students prepare a lengthy research paper as 
part of the seminar work. The students also find time 
to take advantage of some of the cultural and recrea- 
tional opportunities of Baltimore. 

Another urban study and internship program, The 
Harrisburg Urban Semester (THUS), has been 
available to Susquehanna students for several years 
through a consortium of which the University is not a 
member. The administration and faculty here decided 
to organize the Baltimore program for several reasons. 
Enrollment in TH US was limited and the THUS calen- 
dar did not coincide with Susquehanna's three terms. 
Also, the new program gives the University more con- 
trol over the academic component, and provides a 
larger, more diverse and comprehensive urban affairs 
laboratory than does Harrisburg, a city less than one- 
tenth the size of Baltimore. 



SUMMER 1974 



On the streets of Baltimore are 

Susquehannans Sue Edgren '77, Janet 

Frock '75, Jay Faron '74, Harold 

Letter '75. Lena Zehner '75. and 

Donna Guhn '75. Below, back to camera, 

Registrar Moore chats with the students 

in front of 1409 West Lombard. 

next to Union Square Methodist Church 




In fact, the mere exposure to day-to-day life in 
Baltimore can be the most significant aspect of the 
program from the students' point of view, leaving im- 
pressions and a perspective that remain throughout 
their college years and later lives. Statistics and written 
analysis of the sociology of the city are useful to the ex- 
pert but can be meaningless to someone who has never 
experienced the facts and figures "in the flesh." 

To quote from the University's brochure on the 
Baltimore program, "Few aspects of contemporary 
Western Civilization are as striking as the growth of the 
modern city. It is at once the great promise and the 
despair of technological society. In it are housed the 
best and the worst of our world — great museums are 
surrounded by slums, symphony orchestras compete 
with the noise pollution of jet airports, the most tal- 
ented of our industrial, social and political leadership 
vie with the shame of unethical practices and the cor- 
ruption of organized crime." 

During their 10 weeks in Baltimore the students 
must become part of the mass of humanity that pop- 
ulates the city, must jostle with the crowds and suffer 
through the traffic jams, breathe polluted air, and live 
in a world of concrete, steel and glass. Baltimore con- 
tains seemingly endless blocks of row houses, all 
similar on the outside, yet inhabited by many different 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ethnic and racial groups in clearly defined neighbor- 
hoods. In addition to coping with physical surroundings 
that are far from the green trees and lawns to which 
they are accustomed, the students come in contact 
with cultures and social mores quite different from 
their own white middle class backgrounds. Most of the 
students meet poor blacks for the first time through the 
Baltimore Urban Term. In the words of one of last 
year's group, "the tension and fast pace" of city life was 
a new experience. 

Another key facet of the 10 weeks for the students 
is the experience of living together as a group and 
becoming a part of the neighborhood community. 
Housing was provided in the former home of the Rev. 
Stanley F. Knock Jr., a member of the STEP staff. The 
house at 1409 West Lombard St. is right next to the 
Union Square Methodist Church, where the students 
became welcome visitors and organized a youth choir. 
Learning to "live, buy food and get along in the city as a 
group of six students" is valuable, notes Professor Gib- 
son. They must "share a concern for one another that is 



a necessary part of learning to live in a city," he says. 
The students noted that much of their learning came 
from "sharing each other's experiences." Gibson sees 
the "students' ability to relate to the community" as 
one of the main successes of the program. The students 
were not the only people to benefit from this. For the 
congregation of Union Square Methodist, mostly 
elderly people, to see a youth choir organized in their 
midst was an "unbelievably beautiful experience" for 
them, according to the Rev. Marvin "Tony" Boyles, 
another STEP staffer. 

The central aspect of the program, however, is the 
internship in which the students really get "where the 
action is." In addition to work experience and close ex- 
posure to urban problems, the internships provide the 
students access to data and professional people who 
serve as resources for their research papers. 

Psychology major Harold Leiter of Lewistown, 
Pa. was an intern with the Baltimore Area Council of 
Boy Scouts of America. His research paper entitled 
"Inner-City Boys Becoming In Tune with Scouting" 




pVflfS* ** 








c^. 



dealt with efforts by the Boy Scout organization to 
make its programs more relevant to youth in the city. 
He found that urban scouting does not involve the 
traditional woodland hiking and combatting snake 
bite, but learning how to read subway maps and cope 
with rat bites and lead poisoning. 

Community Action Agency 24 provided in- 
ternships for two students, Jay Faron of Summit, N.J., 
a religion major, and Donna Guhn of Mt. Holly, N.J., 
majoring in sociology. They worked in a neighborhood 
trying to revive itself after deteriorating because of 
damage during the riots of 1968, the exodus of that seg- 
ment of the population that could afford to move, and 
the removal of a large residential section to make room 
for a highway. Miss Guhn studied relocation, and saw 
its usually demoralizing effects on those forced to leave 
their homes, while Faron, who studied overall changes 
in the community, saw its effects on those who 
remained, in the form of a loss of business for already 
hard-pressed local commercial establishments. 

The health of community business, they learned, is 
crucial to the health of the neighborhood. Riot damage 
to stores and competition from new suburban shopping 
centers caused many neighborhood shops to close. This 
leaves the poor, who cannot afford transportation to 
the outlying shopping centers, at the mercy of 
monopolistic practices by the few remaining neighbor- 
hood merchants. To combat this problem the com- 
munity is trying to refurbish and reopen the large Hol- 
lins Market, which a few years ago was quarters for 
several grocers and a center of community life on 
market days. The interns saw that the best way to ac- 
complish a project like this is often through the 
organization and efforts of the community residents 
themselves, rather than reliance on outside assistance. 
"People must be made aware that there are ways to get 
things done and that their involvement can make a 
difference," says Faron in his research paper. 

Lena Zehner, a political science major from 
Nescopeck, Pa., was an intern with the Program for the 
Elderly of the Baltimore Legal Aid Bureau. She had 
firsthand contact with the elderly, a group which is not 
always immediately associated with the poverty 
problem but which, quoting from her paper, "is the 
only identifiable group in the poverty designation 
whose numbers in the past few years have grown rather 
than decreased." She specifically studied the 
Supplemental Security Income program which she 
found can be a boon to some, but a nightmare to others 
who fail to receive their checks because of bureaucratic 
or computer foul-ups. She also learned that a hopeless 
feeling of being ignored and forgotten is one 
characteristic of the aged, when several of the elderly 
people asked her "Why does a young person like you 



care about the problems of the aged?" Her answer was, 
in part, "we're all going to be old someday." 

Janet Frock, a psychology major from Upper 
Black Eddy, Pa., and Sue Edgren, a sociology major 
from Mendham, N.J., both were interns with guidance 
offices in the city public school system, and came away 
with the most negative impressions of the six students. 
They talked with teachers, gave screening tests to 
diagnose reading problems, and conducted interviews 
with and examined the records of students with 
behavioral problems. Their reports read like a catalog 
of the much-publicized problems of inner-city schools: 
high school students who can't read; classes too large 
for teachers to give individual attention to the students; 
students from crowded home situations that allow 
them no privacy for study; students who become dis- 
cipline problems because of their frustration at being 
unable to keep up academically; students with learning 
disabilities and emotional problems going undetected 
while guidance counselors are forced to spend most of 
their time filling out student schedule forms and course 
change requests; white teachers with racist attitudes 
who have no respect for their black students and thus 
get no respect in return; low morale among the staff 
caused by disagreement over the issue of a teacher 
strike. The only hope for improvement the pair could 
find was more funds and better teachers. In the mean- 
time, wrote Miss Edgren, "the school is doing more 
harm than good to its students." 

While the students' reactions to the Baltimore Ur- 
ban Term itself were unanimously positive, there was 
some disillusionment with the seeming inability of 
academia and society in general to make a real dent in 
the problems of the inner city. "There are so many 
problems you can't deal with them all," said one stu- 
dent. Another commented that "problems are more 
severe and more common than I realized," and ex- 
pressed some doubt that the return to the campus and 
course work next semester would produce any key to 
solutions. 

This kind of student reaction does not come as a 
surprise to the University and STEP staff, however. 
"Scholars haven't been able to solve the problems by 
study," admits Gibson, who hopes the Baltimore ex- 
perience will demonstrate to students that an involve- 
ment in the search for answers "has to be seen as a long- 
range commitment." 

Boyles says that disillusionment is common 
among professional social service people. "The helping 
professions aren't helping because the professionals 
come in with improper attitudes," he observes. "It 
takes a year for a new person to learn the ropes in an 
agency, then they get frustrated and get promoted or 
leave." This develops into a cycle, he explains, in which 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




the city becomes a training ground for professionals 
who move on to other jobs. This is the main reason that 
STEP has become involved in the Baltimore Urban 
Term, Boyles notes. "We hope to short circuit the dis- 
illusionment — give students a chance to taste it ahead 
of time," he says. "The students encounter a cultural- 
psychological setting totally different from what they 
expected. They see that much of the problem is caused 
by the professionals, and learn the lesson that T might 
be part of the problem.' " 

So the University and STEP do not expect, or even 
desire, that every student who takes the Baltimore Ur- 
ban Term will make a career of urban affairs. If a stu- 
dent realizes that he is psychologically unprepared or 
insufficiently dedicated to tackle inner city problems, 
that too is a constructive outcome. However, it is hoped 
that all the students will learn that society's problems 
are "not something to turn your back on," says Gibson. 
It is important "to acquaint one segment of society 
with the 'other America,' " in his words. "An un- 
derstanding of the inner-city should be shared by all," 
he says, not just professionals who work there. 

The staffs of the University and STEP, as well as 
the students themselves, believe that there was a 
tremendous amount of personal growth experienced by 
all the students involved. "They developed competen- 



cies and a feeling of adulthood," according to Gibson. 
"I saw what life is like and grew to rely more on my own 
judgment," said one student. 

The Susquehanna staff hopes for a feedback effect 
in which the rest of the campus will benefit from the 
growth of these students when they return to 
Selinsgrove next term. Moore says they should "bring 
back insights which will stimulate fellow students and 
instructors." College students sometimes tend to be 
"passive learners," Moore notes, but "hopefully the 
Baltimore experience creates self-starters." If not 
carried too far, some disenchantment with the campus 
on the part of the returning Baltimore group can be 
beneficial, Gibson believes. "They shouldn't go too far 
and totally reject theory and the learning of the past," 
he says, "but some questioning of the meaningfulness 
of academic material is a good thing." As one of last 
year's interns commented, "it may put pressure on the 
faculty to further challenge the students." 

A contribution to the program has already been 
made by the six students who took part in its premiere. 
The curriculum for the preparatory on-campus 
seminar next year will include additional material 
specifically on Baltimore, as the students suggested. 
The number of students involved will increase next 
year, with 10 already registered. 



SUMMER 1974 



Travels in God's Wilderness 



by OTTO REIMHERR 



Dr Reimherr is professor of philosophy 
and religion at Susquehanna and head of the 
Department. On sabbatical leave last spring, 
he spent a month taking part in the program 
of the Albright Institute. Saladin Street. 
East Jerusalem. This is his brief report. 



Equipped with knapsacks, sleeping bags, and 
canteens, we were ready to start from East Jerusalem at 
4:30 a.m. for the long journey down and around the 
Sinai Peninsula, that land bridge and battlefield 
between Africa and Asia. The purpose of our trip was 
to survey (subject to military restriction) about 60 of 
the possible 650 ancient sites on that peninsula. Our 
party of 30 had been organized by the Albright 
Institute, the Jerusalem center for the American 
Schools of Oriental Research. While we were mainly 
students and teachers, our group was augmented by 
others of varied backgrounds. Two outstanding Pales- 
tinian women, another outstanding Israeli woman 
from Haifa, a member of the American consular staff 
in Jerusalem, two members of the staff of the Brethren 
Service Committee, as well as two American teenagers 
all made their contribution to our life together. 
Organizer of the party was the able young archae- 
ologist, Austin Ritterspach, 1973-1974 Fellow at 
Albright and currently teaching at Elizabethtown 
College. The instructor and guide was Ora Lipshitz of 
Hebrew University, Jerusalem — enthusiast, student, 
and constant visitor of the Sinai. Although a woman, 
she had been an adviser to the Israeli armed forces as 
they fought their way across the peninsula. 

We climbed into our two opensided Land Rovers 
which had been packed with food and water for a six- 
day stay in the desert. We made our descent from the 
heights of Jerusalem with the cold morning air beating 
on our faces. Our direction was first to the east to the 
region of the Dead Sea, and then south following the 
shore line and the mountains alongside. 

Skirting the mountains along the road — moun- 
tains that almost come down to the shore of the Dead 
Sea — we worked our way south after several hours to 
the region of the Arabah, with our first stop Timna, 30 
kms. north of the port of Elat. Timna Valley for almost 
6000 years has been a source of copper, exploited in an- 
cient days by the Egyptians and the Romans and now 
being developed again by the Israelis. This area has 



mistakenly been thought to be the region of King 
Solomon's mines. Actually it was an Egyptian center, 
which is evident in a striking fashion when one ex- 
amines a corner of the valley where there are remains of 
a temple dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Hathor. 

Our first two days consisted mainly of travel down 
the east coast of Sinai, seeing Jordan and Saudi-Arabia 
across the magnificent blue water of the Gulf of Aqaba, 
and moving down and around to the shores of the Red 
Sea. Resorts are being developed by the Israeli on this 
picturesque coast at Nuweibah and Sharm el Sheikh, 
the latter a key spot in the 1967 war when Nasser 
threatened a blockade of the Strait of Tiran. At Sharm 
el Sheikh we paused for a swim and permission from 
the military to thread our way through the mine fields 
to begin our travel up the west coast of Sinai, where we 
could see the land of Egypt to the west, along the shores 
of the Gulf of Suez. 

Our days normally began at 4:30 a.m. and were 
filled with mile after mile of travel under the hot sun 
through the wadis, which are soft sandy valleys between 
the mountains — dry through months and years but 
during rainstorms, beds for surging streams and violent 
watercourses. Our nights were spent sleeping on the 
ground under the clear, star-filled sky, resting on the 
sands of the softest wadis we could find. Only the de- 
scent of darkness ended our trip through sun-filled days 
when we sipped water constantly to prevent dehydra- 
tion in the dry desert air. 

When we began our drive north we entered first the 
ghost town of Tor, once the largest settlement in 
southern Sinai, once inhabited by fishermen and once a 
quarantine station for Moslem pilgrims heading west 
from Mecca, probably bringing with them the germs of 
dread cholera picked up from the infected wells of the 
holy city. After passing the flaming torches of the oil 
fields of Abu Rodeis, at Abu Zuneima, slightly to the 
north, we began our way to the east whereby we would 
cross the southern third of the peninsula. 

Not too many miles from the shore is the 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



remarkable mountain site of Serabit el-Khadem. We 
made our ascent to the top of the mountain in the heat 
of the day. This was the most exhausting climb of the 
trip. The mountain top is striking for three reasons: for 
the remains of an Egyptian temple of 1 800 B.C. still in- 
scribed in praise of the Egyptian kings and the goddess 
Hathor; for the remains of the turquoise mines which 
had been worked by the Egyptians, now forgotten 
because of the poor quality of the turquoise; and finally, 
inside the mine caves are fascinating inscriptions, 
remains of writing of Asiatic people who were probably 
slave laborers for the Egyptians in the mines. On these 
walls are to be seen the proto-Sinaitic inscriptions, the 
first evidences of a true alphabet, progenitor of the 
Hebrew, Phoenician, Greek, Latin, and English 
alphabets. 

Working our way south for the next day we roved 
through the wadis toward the great oasis of southern 
Sinai at Feiran, the most settled area of the entire 
region because of the availability of water. Along the 
way we had glimpses of Bedouin life. Black garbed 
women were drawing water at the wells or staying close 
to huts and tents. Men roamed around on foot or on 
camel to evaluate the area for the safety of their 
women. Again and again one would see Bedouin 
possessions stuck in trees, a place of safekeeping ac- 
cording to Bedouin law. New roads and the profits 
from smuggling are changing the character of Bedouin 
life. Landmark for devotion is the whitewashed square 
chamber with a domed roof, the resting place for the 
deceased desert sheik, the most sacred of these for 
Sheik el Nebi Salech. 

Focus for everyone who travels in southern Sinai is 
the Mount of God, Jebel Musa, where according to 
tradition Moses is believed to have received the revela- 
tion of God. Near to the mountain, part of a range, one 
sees the magnificently wide valley of el-Raha, two miles 
long and two-thirds of a mile wide, where it is believed 
the children of Israel encamped while Moses went to 
the mount. We started at 2:30 a.m. to climb to the top 



of Jebel Musa, some 7500 feet in the air, to be there at 
dawn when we could see the majestic early mountain 
glow of sunrise playing on the reddish rocks of the 
mountain range. 

We made our descent, past the chapel of Elijah, 
who also made his trip to that holy mount, to the foot of 
the range where lies the famed monastery of St. 
Catherine, known for its art treasures and library and 
from whose collection the Sinaiticus manuscript of the 
Bible was stolen in 1859. The manuscript now reposes 
in the British Museum in London. Princeton Universi- 
ty has published the definitive volume describing the 
riches of this place. Stone upon stone in the very for- 
tress wall of the monastery, as well as the building in- 
side, recount the story of changes and movements in 
civilization since the days when Constantine sent slaves 
to the region to protect the monks who were huddled in 
prayer in the caves of the region. 

As we threaded our way toward the east again, 
fascinating scenes did not cease. In wadi after wadi, in- 
scribed on the rocks are the graffiti of travelers who 
through the centuries have gone that way. While a 
Sharira pass has served armies including that of Israel 
in the fight against Egypt in 1967, merchants and 
pilgrims have passed back and forth from east to west 
and returned leaving their messages scrawled on the 
rocks. 

Beno Rothenberg of Hebrew University in 
Jerusalem, a writer on Sinai, has well named this area: 
"God's Wilderness." Even a quick trip of a week 
through the sandy desert of Sinai recalls to mind the 
struggles of our spiritual ancestors, the children of 
Israel, who were said to have spent 40 years in this 
waste land. But for the present and for the future, let us 
hope that Sinai together with the rest of the Middle 
East will see the fulfillment ofthe prayer of aNabatean 
traveler who cut his words in the rock sometime in the 
last century B.C. or in the first century A.D., when he 
wrote: "Peace, Peace, Peace, Peace." 



SUMMER 1974 



11 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'12 

Alice Musselman resigned as state 
director for Nebraska of the National 
Retired Teachers Association last 

November. 

'24 

Dr. Claude A. Buss is on assignment to 
Europe and Southeast Asia for the 
summer. He will be back in the fall for his 
classes in the School of Social Sciences at 
San Jose State University. 

'27 

Jacob L. Brake, retired teacher who now 
makes his home on a farm, is in the 
Veterans Hospital in Martinsburg, W.Va., 
receiving therapy treatments after a stroke 
last fall. 

'29 

They said "Thanks, Doc" to Dr. William 
H Dreibelbis II of Snow Shoe, Pa. on May 
29 at a dinner and entertainment held in 
Our Lady of the Snows Skating Rink. Bill, 
a graduate of Hahnemann Medical 
College, began his general practice in Snow 
Shoe in 1935 when he took over the home 
and practice of the late Dr. Robert J. 
Young '26. Except for U.S. Army Medical 
Corps service in the Pacific during World 
War II, he has practiced there ever since. 
Called to particular attention as he and his 
wife look forward to retirement is Bill's 
leadership in establishing the Mountaintop 
Area Medical Center, which opened in 
February 1972. 

'30 

Wellington P Hartman is president of 
the Retired Service Officers Association 
and of the Florida State County Veteran 
Service Officers, both of Broward County. 
He lives at 2424 N.E. 6th Ave., Wilton 
Manor, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33305. 

Dr. Luke H. Rhoads of Hollidaysburg, 
Pa., executive director of Allegheny 
Lutheran Homes and Lutheran Social 
Services-Allegheny Region, was named 
"Citizen of the Year" by the West Central 
Chapter, National Association of Social 
Workers. 

'33 

Martha A. Fisher earned her psycholo- 
gist license in Pennsylvania and has 
received merit pins for volunteer work at 



the Sunbury Community Hospital. She 
lives in Hummels Wharf, Pa. 

'34 

P. Richard Fisher, elected to Susque- 
hanna's Sports Hall of Fame in 1971, 
retired this year as acting superintendent of 
Milton (Pa.) area schools after four decades 
as a math and science teacher, coach, and 
administrator in Milton. He was the subject 
of a feature in The Milton Standard which 
recounted his career at Selinsgrove H.S. 
and Susquehanna, his football and basket- 
ball coaching achievements at Milton, ser- 
vice as a Navy officer during World War II, 
and views of secondary education today 
contrasted with 1934. 

'35 

Dr. Charles G. Jones performed heart 
surgery in Truk (in the East Carolines of the 
Pacific) on a young man who was stabbed in 
the chest. "The doctors in the U.S. 
wouldn't believe this," said Charlie, who 



noted that not one of his assistants had a 
degree. The victim is now back at work. 

Dr. Ralph C. Geigle. now retired as 
superintendent of schools in Reading, Pa., 
was honored by the Philadelphia Phillies on 
July 7 with a "Ralph C. Geigle Day." 
Ralph, a former Crusader baseball player, 
threw out the first ball for the Phillies-San 
Diego game in Veterans Stadium. 

'36 

Mary London Russell, associate pro- 
fessor of music at Lycoming College, was 
awarded the prestigious Keystone Salute 
for outstanding civic leadership by the 
Pennsylvania Federation of Music Clubs. 
A year ago she was given the Outstanding 
Alumnus award of Lycoming, from which 
she graduated when it was Dickinson 
Junior College. 

James B Finn, former Union County 
(Pa.) school superintendent and most 
recently assistant executive director of the 
Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, 




Col. John W. Oberdorf '34, at right, hadn't been on campus since 1948. but he 
appeared on May 25 driving his boss. Sen. Mark O. Hatfield, up from Washington to 
deliver the Commencement address. John has been Hatfield's field representative in 
his home slate of Oregon since his retirement from the L'.S. Air Force seven years ago. 
A much-decorated flyer during World War II. he later was chief of staff of the 18th 
Air Force and then a teacher of air science and commandant of the ROTC at L CLA. With 
the Senator and John is his sister Ella Oberdorf Wilson x'34, widow of the late Dr. 
Arthur H Wilson, longtime SU professor of English, who now makes her home with her 
son-in-law and daughter. William A. '64 and Anne Wilson Andel '61 , Sicklerville. NJ. 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



retired after 37 years of service to educa- 
tion. 

'40 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel conducted 
the funeral of Duke Ellington in New 
York's Cathedral of St. John the Divine on 
May 27. Some 10,000 mourners jammed 
the Cathedral to pay tribute to the 
musician-composer and master of the jazz 
idiom. On the staff of St. Peter's Lutheran 
Church in Manhattan and well known as 
pastor to the jazz community, John spent 
the Duke's last four hours at his hospital 
bedside. 

James Pearce. principal of East High 
Street Elementary School, Elizabethtown, 
Pa., received the American Citation from 
Conewago Post 329 of the American 
Legion. 

'43 

Pierce A. Coryell. Selinsgrove attorney, 
has resigned after 22 years as solicitor for 
the Borough of Selinsgrove. He continues 
in private practice at his residence-office, 
the historic Governor Simon Snyder home 
on Market Street. 

'46 

Janet Rohrbach Robinson was the 
adjudicator for 60 pianists auditioning for 
the National Guild of Piano Teachers in 
Douglas, Ga. during April. 

'47 

Donald R Bashore. associate professor 
of psychology at Bloomsburg State College 
and pastor of Emmanuel's Reformed 
Church, Mainville, Pa., will be included in 
the next edition of "Who's Who in the 
East." His address is R.D. 3, Bloomsburg, 
Pa. 17815. 

'48 

Harriet Gould Merlz. educational media 
specialist at South Miami (Fla.) Sr. H.S., 
spent six weeks in Japan this summer par- 
ticipating in the 1974 American Educators 
in Japan Summer Program. She was the 
recipient of a Japan Foundation grant. 

'49 

Charles A. Morris is the new sales 
manager for the Eastern Region for 
Burroughs Corp. He and his family have 
moved to Detroit. 

'50 

Mildred Leeser Fasold. supervisor of 
guidance services at Shikellamy H.S., was 
awarded a General Electric Foundation 
Guidance Fellowship grant to attend a six- 



week guidance training program at Boston 
University. 

'51 

The Rev. Waller Brandau, pastor of 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Milton, Pa., led 
in a joyous rededication of the church 
edifice in June. It had been heavily 
damaged during the 1972 flood and was 
refurbished at a cost of $300,000. First vice 
president of Trinity's council is Frank Beat- 
ty '61 , organist is Grover Foehlinger '73. 
and Charlotte Neuman Martz x'54 chaired 
the rededication committee. 

'52 

William Nale is now vice president and 
controller of Standard Steel, a leading 
maker of specialty forgings located in 
Burnham, Pa. 

Dr. Waldemar Zagars h retired as 
professor of economics at Gettysburg 
College in May. A native of Latvia, he 
taught at Susquehanna for 10 years before 
joining the Gettysburg faculty in 1956. 

'53 

William C. Davenport is now owner of 
the Hoopy Insurance Agency, Lemoyne, 
Pa. He was associated with Aetna Casualty 
& Surety Co. for 19 years. Bill and his wife, 
the former Margaret Henderson '60. and 
their three children live in Camp Hill, Pa. 

'54 

James" Mike" Rising, former director of 
the physical plant at Susquehanna, is now 
supervisor of construction for Weis 
Markets Inc., Sunbury. Mike is also the 
new chairman of the Snyder County 
Democratic Committee. 

'55 

The Rev. Charles W. Coales is associate 
director, community services to the aging, 
for Tressler-Lutheran Service Associates. 
His duties include consultation, counseling 
and community organization primarily 
with Lutheran pastors and congregations. 

Dr. Malcolm E. Musser he. former 
basketball coach and dean of men at 
Bucknell University, was inducted into the 
Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame. He was 
also honored at a dinner by surviving 
members of Lewisburg High School's 1919 
football team, which Mai coached to an un- 
defeated season. 

'56 

Gordon C. Boop. senior vice president 
and trust officer of the Bloomsburg Bank- 
Columbia Trust Co., was elected chairman 
of the Pennsylvania Bankers Association 
Trust Department administrative com- 




Nale '53 and Hadfield '68 



mittee at the association's annual conven- 
tion in Atlantic City. 

'57 

Maj. Gerald W. Musselman is serving as 
a communications-electronics program 
manager at Headquarters, Air Force Com- 
munications Service, Richards-Gebaur 
AFB, Mo. Prior to returning to the United 
States from Germany, Gerry and his family 
spent two weeks touring through Kenya 
and Tanzania, East Africa, on a 
photographic safari. Current address is 
12735 Sycamore, Grandview, Mo. 64030. 

'59 

Mary Davis Heisey wrote an article, 
"Thank You for Coming," which was 
published on the editorial page of the June 
1974 issue of Decision. The article concerns 
an experience she and her husband had 
while vacationing in England last summer. 



'60 



Harry Powers is vice principal in charge 
of student and personnel services at New 
Providence H.S. in New Jersey. He was 
previously coordinator of pupil personnel 
services in Chatham. 

'61 

Dr. Richard E. Derrick has opened a new 
office for the general practice of dentistry at 
3 Mountain Ave., Mendham, N.J. 07945. 

Dr. Marvin L. Brubaker. assistant 
professor of mathematics at Moravian 
College, was named chairman of the 
department beginning July l, 1974. 

'62 

Leslie R. Butler has been promoted to 
vice president and assistant to vice chair- 
man, Real Estate & Consumer Finance, of 
First Pennsylvania Corp. in Philadelphia. 

'63 

Madelyn Valunas. library instructor at 
Shippensburg State College, has been 



SUMMER 1974 



13 



promoted to assistant professor in the 
library effective September 1. 

The Rev. Frederick I. Fisher is now 
pastor of the recently-formed Hope 
Lutheran Church in Cherryville, Pa. He 
formerly served St. Peter's and Salem 
churches in Schuylkill County. 

'64 

Lynn G. Sanberg has joined the 
Industrial Relations Department of 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Division of 
Dresser Industries Inc. as manager- 
industrial relations, United States Division. 

Edward M Barabas earned the M.B.A. 
with a major in finance from Seton Hall 
University. He is quality assurance 
manager for Signalite, Neptune, N.J. and 
lives at 1117 Ripley Ave., Westfield, N.J. 
07090. 

Ken Mease has been awarded "Rhode 
Island Sportscaster of the Year" for his 
outstanding coverage of the New England 
Patriots and other New England teams. He 
is sports director for WPRI-TV, 
Providence. 

'65 

John F Grebe is assistant vice president 
of PNB Commercial Finance Corp., 
responsible for business development in the 
eastern U.S., and is working on his M.B.A. 
at Drexel University. He, his wife the 
former Carole Sloan '67. and daughter live 
at 2023 Hemlock Rd., Norristown, Pa. 
19401. 

'66 

The Rev. Ted Oswald and family have 
moved to 6462 Ridge Rd., Sharon Center, 
Ohio 44274. Formerly pastor of Bethany 
Lutheran Church in Ashtabula, he now 
serves St. Paul's, Sharon Center. 

John H Clapham is senior corporate 
trust officer and assistant secretary of The 
Fidelity Bank of Philadelphia. 

Edwin L Rehmeyer has returned from 
India after four years of teaching at the 
American Embassy School in New Delhi. 

Lt. Ronald L. Keiser is now stationed 
with the U.S. Navy in Honolulu. His ad- 
dress is 5977-A Gannet Ave.. Ewa Beach, 
Hawaii 96706. 

'67 

Marian L. Shatto has been promoted to 
mortgage administrator of Farmers First 
National Bank in Lancaster, Pa. 

Dr. Richard C. Kindig. a graduate of 
Temple University School of Dentistry, is 
practicing at the Perry County Health 
Center, Loysville, Pa. His wife, the former 
Dianne L. Swavely, R.N., is with Perry 
Village, a retirement center. 



Donna Ake Burkholder is president of 
the Ephrata (Pa.) Area Education Associa- 
tion. 

'68 

Sieve Mace is manager of Consolidated 
Freightways Martinsburg (W.Va.) ter- 
minal. He and his family live in 
Shepherdstown. 

Stephen M. Vak is now assistant to the 
superintendent of schools in the Pine Grove 
(Pa.) area school district. His wife is the 
former Sharon Fellerolf '68. 

Robert W. Hadfield has been promoted 
to assistant to the marketing manager. 
Architectural Ceiling Systems Division of 
Armstrong Cork Co. He and his family live 
at 106 White Oak Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 
17601. 

Dr. Martin W. Banschbach was guest 
lecturer for the SU Chemistry Department 
in May. He is a research biochemist at the 
Waisman Center on Mental Retardation at 
the University of Wisconsin. 

'69 

Douglas L Lepley was awarded a 
teaching assistantship at Lehigh University 
where he will teach freshman English while 
pursuing the Ph.D. His wife is the former 
Cynthia Ness '69 and they live with their 
two daughters at 14 SMAGS Apt. 122, 
R.D. 5, Bethlehem, Pa. 18015. 

Atty. Robert D Reber has been 
promoted to associate partner with the 
Reynier & Crocker law firm in Pottstown, 
Pa. His wife, the former Beverly Dalo. is a 
teacher in the Pottstown schools and they 
live in Audubon, Pa. 

Dr. Julie B. Stauf/er is now with the In- 
dian Health Service, 1 1 W. Lawer St., 
Chamberlain, S.D. 57325. 

Lt. James L. Avers is an instructor for 



the Navy Air Corps at Navigation Ground 
School. His address is 3822 Montego Dr., 
Corpus Christi, Tex. 78415. 

Suzanne Govier will perform as French 
horn soloist with the Evansville (111.) 
Philharmonic 1974-75 season. She received 
her B. Mus. from the New England Con- 
servatory and is now a candidate for the 
M.M. at Southern Illinois University. 

'70 

Henry DePerro has been promoted to 
manager of the General Services Office of 
Equitable Life Assurance Society in 
Paramus. N.J. He. his wife the former Bar- 
bara Hitchens '69 and two daughters now 
live at 16B Village Green, Budd Lake, N.J. 
07828. 

William C. Merz has been transferred to 
the Corporate Office of Owens Corning 
Fiberglass in Toledo. Ohio. 

David Broughman has been promoted to 
production planner at the Athens (Pa.) 
Ingersoll-Rand plant. He is responsible for 
heavy grinders, vibrators, high capability 
motors and angle wrenches. 

Dr. Leonard F. Bush he has retired as ex- 
ecutive director of the Geisinger Medical 
Center. Danville. Pa. 

Martha Barker Blessing was elected 
president of the Selinsgrove Area unit. 
American Association of University 
Women. 

Four members of the class were ordained 
to the Lutheran ministry at the Central 
Pennsylvania Synod. LCA. convention in 
Susquehanna's Chapel on June 23: Donald 
B. Green, called to the Union Deposit (Pa.) 
Charge; Dennis K. Hall, called to St. John's 
Church. May town, Pa.: H Franklin 
Showers, called to Lebanon Church, 
Chicago; William Q Stickler, called to 
Albany Park Church, Chicago. Showers 



Elected by LCA 

At the biennial convention of the Lutheran Church in America, July 3- 10 in 
Baltimore, five persons connected with Susquehanna University were elected to 
churchwide office. 

Dr. Robert J Marshall he '69 was reelected President of the Church for a 
four-year term and Dr. Albert P. Stauderman he '71 was reelected editor of The 
Lutheran magazine for two years. 

Dr. James J. Raun he '72. executive director of Tressler-Lutheran Service 
Associates, Camp Hill, Pa., was named to a second four-year term on the 
Management Committee of the Division For Mission in North America. 

Dr. John C. Horn he '65. chairman of the Susquehanna Board of Directors, 
was elected to a second four-year term on the Board of Publication and George 
R. F. Tamkeh '67 . assistant to the president, was elected to the same Board for a 
first four-year term. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




% - 



ft i*< .. 



m v 




_ >** 



Usually referred to as the Founder's Cross, this stone monument was placed in front 

of Selinsgrove Hall at Susquehanna many years ago to honor Dr. Benjamin Kurtz, 

who was instrumental in establishing Missionary Institute and served as its first 

superintendent, 1858-1865. The name Susquehanna University was adopted in 1895 

along with expansion of the curriculum. A large plaque on the back of the monument 

identifies Kurt: as the founder and also includes the inscription, SI MONUMENTUM 

REQU1R1S. CIRCUMSP1CE (If you seek his monument, look around you). This quotation 

has been credited to several historic personages but its real origin was with the 

son of Christopher Wren, who composed the tribute placed on the architect's tomb 

in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, upon his death in 1723. Translated from the 

Latin, the complete text reads: "Beneath lies buried the founder of this Church 

and City. Christopher Wren, who lived for more than ninety years, not for himself, 

but for the public good. Reader, if you seek his monument, look around you." The 

area around the Kurt: memorial was recently dressed up with new landscaping by Alan F. 

Straubel '66, a landscape designer operating under the slogan. The Natural Look. 



graduated from the Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago and the others from 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg. 

Dr. Alec Wyton he was honored with a 
Festival Evensong upon completion of 20 
years as organist and master of choristers at 
the Cathedral Church of St. John the 
Divine in New York City. 

'71 

Joseph B Cralle III. previously a staff 
accountant for Davies & Davies C.P.A. in 
New York City, is now pursuing his 
M.B.A. at the University of Vermont. 

Peggy Haas won first place in the finals 
of the national organ playing contest spon- 
sored by the American Guild of Organists 
at Plymouth Church, Cleveland, Ohio. She 



SUMMER 1974 



is organist and director of music at St. 
James Episcopal Church, Richmond, Va. 

Ellen Mizzoni Lake is with the Phar- 
maceuticals Division of CIBA-GEIGY 
Corp., Summit, N.J., in the Package 
Development section. Her husband An- 
drew, a '69 graduate of SUNY at New 
Paltz, is an analytical chemist with the 
same company. They live at 301 Maple 
Ave., Apt. 217, North Plainfield, N.J. 
07060. 

Jill E. Styger is a media teacher at Valley 
View and Rosemont elementary schools in 
Martinsburg, W.Va. 

Dr. George F. Harkins he becomes 
general secretary of the Lutheran Council 
in the U.S.A. on October 1. He has been in 
the central administration of the church for 
25 years and secretary of the LCA for the 



past six years. His wife is the former Janet 
Earhart '36. 

'72 

Laurie H. Hart is now a computer 
programmer with Wagner Electric Cor- 
poration in Newark, N.J. Her address is 
350 Parsippany Rd.. Apt. 90, Parsippany. 
N.J. 07054. 

James Z. Morehouse is now an account- 
ant with the securities section of the 
Bureau of Rates & Research, Pennsylvania 
Public Utility Commission. His address is 
Church Hill Manor, Reedsville, Pa. 17084. 

John B. Carey is an account executive 
trainee with the United States Trust Co. of 
New York. 

A. Russell Brown is working towards an 
advanced degree in education at Duquesne 
University. 

Stephen E. Aver has been promoted to 
assistant cashier of the First National Bank 
of Bradford County, Pa. 

'73 

Dorothy U. Muzzy is a junior 
programmer with IBM in Endicott, N.Y. 

Peter R Schuessler is a counselor at the 
Odyssey House in Salt Lake City. His ad- 
dress: Peggy Ann Apts., Apt. 8, 125 S. 6th 
East St., Salt Lake City, Utah 84102. 







SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1974 
Fall Sports Schedules 





FOOTBALL 




Sl4 


Grove City 


A 


S2I 


Westminister, Band Day 


H 


S28 


Juniata 


A 


05 


Geneva, Homecoming 


H 


0I2 


Albright (nite) 


A 


019 


Delaware Valley, Parents Day 


H 


026 


Wilkes, Kiwanis-Slagg Hal 


H 


N2 


Lycoming 


A 


N9 


Waynesboro 


A 


Nl6 


Upsala, Lutheran Youth Day 
SOCCER 


H 


S28 


Wagner 


A 


02 


Western Maryland 


A 


05 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


09 


Gettysburg 


H 


0I2 


Upsala 


A 


015 


Lycoming 


A 


023 


Elizabethtown 


H 


026 


St. Bonaventure 


H 


030 


Bucknell 


H 


N2 


Wilkes 


A 


N6 


Scranton 


H 


NI6 


Dickinson 


H 



Richard Sornhold is teaching social 
studies at Warrior Run Middle School. 
Keenly interested in Indian lore since his 
early teens, he has written feature articles 
for several newspapers and is a frequent lec- 
turer. 

Mary H. Donelik is taking graduate 
work in history at Abilene Christian 
College. Her address is 1841 ': Cedarcrest 
Dr.. Abilene, Tex. 79601. 

Eric J. Aiello is a radio announcer with 
WTSA. Brattleboro. Vt. He lives at 29 
Putney Rd., Brattleboro, Vt. 05301. 

Evelyn P Anderson is with the American 
Petroleum Institute in Washington, D.C. as 
secretary to the director of the Division of 
Exploration Affairs. She lives at 114 
Monroe St.. Apt. 302, Rockville, Md. 
20850. 

Robert M Harll is a retail sales 
associate with Forbes & Wallace Inc., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Robert A. Phipps is an instructional aide 
at Jemez Valley H.S., Jemez Pueblo. N.M. 

John W. Gracey is a teller in the Bank of 
Pennsylvania in Reading. 

Candace D. Card is an absence specialist 
with the Bank of America in San Francisco. 
Address: c/o F.G. Rennekar, 1 305 Webster 
St.. C107, Alameda, Calif. 94501. 

Susan J Lentzner is a tax auditor with 
IRS in Baltimore. 



"J DO" 





CROSSCOUNTRY 




S21 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


S25 


Bucknell 


H 


S28 


York 


A 


02 


Western Maryland 


A 


05 


Juniata & Delaware Valley 


H 


09 


Elizabethtown 


A 


012 


Albright 


A 


016 


Dickinson 


H 


022 


Wilkes & Baptist Bible 


W 


030 


Gettysburg 


A 


N6 


Scranton 


H 


N9 


MAC 

FIELD HOCKEY 


St. Joseph 


S30 


Juniata 


H 


03 


Bucknell 


A 


08 


Lycoming 


A 


012 


Dickinson 


A 


014 


Messiah 


H 


017 


Bloomsburg State 


H 


022 


Lebanon Vallev 


A 


026 


Wilkes 


H 


031 


Shippensburg State 
RESERVE FOOTBALL 


A 


S30 


Lycoming 


A 


07 


Lock Haven State 


H 


014 


Stevens Trade 


H 


021 


Juniata 


A 


028 


Lycoming 


H 


N4 


Bucknell 

RESERVE "SOCCER 


A 


010 


Bucknell 


A 


017 


Kings 


H 


021 


Dickinson 


H 


N13 


Bloomsburg State 


A 



SHAW-MONTGOMERY 
Sylvia B. Montgomery x'72 to Holland 
E. Shaw x'74. July 11, 1971. Holland 
received his B.A. in English literature from 
Eastern Baptist College. / Singletary Ave.. 
Sutton, Mass. 01527. 

WAELDNER-FINSEN 
JoanS. Finsen 72 to James R. Waeldner 
72. September 9, 1972. Karla Pahl Pagano 
'72 was maid of honor. / P.O. Box 8, 
Mirror Lake, N.H. 03853. 

EICHE-SCHREFFLER 

Beverly A. Schreffler x'74 to the Rev. 
Elmer H. Eiche '6/. June 9. 1973. Beverly is 
in her senior year at Westminster Choir 
College and Elmer is pastor of Zion 
Lutheran Church. Lebanon Township, N.J. 
/ Box 182-B. West Hill Rd. Gardner, N.J. 
08826. 

CURTIS-HANNEY 

Elizabeth L. Hanney to Robert W. Cur- 
tis '63. June 23, 1973. Mrs. Curtis is with 
the consulting firm of Linton, Mieldsa & 
Costin and Bob is with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Labor in Washington. / 1300 
Army-Navy Dr. No. 504, Arlington, Va. 
22202. 

ROBERTS-BLUNT 

Kathleen L. Blunt '68 to Charles A. 
Roberts, July 7, 1973. Kathy owns a small 
book shop in Clarkston, Mich, and teaches 
remedial reading. Her husband teaches 9th 
grade English and drama in Pontiac. / 3 E. 
Washington, Clarkston, Mich. 48016. 
LIGHTY-BERND 

Wendy Bernd x'74 to Mark Lichty, 
August 25, 1973. Wendy received her B.S. 
in nursing from Temple University and is a 
nurse at the Albert Einstein Medical 
Center. Philadelphia. / 5926 Marvine St., 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19141. 

3ASTI-MAURIELLO 

Marguerite Mauriello to John J. Basli 

73. October 6, 1973. Mrs. Basti is a 

graduate of Wagner College. / 7001 Fort 

Hamilton Pkwy., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11228. 

VINCENT-JONES 

Shirley R Jones 69 to Reginald P. Vin- 
cent Jr. / 1382 Ocean Ave., Sea Bright. 
N.J. 07760. 

AULD-BROWN 

Linda S. Brown '73 to Donald T. A uldJr. 
'71, February 1974, Grace Lutheran 
Church, Union, N.J. Barbara Philbrick '73 
was a bridesmaid. Linda teaches the 
perceptually impaired, Manalapan- 
Englishtown(N.J.) regional school district. 
/ 21 Hueston St., Union, N.J. 07083. 
FAGUE-SPRING 

Mrs. Aileen Spring to the Rev. Dr. 
Harland D. Fague '25. March 1, 1974, Em- 



manuel Lutheran Church. Naples. Fla. The 
Rev. Howard S. Hugos '48 officiated Dr. 
Fague is pastor emeritus of Emmanuel 
Lutheran Church. / Shoreline Club, 1698 
Gulf Shore Blvd. North, Naples. Fla. 
33940. 

PEREIRA-ROHLAND 

Debbie L Rohland x'74 to Antonio J.D. 
Pereira. March 7. 1974. Washington. D.C. 
Debbie continued her education at 
American University in the field of art. She 
and Mr. Pereira are living in Pontevedra, 
Spain. 

DAMBROCIA-LORENZ 

Cynthia J Lorenz '73 loJoseph P Dam- 
brocia '71. April 20, 1974, Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Utica, N.Y. In the 
wedding party were Kathy Gloster '74, 
Paula Eletto '73. Whitney Gay '71. and 
Louis Vermillion '70, Joe is credit manager 
for the Sherwin-Williams Paint Co.. Olean, 
N.Y. 

CAMPBELL-BOG ENRIEF 

Jane E. Bogenrief '74 to John R. 

Campbell, May 11, 1974. Jane has a 

summer position as lifeguard/swimcoach. / 

1006 Highland Ave., Abington. Pa. 19001. 

SPENCER-TRAMA 

Elaine A. Trama to Jeffrey Spencer '68. 
May 18. Horsham (Pa.) Friends Meeting 
House. Mrs. Spencer is a teacher and Jeff is 
branch manager of the Warminster office 
for Willow Grove Federal Savings & Loan 
Association. / 675 E. Street Rd. No. 215. 
Warminster. Pa. 18974. 

RAVA-FALCONE 

Tina M. Falcone to Richard F. Rava '72. 
June 8, 1974, St. Rocco's Church, Pittston, 
Pa. The bride holds her degree in elemen- 
tary education from East Stroudsburg 
State College. Richard is working toward 
the master's degree at the University of 
Scranton and is sales manager for Pepsi- 
Cola in Wilkes-Barre. 

SMAR-OBERLIN 

Joyce E Oberlin '74 to Benedict J Smar 
Jr. '74. June 15. 1974. Sharon Lutheran 
Church. Selinsgrove. Pa. Dale Orris '75, 
David Rohrer 76. Linda Wilson '76. 
Douglas Hornherger '77 and John P White 
'76 were members of a brass quintet. Lynn 
Lrbanczyk '75 served as maid of honor. 
After a summer of teaching at the 
Northeast Music Camp. Ware. Mass., the 
newlyweds will be studying at the Universi- 
ty of Michigan, where they both have 
graudate assistantships in music. 
YOUNG-HIGGINS 

Marsha L. Higgins lo Richard V Young 
'54. July 13. 1974. Sharon Lutheran 
Church. Selinsgrove. Pa. lovlet Dietz Carr 
'52 was organist and Charles II "Buss" 
Carr '52 was vocalist. Mrs. Young is a den- 
tal assistant in Northumberland and Rich 
teaches biology in the Shikellamy school 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



district. / 310 East Dr., Sunbury, Pa. 
17801. 

DOUGLAS-HORNER 
Debra P. Horner '74 to Peter M. Douglas 
'74. July 20, 1974. Sue Gordon '75 was 
organist. Martha Brandwene '75, Jesse Hill 
'75. and Linda Pratz '74 were attendants. 
Debra is an administrative trainee with 
Equitable Life Assurance Society, 
Wilmington, Del. / Stonybrook Apts. No. 
122C, 801 Cooper St., Woodbury, N.J. 
08096. 



Born Crusaders 

To William and Marjorie Kostenbauder 
Finley '56. through adoption, a daughter, 
Rebecca Kim, born in Seoul, Korea, June 
7, 1971. She arrived in the U.S. on 
February 15, 1973. The Finleys have 
another daughter, Margaret Anne, age 1 1. 
/ 17 Stony Brook Rd.. Medfield, Mass. 
02052. 

To Joseph F. Jr. x'72 and Carol Sensenig 
Klein '72. a son Joseph F. Ill, May 31, 
1973. / 36-B Parkway Apt., Cherry Hill, 
N.J. 08034. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. Dennis T. Hall '70. 
their second son, David L., September 29, 

1973. / 8 West High St, Maytown, Pa. 
17550. 

To Gerald S. and Carol Cairns Henry 
'63. their first child, a daughter, Karen 
Elizabeth, October 6, 1973. Carol is on 
leave from her guidance counseling position 
and Father is in quality control with RCA. 
/ 1001 Edgemoor Ct., Lancaster, Pa. 
17601. 

To Robert W '. '72 and Margaret 
McCracken Schilpp '69. their first child, a 
son, Craig Allan, November 30, 1973. Bob 
is with the Federal government at Harry 
Diamond Laboratories in Washington 
D.C. / 8753 Contee Rd., Apt. 301 , Laurel, 
Md. 20810. 

To Donald H. '70 and Karen Kaneen 
Fetterolj x71 , their third child, a daughter, 
Sarah Cragg, February 27, 1974. / 801 
Summit Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Bender II 
'67. a son, Bradley Frank, March 1 1, 1974. 
Charles is a bank examiner for the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Co., Harrisburg office. / 
634 South Coldbrook Ave., Chambers- 
burg, Pa. 17201. 

To David and Barbara Brown Troutman 
'67, twins, a daughter and son, Michelle 
Leigh and Michael Edward, March 19, 

1974, A big sign, "Double Trouble," 
greeted Dave when he arrived for work at 
Troutman's Gulf Station that morning. 
/ 401 N. Tenth St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 



To Capt. William E. '64 and Sarah 
Schnure Lindsay '65. their second child, a 
daughter, Elizabeth Ann. March 24, 1974. 
The Lindsays were all in Selinsgrove for 
Alumni Weekend and Baby's christening 
by President Gustave Weber in the Horn 
Meditation Chapel. Bill is a jet pilot in- 
structor stationed at Shaw AFB. / 500 Ar- 
nold, Sumter, S.C. 29150. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David J. Mitten '71 , a 
daughter, Mary Ann, April 12, 1974. 
Baby's godfather is James E. Price '71. 
Dave is a caseworker for the Lycoming 
County Board of Assistance, Williamsport. 
/ 124 Walnut St.. Ashland, Pa. 17921. 

To Dr. William A. and Barbara Maier 
Remaley '65. a daughter. Abbey Lynn, 
May 15, 1974. Dr. Remaley is associate 
professor of business administration at 
Susquehanna. / R.D. 1, Box 279, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Robert B '65 and Melinda Karns 
Mancke '66. their second daughter, Helen 
Elizabeth, through adoption. Helen was 
born June 1, 1972 in Korea and arrived in 
the U.S. May 29, 1974. / 219 Altamont 
Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 21228. 



Deaths 



Melvin G. Barber, Roaring Spring, Pa., 
May 20, 1973, husband of the former Mary 
Weaverling '32. 

John S. Hoover '09, Snydertown, Pa., 
early 1974. 

Charles E. Hilbish '29. Northumber- 
land, Pa. 

Russell A.G. Stetler '21. Canton, Pa., 
February 1, 1974. Holder of an M.A. from 
Penn State University, he was a science 
teacher and athletic coach, then became a 
school superintendent in several Penn- 
sylvania districts, retiring in that capacity 
at Matawan.N.J. in 1962. He was an active 
Presbyterian, a Mason, civic leader, and 
published short story author. His brother is 
Thomas H. Stetler '23. 

Howard J. Williams, North Syracuse, 
N.Y.. February I, 1974, husband of the 
former Amelia Krapf'33. 

Dr. William B. Frye, Bloomsburg, Pa., 
February 6, 1974. husband of the former 
Hazel Mabus '26. 

John J. Bryan '32. Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
February 11, 1974. He earned the M.A. 
from New York University and taught 
mathematics in Hanover Township, Pa. for 
45 years prior to retirement in 1961. He was 
a P1AA football and basketball official for 
many years. 

Joseph J Zak '30. Boca Raton, Fla., 
March 5, 1974. 

Margaret Kline Ricedorf, West Chester, 



Pa., March 1974, wife of Robert E. 
Ricedorf '50. 

Alia C Reinold '18. Lancaster, Pa., 
March 17, 1974. 

Clyde "Skip" Jacobs '65. Cambridge, 
Ohio, March 31, 1974, in a balloon accident 
when the gondola drifted into high tension 
wires, severing the balloon from the gon- 
dola. A pilot, sky diver, skin diver and 
balloonist, he was a salesman for the Ridge 
Oil Co. and a partner in a number of Ohio 
business interests. He was a member of St. 
Benedict Catholic Church. His widow the 
former Holly Leadbealer '65 survives. 

Jennie Barklie Small '27, Drums, Pa., 
April 10, 1974. She earned her M.A. from 
Bucknell University and taught school in 
Ashley and Hazleton. Pa. She was an active 
member of Drums Methodist Church and a 
judge for the Pennsylvania Federation of 
Garden Clubs. 

James T Meckley x'26. Conemaugh, 
Pa., April 17, 1974. Assistant professor of 
education at Slippery Rock State College, 
he held B.S. and M.Ed, degrees from the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

Anna Nichols Micka '34. Harrisburg, 
Pa., May 1974. 

Oscar J. Brubaker, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
May 1, 1974, father of Lester L. '59. Mar- 
vin L '61 . and Oscar J. Brubaker, husband 
of the former Karen Boyer '66. 

George P. Schwartz '34. Sugarloaf, Pa., 
M ay 5, 1 974. He earned the master's degree 
from the University of Pennsylvania and 
was music supervisor of Hazleton (Pa.) 
schools. He was recognized as organizer 
and director of the first handbell choir in the 
area. He held membership in the First 
United Presbyterian Church and several 
Masonic lodges. 

John F. Dale x'07. Newark, Del., May 
20, 1974. He was a teacher in Union County 
schools for several years and then a 
businessman in Mifflinburg. Pa. 

Elwood E. Rowe, Selinsgrove, Pa., May 
25, 1974. Secretary-treasurer of Wood- 
Metal Industries Inc. of Kreamer, he was 
the brother of Chester G. Rowe '52 and 
father of Kim Rowe x'74. 

Bertha Welter Hoffman x'26. Middle- 
burg, Pa., June 10, 1974. A Snyder County 
school teacher, she taught the women's Bi- 
ble class at St. Peter Lutheran Church, 
Kreamer, and was a member of several 
educational and historical associations. 
Her husband is Herman E. Hoffman x'23 
and a son is John Hoffman '40. 

John Bzdil, Sunbury, Pa., June 22, 1974, 
father of John Bzdil '68 who is married to 
the former Theresa Esposito x'73. 

Michael R.Joyce, Erie, Pa., July 2, 1974, 
in a bicycle-automobile accident. He was 
the 14-year-old son of the Rev. William G. 
'52 and Jean McDonald Jovee '51. 



SUMMER 1974 



17 



Chuck Smell: and his 

educated toe — out to regain 

his NCAA PAT record. 



SU Sports 



by PETE SILVESTRI 




The PROGNOSTICATORdoes not have to go too far out on 
the proverbial limb to predict winning seasons for Crusader 
men's fall sports teams. All three fielded young squads last 
fall and will be well stocked with returning lettermen. 

The soccer team, which enjoyed its best record in Sus- 
quehanna history last year, and the cross country squad, 
which rebounded from 1972's 1-1 1 mark to post an 8-5 card in 
'73 should be strong again. And Jim Hazlett seems to have 
recruited the necessary ingredient — big linemen — to turn last 



fall' 



-7 football team into a strong group that will aim for 



the first winning grid campaign here since 1970. Only three 
football starters have graduated, and 27 lettermen are return- 
ing. 

This spring Hazlett concentrated on attracting strong 
linemen to Susquehanna, and he was successful. The new- 
comers include Pat Lowe of Garden City, N.Y., transfer from 
Nassau Community College, 6' 225 lbs.; Gabe Develli of 
Sharpsville, Pa., 6' 225 lbs.; Mike Piersol of Sinking Springs, 
Pa., 6'6" 235 lbs.; and Kevin Zumpettaof Moorestown, N.J., 
6' I" 230 lbs., all of whom are bigger than anyone on the 1973 
roster. Hazlett also wanted linebackers, and got some good 
ones, including Rick Koch of Levittown, Pa., 5' 10" 175 lbs., 
and Joe LoCastro of Barrington, N.J., a transfer from Dre.xel 
University which dropped football. 6' 210 lbs. 

Hopefully some of these recruits will shore up the 
Crusader defensive unit, which was the weakest in the 
Northern College Division of the Middle Atlantic 
Conference last fall, giving up an average of 284.4 yards per 
conference game. 

The development of the defense should be the key to the 
success of the team, as the offense last season demonstrated 
an ability to move the ball. The main cog in the offense will 
again be 5' 10" 175 lb. running back Tim Lawlor of 
Shillington. Pa., whose season total of 669 yards last year was 
the most for a freshman in Susquehanna's long football 



history. Also returning are a pair of experienced quarter- 
backs, John Bird of Bloomsburg, Pa. and Mike Buterbaugh 
of Gibsonia, Pa.; fullback Jim Camut of Johnstown, Pa.; last 
season's top pass receiver Jeff Steltz of Wyomissing. Pa. at 
split end; and the entire offensive line led by tackle Bob Brett 
of Roslyn, Pa. The only graduate from last year's offensive 
unit was halfback Dave Dagle. 

The Crusaders will also get points from the toe of Chuck 
Smeltz of Sunbury. He has booted 58 consecutive PATs, not 
far behind the NCAA record of 65 set last season by Greg 
Clark, since graduated from Appalachian State. Smeltz can 
kick for distance as well as with accuracy and consistency. 
He set a school record last season with 10 field goals, and tied 
a school mark by connecting on a 47-yarder. 

Top veterans on the defensive eleven are 6'2" 200 lb. 
tackle Tony Plastino, of Lancaster Pa., last season's leading 
tackier; Smeltz, a 5' 10" 210 lb. tackle when not place- 
kicking; 5' 10" 175 lb. linebacker Jim Reyle of Newburgh, 
N.Y.; and safety Pete Rambo of Philadelphia, whose ability 
far exceeds his size, 5'7" 1 50 lbs. Rambo's foot is also a defen- 
sive weapon. He was one of the top punters in the MAC last 
year with an average of 36.3 yards. The defense suffered most 
from graduation, losing Mike Fabian, whom Hazlett calls the 
best defensive back he's ever coached, and rugged end Tom 
Jeffrey. 

Hazlett believes the team has "a good chance of at least 
breaking even," but says he is "not predicting a fabulous 
record" because of lack of size among the veteran interior 
defensive linemen and linebackers. However, if newcomers 
work out in those areas, the Crusaders "may be strong." 



There will be several new faces on the Susquehanna 
coaching staff next year, although one of them may look 
familiar to visiting alumni. Dick Purnell '58, formerly coach 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



at Shikellamy High School in Sunbury, will be a volunteer 
football assistant. New full-time staff members are Bob 
Muirhead. formerly coach at Wofford College, who will be 
head track coach and a football assistant; Bill Frey, a recent 
M.A. recipient at Western Michigan, who will be an assistant 
in track and football; and Connie Delbaugh, also a former 
Shikellamy coach, who will be field hockey and women's ten- 
nis coach. Also, Bill Kepner, a former Elizabethtown soccer 
star and now principal at Penn's Creek Elementary School, 
will be interim soccer coach while Dr. Neil Potter is on sab- 
batical in Taiwan. 

* * * 

Although the best campaign in the school's 14-year 
soccer history (6-3-4) should be a tough act to follow. Potter 
nevertheless predicts that this fall's booters "will play as well 
if not better." Of course. Potter notes that it's easy for him to 
say so, since he won't be around when the action starts. 
Interim coach Kepner will have a veteran group to work with, 
including 18 returning lettermen. Last year's squad included 
only five seniors. 

For the second straight year the key man to replace is a 
center fullback named Eickhoff. Last year it was the gradua- 
tion of Karl Eickhoff that left a hole there. It was filled in 
1 973 by his brother Rich, who graduated in June after making 
the all-conference team. There are no more Eickhoffs avail- 
able, but competition for the position among several experi- 
enced players is sure to produce a capable performer. 

Also gone from a defense that was crucial to last year's 
success is halfback Bill Atkinson. Goalie Chris Blackmon of 
New Britain, Pa., returns, however. In regular season games 
last season he gave up an average of only 1.2 goals, as the team 
allowed only 15 goals in 12 games to set a new school regular 
season record. The Crusaders' five shutouts is also a school 
mark. 

While the defense may have been weakened by gradua- 
tion, the offense was not. Returning linemen include two of 
last year's top three men in goals and assists — Kurt Kohler of 
Grosse Point Woods. Mich. (15) and Bob Hazel of Chesa- 
peake City, Md. (14). The Crusaders will have a "fast line 
with the most scoring potential of any team at Susquehanna 
the past eight years," says Potter. Returning lettermen at 
halfback include co-captains Bob Carr of Hanover, N.J. and 
John Waddell of Reedsville, Pa. 

The incoming freshmen include six all-conference selec- 
tions, and the first black to play soccer at Susquehanna, Essy 
Joseph, a native of Haiti. 



year's successful group are returning, including pace-setter 
Jeff Yoder of Mt. Carmel, Pa., who continues to improve as 
he demonstrated by breaking his own University record in the 
mile run with the track team this spring, Dan Ditzler (Rose- 
mont, Pa.), Dennis Enders (New Cumberland, Pa.), Joe 
Cramer (Toms River, N.J.), Ray Everngam (Baltimore, 
Md.) Woody McEvoy (Toms River, N.J.) and Scott Cree 
(Watchung, N.J.). 



Although the schedule has not been finalized as this goes 
to press, the Rugby Club plans seven or eight weekend con- 
tests this fall, with home matches slated for the new field 
opened last spring on Sassafras Street. Contests are expected 
with clubs from Dickinson, Franklin & Marshall, Lafayette, 
Moravian, West Chester State, Bucknell, Penn State and 
Mt. St. Mary's. 

Since its inception in 1971 the Rugby Club has been 
highly successful under the direction of founder-player-coach 
Joe Staggers, a Susquehanna history instructor. The ruggers 
play both a fall and a spring season. After losing most of its 
matches in the spring of 1 97 1 , the club has been over the .500 
mark in each season since, including a perfect 7-0 card in the 
spring of 1973 and a fine 8-2-1 showing last spring. 

The ruggers concluded their season last spring by taking 
second place in the 12-team Schaefer Tournament held at 
Lehigh University. The campaign saw two victories each 
against Bucknell, Dickinson and Franklin & Marshall, a win 
and a tie with Lafayette, and a triumph over Moravian. Both 
losses were to West Chester, including the title game of the 
Schaefer Tournament. 

Coach Staggers notes that the club is usually stronger in 
the spring when it gets the benefit of several athletes who are 
busy with football in the fall. However, he still expects more 
wins than losses this fall. 

The roster includes: Dave Allison '75 (Wayne, Pa.), 
prop; Tom Jacobi '75 (Camp Hill, Pa.), wing forward; George 
Epstein '75 (Levittown, Pa.), second row; Glenn Stoudt '77 
(Reading, Pa.), hooker; Barry Hartshorn '77 (Stroudsburg, 
Pa.), winger; Mat Creutzmann '76 (Cresco, Pa.), winger; 
Tom Monastra '76 (Goshen, N.Y.). fly-half; David 
Chambers '77 (West Caldwell, N.J.), scrum-half; Jacob 
Klein '77 (Middletown, N.Y.), prop; Dave Karner '76 
(Scotch Plains, N.J.), center; Kent Houser '76 (Lewistown, 
Pa.), fullback; Tom Jeffrey '74 (Havertown, Pa.), number-8; 
Dave Wick '7 1 and Dave Dunn '72, who are living in the area, 
second row. 



The field hockey team has nowhere to go but up, after an 
0-7-1 campaign in 1973. The Crusader women have won only 
two games in the last three years, and new field hockey coach 
Mrs. Delbaugh inherits a team that has not enjoyed a winning 
season since the 5-0 slate of 1962. although the .500 mark was 
attained in 1963, '64, '65 and '67. 



The cross cpuntry team, which begins and ends its home 
races on the track before the football fans, may again enjoy 
more success than the gridders. All the runners from last 



Two late spring sports items that missed the last issue; 
Javelin thrower Glenn Levengood of Gilbertsville, Pa. 
traveled to Eastern Illinois University the last week in M ay to 
become the first Crusader ever to enter the NCAA College 
Division track meet. He took sixth place in Division III 
javelin competition and earned an "All-American" certifi- 
cate. Pitcher-outfielder Doug Brinkman of Glen Cove, N.Y., 
who graduated in June with four baseball letters to his credit, 
was given honorable mention on the All-MAC team, an- 
nounced in June. He had been a first team choice as a sopho- 
more. 



SUMMER 1974 



19 



HOMECOMING 
OCT. 4,5 

features 

Football 

vs. Geneva 

and 

William Windom 

as "Thurber" 




ATTENTION PARENTS 

I f this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address a< your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 



^6560 4* is 
5 f M JANE ^CHNUKL 
^0 SubyutHAlMM AVt 
SELINSGRUVE pa 



-5 I 



l'nfo 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undellverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



j 

FALL 1974 

Saswtuana Blmaus { 


1 •» ■ 

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Some interesting pictures emerge with the opening of 

school. Moving into dorms. Dad fixing the bike seat, the 

new speed bumps on campus roads, care of one's favorite 

avocado plant. And at Opening Convocation, those honored 

with degrees line up with President Weber: The Rev H. Lee 

Hebel '48. Perkasie. Pa.. D.D , Edwin B Bronner. Haverford 

College librarian and historian. Pd.D.: The Rev Gilbert V. 

Hartke. Catholic University drama department chairman who 

also delivered the address. Litt.D. At lower right. 

business manager Tom Dodge receives the $500 Wilkinson 

Award for administrative excellence. Jim Bales '75 of 

Danville. Pa. was given the $500 Lindback Award. Other 

presentations: John Schwartz '76. Bristol. Pa.. Stine- 

Robison Mathematics Prize: Timothy Blair '76, Blairs Mills. 

Pa.. Elizabeth Eyster Music Award: Susan Gordon '75. 

Johnstown. Pa. and Jim Jordan '75. Erackville. Pa.. Presser 

Foundation Music Scholarships: Alpha Xi Delta and Phi Sigma 

Kappa, scholarship trophies. Ten baccalaureate degrees 

were conferred and 158 University Scholars were recognized. 




School's 
Open! 





IN OUR COVER: The beginning of another 
ear — Susquehanna"s one hundred seven- 
:enth. And some other photos are opposite. 

Inside, this quarter we feature the Report of 
K President for 1973-74. The Report reveals a 
ealthy institution which remains committed 
) liberal arts ideals while expanding its ser- 
ices to the current generation of career- 
riented students. An institution operating in 
le fiscal black while alert to the need for 
ireful vigilance and new sources of income, 
/e commend the Report to your reading — and 
jggest that you'll also find the article on ad- 
lissions of great interest. 

All Susquehanna alumni are reminded that 
lis is the season for submitting suggestions to 
le Nominating Committee for action in 
anuary. All suggestions must be received by 
le Committee (c/o the Alumni Office) by 
anuary 1. Required information: name and 
lass of candidate, address, occupation, sup- 
orting comments, name and class of person 
aking the suggestion. To be elected by mail 
allot are five members-at-large to three-year 
:rms on the Association's Executive Board. 

EDITOR 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 



Staff Writers 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



.HUtMlMtmlHWiUl 



Alumni Associutio 



The Susquehanna Rlumnus 



Vol. 44 



FALL 1974 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

School'sOpen! INSIDE FRONT COVER 

Report of the President 1973-74 4 

Concerns About Admissions 28 

Advanced Degrees 33 

SU Sports 34 

by Pete Silvestri 

"I Do" 35 

Winter Sports Schedules 35 

Born Crusaders 36 

Deaths 37 

Directory of Alumni Association Officers 38 



eorge H. Banttey '41, president; William C. Davenport 
3, Robert Hackenberg '56. vice presidents; Signe S. 
ates 71. secretary; Chester G. Rowe '52, treasurer; 
ouglas E Arthur '49, Henry J, Keil '39, Edward S. Rogers 
I "42. Samuel D, Ross Jr. '54, representatives on the 
nlverslty Board ol Directors; Simon B, Rhoads '30. Louis 
Santangelo '50. representatives on the University Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Committee, 






vecutive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1975: 
avier Abbott '35. Jane Southwick Mathias '49. Peter M. 
unn '57, Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68. S. John Price '42. Term 
<piring 1976: Samuel D Clapper '68. Alan C. Lovell '70. 
ames Gormley '55. Lester C. Heilman '52, Franklin G. 
mlth '55 Term expiring 1977: Maria Wernikowski 
lacFarlan '62, Elwood M. McAllister '49, Virginia Carlson 
McKenzie '69. Neil R. Smith '63, James W. White '58. 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, I93l, at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 1 7870, under the Act of August 24, 19I2. Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



FALL 1974 





SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



INTRODUCTION 



Susquehanna is, beyond question, a fine school. 
Perhaps this was made most evident in a team 
meeting the last night your visitors were on 
campus. To a person, each member of the team 
expressed satisfaction with the thought that his 
child might be a Susquehanna student. Can there 
be a greater test? 

THE UNIVERSITY was very pleased with this statement 
contained in the report submitted by the visiting team of 
evaluators representing the Middle States Association at the 
conclusion of their intensive three-day examination of the 
University last January. These periodic visits from Middle 
States, every ten years, are used to examine the academic 
programs of colleges and universities and to recommend 
reaccreditation. A letter was forthcoming from the Middle 
States Association in June formally announcing the 
reaccreditation of the University for the next ten years. 

The worth of such an evaluation by a peer group from a 
variety of other colleges and universities rests with its ability 
to transmit to us observations which we ourselves are prone to 
overlook or to take for granted. To be judged by one's peers is 
in the best tradition of the American system and, for 
Susquehanna, it has provided insight for future growth and 
development. We tend to be rather smug about what we have 
accomplished and need to be awakened to the changing 
nature of higher education and the fact that complacency 
often results in ground lost and the cutting edge dulled. 

While the past decade has been one of significant growth 
and development on our campus, and has been accomplished 
with a sense of pride and satisfaction, what was done in the 
past is not necessarily a guarantee for a successful future. The 
Middle States Report speaks to this! If there is one overriding 
theme that dominates thought in higher education today it is 
that the "good times" of the 1960s are over, perhaps forever. 
The days of an abundant supply of qualified students, the 
infusion of funds for construction from Federal and private 
sources, and the generally favorable cost of a college 
education have given way to greater competition among an 
increasing and more diverse number of post-secondary 
institutions competing for a dwindling pool of college-age 
students, an almost complete withdrawal of funds by the 
Federal government for facilities construction, and the 
anguish of the middle income parent attempting to find the 
means of paying for post-secondary educational opportuni- 
ties which have increased in cost by 40 percent over the past 
five years. 

Inflation has not been any less kind to Susquehanna and 
we have witnessed an increase of from 7-9 percent annually in 



our costs, but the more urgent concern would appear to be the 
reluctance of many institutions to adapt themselves to today's 
educational needs. I am convinced that there is a place for 
Susquehanna in higher education during the years ahead and 
that our type of institution, if sufficiently motivated, can play 
an even more prominent role than before. The challenge is a 
willingness to examine present methods of operation and 
programs and to emerge with a clearer vision of what higher 
education must become. 

Until recently, the pressures confronting higher 
education were those which any business or professional 
person would be thankful to face. The demand for our 
services outran the supply of openings available at the four- 
year institutions, a constant flow of funds was available, and 
interest rates on borrowed funds at 6-7 percent stimulated 
manageable growth. More importantly, the traditional 
methodology in higher education was sufficient to satisfy all 
but the most active learners. As the 1970s unfolded, however, 
the quick erosion which took place at many four-year colleges 
in terms of both enrollment and mission resulted from a 
complacency and an imprecise understanding of higher 
education today. Many institutions remained wedded to 
outmoded curricular patterns and techniques emphasizing 
the traditional classroom approach. Management tech- 
niques were even less precise and were predicated on straight 
line budget projections geared to satisfying "the need of the 
moment." Funds were generated for almost every 
conceivable project with little attention given to long-range 
budgetary effects or to the merit of such programs in a total 
institutional sense. In a nutshell, growth and development 
were fragmented — each teacher enshrined in his own niche, 
and little attention given to a total institutional approach to 
both program planning and personnel involvement. While 
what was done was safe and accepted, the question must be 
asked whether this perpetuation of ihestatus quo is sufficient 
in today's rapidly changing world. As viewed by the visiting 
Middle States Committee, the obvious answer, with which I 
concur, is "No." 

In defense of the status quo I believe we all have hoped 
that things would settle down following the recent turmoil on 
college campuses and that the four-year liberal arts colleges 
would return to what we knew prior to the trauma of the last 
half-decade. Even if this false hope had been confirmed, a 
return to normalcy would have neglected an evaluation of the 
facts. Enrollments at many colleges are down, costs continue 
to increase, and more and more students question the worth 
and expense of a college education. We are entering a most 
competitive situation in which students are attracted to those 
campuses offering superior facilities and challenging 
programs. With regard to the former, our facilities are good 
and the addition of a new physical education building will 
serve to place Susquehanna well ahead of many institutions of 
a similar size and nature. In the latter category, programs, we 



FALL 1974 



are solid but traditional and, as Middle States points out, our 
attempts to resolve curricular tensions have been somewhat 
•'situational" or "cosmetic" and have avoided the more 
fundamental question of studying a redefinition of the 
teaching-learning process. It is in this area where much of our 
efforts must be expended in future years. 

My confidence is enhanced by the ability of our faculty 
which, as noted by Middle States, is competent and sincerely 
interested in providing better educational opportunities. Our 
need however, is to attack the fragmentation which exists 
within the University and to broaden the vision of the various 
disciplines so that this vision transcends departmental lines 
and involves our faculty and staff in a more total institutional 
pattern of thinking. To meet the most prominent concerns of 
the Middle States summary, we must plan, develop and 
implement better programs based on our liberal-education 
philosophy which are, in some cases, viable alternatives to 
prevailing discipline-based curricula. As Dean Reuning 
points out. "the point of departure (for new curriculum 
development) must be the logic of our curriculum 
development up to this point. I believe that it is safe to say that 
the objectives we had in mind three years ago (for the 3-3 
program) have not as yet materialized as fully as we had 
hoped. This is especially true with the Core program. One 
must not lose sight of the fact that this program and the major 
programs have relied too much on tradition and traditional 
approaches in teaching and subject matter taught. ... I have 
a feeling that in both cases the institution's response to change 
has been spotty if not insufficient." Regardless of the changes 
that are made and the new programs to be explored in 
curriculum revitalization, the basic need for a core of 
knowledge taught within a liberal arts framework will be 
preserved. As Dean Reuning also states, "we must still be 
able to communicate effectively, analyze critically and see 
present day concerns in perspective and interrelationship." 
The issue seems obvious, in today's educational environment 
the disciplines are an inadequate basis for the organization of 
liberal learning! 

While all of us associated with the University will be 
involved in change, the faculty is the key to change. 
Traditionally, the teacher is a scholar who conveys 
information to others. His methodologies and enthusiasm are 
related to his discipline. It may well be, however, that in the 
future the faculty member's role will be more that of a "co- 
learner," "group leader" or "counselor." Hence, the fac- 
ulty's role may need redefinition in the future. 

Our faculty and staff are extremely competent and I am 
certain that most will rise to the occasion and assist 
Susquehanna in building an even more viable educational 
program. The future may bring with it some dislocations of 
staff, faculty and resources, particularly as we strive to find 
better approaches to education while enrollment patterns 
change. I stress here that change for its sake alone will not be 



tolerated. Change must be thoroughly planned and thought 
through. What is done may not have total unanimity on 
campus, but you can be assured that all elements of the 
campus will be involved in the planning stages. 

In summary, the type of program we have in mind is 
reflected in a pilot project now sponsored by a consortium of 
educational organizations, including the American 
Association of Colleges. We hope to participate in this 
program but. if not. its perspective is important to us. The 
program has the following point of view which. I believe, is 
applicable to Susquehanna: 

1) The organization of knowledge which more 
adequately reflects the inter-connectedness of human ex- 
perience and the systemic nature of the world, and which ex- 
hibits an awareness of the dependence upon the multiple 
modes of knowing. 

2) Educational experiences which can help students 
acquire patterns of thinking and understanding which 
contribute to their capacity to shape purposefully our 
physical and social world in our time, while developing in 
them a sense of calling, in which life and career are integrated. 

3) Programs for faculty development and self-renewal 
designed to support sustained, effective involvement in the 
change process. 

What is to come will require, as stated earlier, a 
complete review of resource allocation — both personnel and 
financial. The involvement of the alumni and friends of 
Susquehanna will be crucial. We must strive to achieve a 
sense of "community" in which all elements of the University 
community will play an active role. To perform as we intend, 
it will be necessary to ask more faculty, staff members and 
directors to involve themselves to a greater extent than is now 
the case. Most will respond, and here the extra effort will be 
more than compensated for by being involved in a more 
meaningful educational program. Funds will be needed, but 
we are confident that new programs of merit will attract 
increasing support from alumni, friends and private 
philanthropic groups. 

The Middle States Association has emphasized that 
Susquehanna is at a "crossroads." This, I believe, is true of 
most institutions. How well we respond to this challenge u ill 
determine our future. I believe Susquehanna will respond. 




Q £U^ — 



Gustave W. Weber 
President 



September 1974 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ADMISSIONS 



ENROLLMENT AT SUSQUEHANNA held steady 
during the 1973-74 year at about 1400 students. The 
recruitment of incoming students for the fall of 1974 
signalled, once again, the University's continuing ability to 
attract a full class of freshmen during a time when many other 
institutions are experiencing difficulty in meeting quotas. We 
note an increase of interest in both the liberal arts and 
business fields for the coming year. The beginning enrollment 
for September should include about 440 new students and a 
total student body of over 1400. 

As with most institutions, the University has ex- 
perienced some deterioration in the number of applications 
received. From a high figure of over 1400 in 1972 the number 
of applications slipped to about 1200 this past year. The 
quality of the student body, however, appears to be about the 
same. Almost 80 percent of these students come to us from 
the upper two-fifths of their graduating secondary school 
classes. 

This matter of enrollment is one that the University must 
address itself to over the next several years. As the pool of 
college age students levels off, it remains to be seen whether 
Susquehanna can remain at its present enrollment level and 
retain quality. The quality of the educational program is what 
attracts students, and the University's willingness to ex- 



periment with new but sound approaches may be the deter- 
mining factor. 

Revised estimates of the number of students expected to 
enroll at institutions of higher learning over the next several 
decades, from the Carnegie Commission Report, point 
toward an increasingly competitive situation for the private 
college. The Commission foresees 1.5 million fewer students 
in 1980 than originally estimated, and 3.4 million fewer 
students in the year 2000. In Pennsylvania, for the fall of 
1973, 10,000 more students enrolled at all colleges and 
universities than during the previous year, but private four- 
year institutions evidenced a net decline of 347 students. 

Susquehanna can take pride in the fact that its 
enrollment remains oversubscribed but, at the same time, 
must assert a more aggressive posture in its recruitment 
efforts. Again, I stress that our ability to remain viable will, in 
large measure, be predicated on our ability to design and 
carry forward sound educational programs worthy of at- 
tracting students. This must be accomplished with a respect 
for the liberal arts philosophy and with an eye toward retain- 
ing the liberal arts as a sound and necessary base for educa- 
tion. 

It was necessary for the University to announce a 5 
percent increase in costs for the coming year, thereby 
bringing tuition to $2265 and room and board to $525 and 
$575 respectively. It costs a student about $3500 per year to 
attend Susquehanna today. Although the average increase in 
the cost of running the University rose by almost 9 percent 
over the past year, the Board of Directors felt that to pass this 



ENROLLMENT GROWTH AT SUSQUEHANNA 

1600 



1400 



1200 



1000 



800 



600 



400 



1392- 



1394 




.1194. 



1121 







1957-58 1961-62 1965-66 



1969-70 



1970-71 



1971-72 



1972-73 



1973-74 



FALL 1974 



entire increase on to the student and his parents might erode 
Susquehanna's competitive position. The difference in costs 
not covered by the added tuition charge is compensated for 
through general cost-saving measures and budget deductions 
in non-educational areas. 

As mentioned earlier, the cost of attending Susquehanna 
is moderate in relation to many other institutions, but tuition 
has still increased from $1900 to $2265 over the past three 
years. The burden of financing a college education is felt more 
severely by the middle income family where available sources 
of financial aid are less than adequate. The New York State 
Board of Regents has estimated that "two-thirds of the 
seniors of the State University of New York who are from 
families with annual incomes of $20,000 or less are in debt 
and facing the prospect of having to repay an average of 
$2535 in loans that they have borrowed to pay for their 
education." Seniors at private colleges with generally higher 
tuition and fees appear to be even further in debt. 

As indicated above, the emergence of financial aid as an 
important factor in a student's ability to attend college has 
resulted in a relatively new and specialized administrative 
position at most colleges called the financial aid office. 
Susquehanna, like most other colleges, has staff to work with 
students and their parents in arranging financing for college. 
About 40 percent of the students attending Susquehanna 
receive some form of financial aid. Since the University 
draws heavily from middle income families, over 150 of the 
incoming class of 400 will receive financial aid directly 
administered by the University and its Financial Aid Office. 
Many other students, of course, will be partially funding their 
education with supplemental money from other sources. 

The class graduated from Susquehanna in June 
represents a case in point. Ninety-eight members of this 



class received over $302,000 in University-administered fi- 
nancial aid during their four years on campus. Such aid con- 
sisted of funds directly' from the University allocated as out 
right grants or loans, f'lnds from endowment earmarked foi 
particular types of students or those in certain areas of study, 
work-study jobs, and the various other Federal programs 
administered by the University. 

If a student evidences sufficient need, the Financial Aid 
Office then attempts to put together a "package" involving a 
combination of grant, loan and work-study funds. It is critical 
that this mix be calculated carefully, so that the student is not 
overly burdened with loans which must be repaid for many 
years to come. During 1973-74, the University's financial aid 
office administered $1,100,000 in total financial aid funds. 

Students making application for financial aid are 
screened in a standardized manner from information supplied 
to the College Scholarship Service, a clearinghouse in 
Princeton, New Jersey. The amount of parental income is 
calculated along with the amount reasonably expected in 
support from the parents and from the student's summer 
earnings. The financial aid office must then match the 
student's remaining need with funds available here. 

In future years the role of financial aid will become even 
more acute as colleges and universities witness further cost 
increases. If financial aid can increase at least in proportion 
to costs, this gap or cost differential between the public and 
private institutions will not widen further. Additionally, the 
University can keep pace and continue to offer admission to 
students from all socio-economic backgrounds. Over the past 
three years, the amount of aid administered by Susquehanna 
University has increased by over 40 percent, thereby keeping 
pace with inflation. Our goal must be to be certain that this 
trend is maintained. 




Among those entering Susquehanna with the class 
ol 1978 were these sons and daughters of alumni, 
first row: Michael Herman I Max Herman x'57). 
Norristown, Pa.; Donna Wissinger (Donald '50 
and Flora Barnhart Wissinger '511. Hollidaysburg. 
Pa ; Kevin Spongier (Jacob Spongier '521. Lebanon. 
\ J ..- Lynn Marek (Gardiner Marek '511. Atlantic 
Highlands. N.J.: Ricky Koch (Andrew '50 and 
Maude Jones Koch '49), Leviltown. Pa. Second 
row C. Gilbert Zlock (Evan '49 and Frances 
Lvbarger /.lock '491. Leviltown. Pa.: Glenn 
Albert ( Walter '55 and Claire Rosengarten Albert 
x'56), Woodbury. N.J.; Lewis Morrow (William 
Morrow '34}. New Bloom field. Pa.; Robert Manning 
(Everett '50 and Jeanne Kahler Manning '501, 
Livingston. .V J .; Karen Hackman (Florence Stuber 
Hackman a'77). Selinsgrove. Third row: Peter 
Strickland (James Strickland x'45). Lewisburg. 
Pa.; Janet Heaton I Blair Healon '461. Selinsgrove; 
H illiam Poust III ( William Pousl Jr I. Camp Hill. 
Pa ; Lawrence Hutchison I David Hutchison '61 1. 
Cuyahoga Falls. Ohio Missing: William Bartle 
I Russell Bartle '521, Johnstown. Pa.; Susan 
Cederborg (Paul Cederborg x'47l. Endicoit. N. > . 
Paul S taller | Tom S taller '51 1. Mariton. N J. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



THE STUDENT BODY at Susquehanna is probably as 
good a cross-section of Middle America as one can imagine. 
Over 90 percent of the students come from Pennsylvania, 
New York and New Jersey, but the proportion of those from 
Pennsylvania has dropped from 70 percent to 52 percent over 
the past ten years. As shown by class ranks, our students 
achieved well in high school with about 80 percent graduating 
in the upper two-fifths of their classes. 

Student interest in broad curriculum areas has remained 
relatively stable in recent years. The number of students in 
liberal arts has remained stable at about 70 percent of the 
total student body. However, there has been a change in the 
distribution of majors within the liberal arts. While interest in 
chemistry and physics has remained about the same over the 
past four years, student interest in biology has increased 
significantly while that in geology has shown more modest 
advances. In non-science areas, accounting and the business 
program in general show greater interest, and communica- 
tions and theatre arts, religion and Spanish also have a 
greater proportion of students now than four years ago. 
Interest has declined in English, history, mathematics and 
most modern languages. While such trends are often incon- 
clusive and tend to be cyclical, they do provide some idea of 
the flexibility needed in higher education today to meet the 
demands of students. 

Student choices of career programs, of course, are often 
reflections of current trends at the national level and the 
availability of employment in the various fields. We find 
more interest in career-oriented areas of study, probably a 
result of a tight job market for liberal arts students and the 
knowledge that business majors are, at this point, more 
employable. The enrollment pictures at graduate schools, 
too, has influence on the course of study chosen by 
undergraduates. While total graduate school enrollments 
nationally increased by about 4 percent this past year, the 
growth rate in Ph.D.'s so evident during the 1960s has now 
been slowed by a deteriorating job market in many areas 
compounded by the Federal government's cutback in its 
fellowship programs. 

The University has recognized the need to place 
additional emphasis on career counseling and guidance. 
During the past year a career conference program was 
initiated in an effort to bring to the campus men and women 
to speak about employment and career opportunities in the 
various professions. This program will be expanded further in 
coming years so that students may be well apprised of such 
opportunities as they plan their academic programs. A major 
goal of the career conference idea is to influence the freshman 
and sophomore about opportunities available so that by the 
time of graduation they will have been able to choose courses 
and programs helpful to them. We believe in career guidance, 
but exercise caution in too-strongly advocating rigid career 
preparation. Susquehanna believes that a liberal arts 
education is a necessary base for living in and adjusting to 
modern society. As a result, career preparation is important 




for many students, but we will continue to present such 
opportunities within the framework of a liberal arts 
education. The important distinction here is the education of 
young men and women properly prepared to quickly adjust to 
the changes in modern society as opposed to preparing one for 
a particular job! 

The changing nature of the student personnel office is 
reflected in the individualistic needs and aspirations of the 
student body. As the University becomes more aware of the 
need to diversify its educational program, to offer more and 
varied off-campus study experiences for students, the role of 
student personnel becomes more that of counselor and 
facilitator. More time is taken in assisting the student to 
devise and meet personal educational objectives as opposed to 
the traditional role of "enforcement" of rules and 
regulations. As I have stated in the past, the maturity of 
today's undergraduate permits him to go further in designing 
or tailoring his own educational program and environment 
during the four years spent at Susquehanna. 



FALL 1974 



THE REPORT of the Middle States Association on the 
nature and condition of the University has pointed out that 
Susquehanna is, as indeed are most private colleges, at a 
crossroads. The report concludes that "Susquehanna has 
done little by way of systematic inquiry into its own 
functioning as a center of learning." A sense of urgency for 
self-renewal and a constant reappraisal of the curriculum 
must be emphasized. In interpreting the Middle States 
Report. I believe that Susquehanna is well-commended for 
the job done, but there is the caution that this may lead to a 
contentment which cannot be tolerated in higher education 
today. Recognition is given that the University "has risen 
markedly in its level of scholarship in terms of faculty 
credentials, publications, student research, computer 
capability and the like. It has recognized that inspired 
teaching at the undergraduate level requires fresh learning at 
the frontiers of knowledge, and the Board of Directors has 
been willing to put aside funds for support of research." It is 
all too easy to live on a reputation and easier yet to be fooled 
that this reputation can sustain the University in future years. 
1 n the development of curricular patterns which continue 
to attract students, there is always the urge of opting for those 
emphasizing occupationalism, since current student patterns 
lean strongly in this direction. The danger here is in seriously 
eroding the liberal arts base which has been nurtured by 
Susquehanna. At the same time, there would seem to be a 
comparable danger in relying solely on a classical curriculum 
in the liberal arts which, in turn, may no longer attract the 
necessary number of students to the campus. Dean Reuning 
has recognized the need for change, but with continuity. 

If funds are to be attracted and other new sources of 
revenue uncovered, the University must recognize the 
changing nature of higher education and the aspirations and 
life styles of potential students. Future support will be in 
direct proportion to distinctiveness and program validity and 
will no longer be predicated only on the strength of traditional 
modes of study. The Ford Foundation, in its recent Venture 
Fund Program, selected those institutions which have 
demonstrated an ability for "institutional openness, a 
willingness to experiment, and a desire and capacity to try 
new things in new ways." 

Susquehanna is making a good start in this direction. The 
inception of the 3-3 curriculum, now in its fourth year, pro- 
vides greater flexibility in programming and should assist us 
in modernizing the curriculum. The evolution of practicums, 
internships and other educational experiences which move the 
learning process from the classroom into the real world and 
provide students with opportunities to apply the theory 
taught in the classroom have brought a whole new dimension 
to the educational process. The theory here is that much of 
what a students needs to know can be taught in the classroom, 
but the extension, interpretation and application of this 
knowledge must be pursued in the much broader context of 
liberal education and society. Emphasis will be placed on 
broadening the sometimes rigid discipline-related frame of 



reference and encourage the steady and systematic 
development of the powers of inquiry-Judgment, deliberation 
and communication in a comprehensive context more 
appropriate to the nature of liberal education. More cross- 
disciplinary courses and team-taught sessions will be stressed. 
As the student becomes more active in formulating his own 
educational experience, the role of the teacher becomes more 
that of a participant and facilitator rather than one who 
monopolizes what is often a one-way dialog with his students. 
The faculty member is clearly the key to any changes which 
take place on campus. Traditionally, the teacher-scholar has 
been one who has conveyed to others information about his 
discipline while, at the same time, contributing personally to 
the advancement of knowledge. As the student becomes more 
active in the learning process and assumes a greater role in 
organizing his schedule, the role of teacher may be altered to 
that of "coordinator." "facilitator," or "co-learner." 
Learning situations increase in frequency which take the 
instructor and student away from the traditional lecture room 
atmosphere and controlled situations. Retraining faculty and 
staff to cope with this new and exciting learning environment 
will have to be provided for. Like most changes in education, 
alterations in the learning atmosphere should be gradual and 
have provisions for constant evaluation and critique. 

Another major trend which we see coming relates to the 
concept of regionalization and interinstitutional cooperation 
among colleges within a given area. Informal meetings are 
now regularly held with Bucknell, Lycoming and other 
neighboring institutions to determine how cooperation can be 
enhanced. While fiscal concerns no doubt stimulated interest 
in such cooperation, another real advantage is combining the 
strengths of the neighboring colleges in providing a better 
educational product. It is still too early to determine the likely 
chances of success for such ventures since institutional 
autonomy and bureaucratic barriers tend to negate rapid 
progress. There is no doubt, however, that cooperation makes 
sense and can be accomplished in such a way so that each 
institution retains its own identity yet benefits from the 
relationship through cross enrollments of students, exchanges 
of faculty, and the elimination of certain duplicate facilities 
and courses on neighboring campuses. What has been 
accomplished already has been modest but significant: an 
interlibrary loan program with regional colleges and 
universities; an annual joint venture by the English and 
modern language departments at Bucknell and Susquehanna 
in sponsoring a Humanities Colloquium; the enrolling of 
Susquehanna students at Bucknell in astronomy and physics 
courses; an agreement among a number of colleges and 
universities in Central Pennsylvania to initiate joint programs 
in rural studies and an internship experience at the 
Selinsgrove State School. 

In addition to responding to the needs of the 1400 full- 
time students on the campus, the University continues its 
active interest and involvement in the affairs of the region. 
The Evening Program for Adults provides educational 
opportunities to a growing number. During 1973-74, the 
enrollment rose to about 180. More than 20 courses were 
offered, both for credit and non-credit. Certificate programs 
for supervisors are now offered in management and for 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




President Weber looks at Susquehanna's very first 
associate degree diploma with its recipient. Carey N. 
Sheaffer of Selinsgrove. With some previously-earned 
credits, he met the requirements and was conferred with the 
associate in applied science I business administration) 
at Opening Convocation — only a year after the program was 
offered. Sheaffer is a computer operations supervisor 
for the Tri-County National Bank in Middleburg. 



professional and para-professional personnel in community 
mental health. This extra dimension to the regular academic 
program provides both a more efficient use of University 
facilities and personnel and recognition of the broadened role 
of the institution in serving the expanding educational needs 
of our region. Similarly, a two-year Associate Degree 
Program, initiated last fall, will enroll about 50 students this 
coming year. Offering two degrees, an associate degree in the 
Arts and in Applied Science (business administration), this 
program fills a void for the post-secondary student wishing to 
pursue further study. Eventually, we hope that the Associate 
Degree Program will filter some students into the regular 
four-year program of the University. 

The flexibility of the two year PACE program (Program 
in Adult Continuing Education) is designed for those who 
wish to gain an associate degree by combining work and 
evening study. Admission is open to all and is not based on 
previous academic performance alone, but on aptitude and a 
desire to learn. As modern society places additional emphasis 
on life-long learning, either for career development or for 
personal satisfaction, the role of both the Evening and PACE 
programs will become more important. 

The Middle States Report speaks to the growing posture 
of the faculty on campus. Our teachers are regarded as 
competent scholars, well versed in their disciplines. The 
achievements of the faculty continue to be a source of 
strength for the University. I am pleased to relate below some 
of the more worthy accomplishments of this group of 



dedicated persons over the past academic year. It should be 
noted that much of the attention of the campus during 1973- 

74 was necessarily directed toward an all-consuming self- 
study in preparation for the Middle States visit in January. 
This involved extensive committee and sub-committee 
assignments for almost all faculty and staff. As a result, the 
personal and professional accomplishments during this time 
of added stress and activity are even more noteworthy. 

Faculty promotions effective with the start of the 1974- 

75 academic year include, to full professor: Dr. Robert L. 
Bradford, political science; Dr. Charles E. Lyle, psychology; 
Dr. David E. Horlacher, economics; Dr. Elizabeth Wiley, 
English. To associate professor: Dr. Donald D. Housley, 
history; Dr. Robert G. Mowry, Spanish. To assistant 
professor. Dr. Thomas F. Livernois, religion. 

Dr. Neil H. Potter, associate professor of chemistry, will 
be on sabbatical leave for the coming academic year and will 
teach at Tsai Chung University in Taiwan. David J. 
Oscarson, assistant professor of business administration, has 
been granted a leave of absence to begin full-time doctoral 
studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Carol J. Harrison, 
assistant professor of mathematical sciences, was also 
granted a sabbatical leave for the full 1974-75 academic year 
while Dr. Housley, Dr. Marjorie W. McCune, associate 
professor of English, and Richard Kamber, assistant profes- 
sor of philosophy, were granted sabbatical leaves for one 
term each during the forthcoming year. 

The University regrets the departure, for various 
reasons, of faculty and staff who have been associated with 
our educational development. Carl A. Haaland, instructor in 
communications and media, left Susquehanna at the end of 
the second term to take a position with the Piper Aircraft 
Corporation in Lock Haven. Gayle D. Confer, instructor in 
physical education and assistant football coach, also resigned 
effective March 1 to enter the world of business. Candace R. 
Herb has resigned her position as assistant professor of 
English to accept a position at Hood College in Frederick, 
Maryland. Judy A. Hansen, instructor in music, resigned to 
pursue her professional career in voice in New York City, 
while Ann L Cooper, instructor in physical education, has 
resigned her position effective July 1. Fredrica H. 
Stringfellow, instructor in physical education, has tendered 
her resignation to accept a position with the American 
Institute of Mental Studies in Vineland, New Jersey. 

New full-time faculty members joining the University 
for the coming year include: Harriet Moran Couch, 
instructor in music; Connie Nipple Delbaugh and Rose Ann 
Neff, instructors in physical education; Deane O. Runyon, 
instructor in communication and director of the Educational 
Media Center; William R. Frey, instructor in physical 
education and coach. Dr. Edwin M. Van Dam will be assis- 
tant professor of chemistry during Dr. Potter's leave and 
Robert L. Laud, instructor in business administration dur- 
ing Mr. Oscarson's leave. Robert H. Muirhead joins the 
coaching staff. 

Since my last report, Joel G. Clemmer became reference 
librarian upon the retirement in mid-year of Mrs. Dorothy 
Shaulis. 

I am pleased to report the progress of certain members 



FALL 1974 



11 






£>J 



of the faculty who completed work on their doctorates. David 
E. Horlacher, professor of economics, was awarded his 
doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. W. Murray 
Hunt, assistant professor of philosophy, received his Ph.D. 
degree from Indiana University and Thomas F. Livernois, 
assistant professor of religion, was conferred with the doctor 
of sacred theology degree by the Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

The involvement of faculty and staff in personal and 
professional advancement continues to grow. The 1974 issue 
of Susquehanna University Studies, our 38-year-old 
academic journal, contains five papers written by University 
faculty members: "A Puppet Looks at His Queen" by 
Llizabeth Wiley, professor of English; "Georg Biichner's 
Damons Tod: Dramatic Structure and Individual Neces- 
sity" by Peter B. Waldeck, associate professor of German; 
"The Creative Solution in Nausea" by Richard Kamber, as- 
sistant professor of philosophy; "Floods, Urbanization, and 
the Tyranny of Small Decisions" by Frank W. Fletcher, pro- 
lessor of geology, and Vicki L. Freeman '74, student re- 
search assistant; "The Development of Welfare and Relief in 
Snyder County, Pennsylvania, During the I930's: A Case 
Study of the Modernization Process" by Donald D. 
Housley, associate professor of history. 

Nine members of the music faculty gave on-campus 
recitals during the past year and three members of the 
Department's faculty — David A. Boltz, James B. Steffy and 
( yril M. Stretansky — conducted secondary school musical 



groups at district or state gatherings. Mr. Steffy, Department 
head, was also festival director for the Oaxtepec Internation- 
al Festival of Music in Mexico, served in a similar capacity 
in Coventry, England, and was a musical adjudicator for the 
Festival of Nations in Washington. D. C. In December and 
April, Mr. Stretansky was festival director for the Rome 
Choral Festival in Italy. Donald W. Beckie, assistant 
professor of music, was again appointed to the faculty for the 
Governor's School for the Arts and John P. Magnus, 
associate professor, received a summer faculty appointment 
to the American Institute of Musical Studies in Graz, 
Austria. Also, Dr. James L. Boeringer, University organist, 
accepted an appointment to the faculty of the Church Music 
Workshop at Lake George, under the sponsorship of the 
Journal of Church Music. 

Dr. Horlacher served as consultant to the program in 
Computer Based Population Education at the University of 
Illinois, to the Government Affairs Institute in Washington, 
D.C., and to the Airlie Foundation for International 
Education in Virginia. He was also a discussant for two 
papers on population and economic development at the 
annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. At 
present. Dr. Horlacher is chairman of the Population Panel 
of the Southeast Asia Development Advisory Group. 

In addition to the very creditable achievement of gaining 
accreditation for its program from the American Chemical 
Society, the Chemistry Department continues its varied 
interests in the field, including a prominent role in events 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



commemorating the discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley, 
a former resident of Northumberland, Pennsylvania. Dr. 
Gynith Giffin, Department head, completed two publica- 
tions, "A Brief Study of Nuclear Reactor Accidents" and 
"Some Heavy Metals in the 1972 MS DGC Fulton County 
Corn Crop." 

Dr. Fletcher continues as chairman of the University's 
Institute For Environmental Studies and testified before 
several state government committees on land use and solid 
waste disposal. In addition to his paper in Susquehanna 
University Studies, a second article, "Paleogeography and 
Paleoclimates at the Disposition Sites of the Catskill Facies 
(Late Devonian)" appeared in the September 1974 edition of 
Geological Society of America Bulletin. Dr. Richard H. 
Lowright, assistant professor of geology, published two 
papers during the year in Journal of Sedimentary Petrology: 
"An Analysis of Factors Controlling Deviations in Hydraulic 
Equivalence in Some Modern Sands," "Environmental 
Determination Using Hydraulic Equivalence Studies." 

Margaret E. Rogers, assistant professor of mathemati- 
cal sciences, presented a paper on individualized instruction 
in linear algebra at a national conference in Washington, 
D.C., and submitted and had accepted a paper on male 
orientation of mathematics texts by Mathematics Teacher. 
Dr. Robert L. Tyler, assistant professor in the same 
department, has prepared a paper on ring theory for the 
Canadian Journal of Mathematics. 

Dr. Marjorie McCune continues to serve the University 
as chairman of the editorial board of Susquehanna Univer- 
sity Studies and as chairman of the Susquehanna-Bucknell 
Humanities Coloquium. She also published abstracts on 
American literary studies in 1 7th Century News. Dr. Eliza- 
beth Wiley read a paper entitled, "Dickens's Use of London 
in Oliver Twist" to the Pittsburgh Dickens Fellowship. Ron- 
ald L. Dotterer, instructor in English, presented a paper en- 
titled "Illusory Form in Wallace Stevens, The Comedian on 
the Letter G" at the Northeastern Modern Language Asso- 
ciation Conference. Dr. Lawrence A. Abler, professor of 
English, presented a paper at the Humanities Colloquium 
entitled "From Angel to Orpheus: Myth-Poetics in Late 
Rilke." Other Colloquium papers included one on Hamlet 
by Dr. Nancy A. Cairns, associate professor of French, and 
Mr. Dotterer. 

Members of the Department of Modern Languages were 
also engaged in serious scholarly activity. Both Dr. Lucia S. 
Kegler and Dr. Robert G. Mowery, associate professors, are 
writing or revising language textbooks, while Dr. Cairns and 
Dr. Peter B. Waldeck, Department head, are working on 
monographs for future publication. 

Larry D. Augustine, associate professor of speech, spent 
the summer as a manager in a professional theatre in 
Maryville, Tennessee. 

While much of the research involvement in psychology 
and sociology remains closely tied to the internships and 
practicums so important to student growth and development, 
several additional items are worthy of note. Dr. LeRoy H. 
Pelton, assistant professor of psychology, has completed 
corrections on his book The Psychology of Non-Violence. 
Dr. Philip C. Bossart, professor and head of the Psychology 



Department, has been granted his license by the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania as a practicing psychologist. Dr. 
James R. Misanin, associate professor of psychology, and 
his associates contributed papers during the past year to 
Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology and 
Development Psychobiology. William J. Seaton, instructor 
in sociology, continues his role as an editorial assistant for 
Popular Music in Society and serves as director of a drug 
abuse and alcohol study program sponsored by the Mental 
Health/Mental Retardation unit in a four-county region in 
Central Pennsylvania. Dr. Charles J. Igoe, associate profes- 
sor of education, read a paper at the conference of the Na- 
tional Student Volunteer Program held at the University of 
Chicago entitled "Motivation and Recruitment for Experi- 
ential Learning Program," contributed two chapters to a 
book entitled Experiential Learning, and also serves on the 
Governor's Council on Aging and is consultant to the 
National Student Volunteer Program, a branch of ACTION. 
Dr. Robert A. Bastress, head of the Education Department, 
completed a manual on "The Design of Instruction" for the 
University's methods courses. 

Dr. Robert L. Bradford, professor of political science, 
participated in the United States State Department's 
Scholar-Diplomat Seminar in Washington, D.C., and has 
been appointed to a new Advisory Committee on South-West 
Africa created by the Lutheran Council in the U.S.A. Gene 
R. Urey, assistant professor of political science, reviewed J. 
Keith Melvill's manuscript entitled "The American 
Democratic System" and serves by appointment on the 
Governor's Trial Court Commission in Pennsylvania. 

Richard Kamber, assistant professor of philosophy, was 
awarded a summer grant from the National Endowment for 
the Humanities on the subject "Quarrel Between Poetry and 
Philosophy." Dr. Livernois abstracted for the Journal of 
Ecumenical Studies and Boyd Gibson, assistant professor of 
religion, reviewed a book for Christian Century, participated 
in a Jewish-Christian Dialog at Haverford, Pennsylvania, 
and serves as part-time counselor for Tressler-Lutheran 
Associates and a new family counseling service set up on the 
campus during the past year. 

In order to assist faculty members to pursue their 
professional interests, the University again made available a 
series of summer research grants of up to $1000 each. 
Awards this year were presented to Dr. Boeringer, Mr. 
Dotterer. John E. Fries, Dr. Charles E. Lyle and Dr. 
Frederick D. Ullman. 

Grants in progress during the year for special projects 
included: the second year of a $226,000 grant from the 
National Science Foundation to fund the work of the 
University's Institute For Environmental Studies; the second 
year of a $10,000 grant to Dr. Otto Reimherr, head of the 
Religion and Philosophy Department, for the development of 
an Institute for Studies in Parish Ministry; the continuation 
of a $15,000 grant to Mr. Seaton in sociology for further 
development of a drug and alcohol abuse study funded by the 
Governor's Council; grants of $2500 each from the North- 
umberland and Danville units of Mental Health/Mental 
Retardation for the development of a certificate program in 
community mental health in the Evening Program. 



FALL 1974 



13 



development 
/finances 

COLLEGE COSTS have risen nationally between 30 and 40 
percent over the past four years. While Susquehanna's costs 
still rank favorably with competing colleges and universities, 
it is little comfort to the parents of our students who pay 
S3500 per year for tuition, room and board, and fees. We 
spend considerable time discussing how this University can 
maintain its diversified student population during times when 
double digit inflation rages across the country. A broad 
financial aid plan has helped, but even the $1 million-plus 
administered by the Financial Aid Office will need to be 
supplemented with other sources in future years if 
Susquehanna is to remain within the reach of the average 
family. It is conceivable that over the next three years the 
number of students seeking financial aid will increase from 40 
to 50 percent, particularly if real income continues to lose its 
race with inflation. 

Sixty-two percent of the University's budget of over $5 
million is derived from tuition and fees. This figure is about 
average or slightly above that of competing colleges. The one 
percent of our income generated from endowment ranks 
Susquehanna well below many colleges. Historically, we have 
had little endowment — currently under $2 million — and it is 
income from endowment channeled into the operating budget 



that helps us expand programs and balance budgets. Indeed, 
major emphasis must be placed on generating new sources of 
endowment funds over the next decade. Since well over two- 
thirds of all endowment comes from bequests and other forms 
of deferred gifts, the University has initiated an active 
program to encourage its alumni and friends to help provide 
for the University in their estate plans. We are pleased to have 
the help of D. Edgar Hutchison, Class of 1934, serving us 
part-time and assisting in the area of deferred giving. 

One area which gives satisfaction to us all is the manner 
in which alumni and others have supported the needs of the 
University in recent years. The pages which follow provide 
testimony of this support, and I earnestly convey the thanks 
of Susquehanna for this show of confidence in the University 
and its future. Between 7 and 9 percent of the University's 
income comes from gifts and grants, and this figure is 
somewhat higher than a corresponding figure for many other 
colleges. Twenty-five percent of our alumni make donations 
annually, but we must achieve a 35-40 percent rate of 
participation in future years if we are to keep pace. The 
annual giving program, the Susquehanna University Fund, 
exceeded its goal of $150,000 for 1973-74. A more 
challenging goal for the coming year will provide incentive to 
us all to improve this record. Overall, the University received 
$837,344 in gifts and grants during the 1973-74 year, the 
second best year in history. 

I am pleased to report that the operating budget of $5 
million for the year ending June 30, 1974 was, once again, in 




TV studio — one of the new educational media facilities in the Hlough Learning Center. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SCHEDULE OF CURRENT INCOME 



$5,000,000 
$4,500,000 
$4,000,000 
$3,500,000 
$3,000,000 

$2,500,000 
$2,000,000 
$1,500,000 
$1,000,000 



o 
o 
o 



o 

o 

. o . 

o" 

CD 



O 
O 
O 

O 

CD 
C\J ■ 

C\J 



o 
o 
o 
o" 

C\J 

cm" 



o 
o 
o 

CO" 

■ -3- ' 
c\f 



o 
o 
o 

CO 

co 
cm' 



o 
o 
o 

co • 

CD 

co" 



o 
o 
o 

r--' 
o 



o 
o 
o 

•«t" 



. o 
o 
o 

o" 
o 

■ r-~ 

■*" 



o 
o 



o 
o 
o 

LO 



o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
co ■ 

LO 



CO 













1963-64 1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72 1972-73 1973-74 1974-75 



BUDGET ITEMS AS 
PERCENTAGES 
OF TOTAL 
CURRENT INCOME 


1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


1970-71 


1971-72 


1972-73 


1973-74 


STUDENT FEES 


57 


59 


59 


60 


61 


62 


60 


62 


INVESTMENT INCOME 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


GIFTS & GRANTS 


5 


4 


4 


6 


7 


5 


9 


8 


OTHER 


1 












2 


2 


TOTAL EDUC. & GENERAL 


65 


65 


65 


68 


69 


68 


72 


73 


AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES 


35 


35 


35 


32 


31 


32 


28 


27 


TOTAL CURRENT INCOME 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 



FALL 1974 



15 



GIFTS FROM ALUMNI TO SUSQUEHANNA 



$180,000 

$170,000 

$160,000 

$150,000 

$140,000 

$130,000 

$120,000 

$110,000 

$100,000 

$90,000 

$80,000 

$70,000 

$60,000 

$50,000 

$40,000 



$180,500 



$166,000 $167,000. 



$133,000 



$87,000 



S62.000 



$43,000 

1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72 



1972-73 1973-74 



TOTAL AMOUNT OF GIFTS AND GRANTS 



$1,000,000 

$900,000 

$800,000 

$700,000 

$600,000 

$500,000 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 
$100,000 



$550,500 



: 



.$889,509 



$834,304 




$632,976 



■$565,500" 



$564,000 









1967-68 1968-69 



1969-70 



1970-71 



1971-72 



1972-73 



1973-74 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



balance. Budgetary pressures have been met with judicious 
management on the part of the Business Office in eliminating 
non-essential expenditures without impairment of the 
educational program. As stated elsewhere, tuition and fees 
increased by only 5 percent for the next year, even though all 
costs to the University in general rose by over 9 percent. 
Based on an anticipated enrollment of 1400 again for 1974- 
75, operating income of the University should approximate 
total expenditures. 

A major goal of our long-range planning has been to 
implement a priority program to raise faculty salaries to 
competitive levels. This was begun last year and will carry 
forward to 1974-75. Since teaching is Susquehanna's major 
asset, emphasis on this area was considered essential. It is 
encouraging to report that the average compensation for the 
full professor at Susquehanna is now $18,800, about in the 
middle of the range for similar positions at competing 
colleges in Pennsylvania. With another major step to be taken 
in this regard during the coming year, we feel that the 
Susquehanna professor is now more adequately rewarded 
for his efforts and our ranking will be enhanced even further. 
In future years, considerable attention will need to be fo- 
cused on the lower levels, the ranks of instructor and assis- 
tant professor, where S.U. is not now as competitive as we 
would like it to be. 

A highlight of the year just concluded was the dedication 
of the Roger M. Blough Learning Center on January 19, 
1974. This expanded library facility provides Susquehanna 
with a first-rate library, additional seminar rooms, an 
educational media center, an environmental studies area, and 
music listening rooms. The stack capacity of the building was 
increased to 200,000 volumes and there are 400 individual 
study stations on the three levels. The building and alterations 
cost $1,240,000. Everyone who assisted with the project can 
be proud of the end result! 

On that same day the University formally opened the 
new Susquehanna-Burroughs Computer Center in the 
Campus Center. The acquisition of a new Burroughs 5500 
computer gives Susquehanna a capability to further develop 
its curriculum in computer science and allied areas and to 
adequately serve the University in a support role. While 
about 70 percent of the computer work is now administrative 
in nature, it is estimated that the majority of our students 
utilize the computer at one time or another during their stay 
at Susquehanna. The role of the computer in the educational 
process cannot be disputed. We are fortunate to have such a 
fine facility available to students, faculty and staff on our 
campus. 

Funds provided by the National Science Foundation, 
local business and industry, and the University will make it 
possible to erect a new research building on campus adjacent 
to the minidorm, behind the Spitzner Communication 
Center. The growth of student and student-related research 
has become an integral part of the academic program. En- 
couraged by the high caliber of research work performed by 
students in the sciences in conjunction with the Institute For 
Environmental Studies, the University has appropriated 
$35,000 for this facility. Modest in design, the building will be 
used only for research and will be available to the growing 



number of students conducting independent research or 
working with faculty on summer projects. The building 
should be completed by November 1 of this year. 

A major step has been taken by the Board of Directors 
toward satisfying the final remaining physical need of the 
University. An appropriation of $10,000 has been used to 
conduct a feasibility study for a physical education center. 
The architects, Campbell, Rea, Hayes & Large of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania, have determined that it is economically and 
aesthetically feasible to add to the present Alumni 
Gymnasium. To be presented to the Board in October is a 
final preliminary plan to erect a new gymnasium as a wing to 
the north of the present building with seating for at least 1 500 
and with new locker and auxiliary rooms underneath. To the 
east of the present building will be a wing housing a swimming 
pool with six lanes for competition and spectator space for 
600. The present gym will be completely renovated and used 
for physical education, classes and additional locker rooms. 
It is estimated that the project cost will exceed $2 million, but 
the Board recognizes the vital importance of this facility. 
Should Board approval be forthcoming, it is conceivable that 
construction could begin within a year. 

A large portion of our time during the next year will be 
devoted to interpretation of the Middle States data and 
formulating a long-range plan for the University. We must 
further clarify our aims and objectives, build a concise 
statement of need, and move forward with a capital campaign 
which will allow the alumni and friends of Susquehanna to 
share in our vision for the future. Tentative plans call for a 
major capital campaign beginning in late 1975 and 1976 to 
kick off the development program for the next decade. 



IN CONCLUSION 

THERE IS GREAT satisfaction in having completed 
another academic year on May 25, 1974 by conferring 301 
seniors with the baccalaureate degree and welcoming them 
into the Alumni Association of Susquehanna University. 
The ceremony was highlighted by a commencement address 
by Senator Mark O. Hatfield of Oregon, who was awarded 
the degree of Doctor of Public Administration; and by the 
baccalaureate sermon of the Rev. J. Stephen Bremer, for- 
mer S.U. chaplain and now pastor of Luther Memorial 
Church, Madison, Wisconsin. Pastor Bremer, the Rev. Dale 
S. Bringman '48 and the Rev. Daniel H. Standstedt of the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg were awarded 
Doctor of Divinity degrees. 

The continuing importance of the Church in the 
activities of the University cannot be overlooked. The 
development of a covenant document has been the work of 
many people and has resulted in what is becoming an even 
more meaningful relationship between the Central 
Pennsylvania Synod and Susquehanna. We welcome this 
strength, both as a source of financial stability and. just as 
importantly, as a source of moral direction. 

Several administrative appointments have been made 
for the new academic year. Wendy McMahan and Susan 



FALL 1974 



17 




Payne Staggers join the admissions staff, thus increasing its 
total to four. Miss McMahan is a graduate of Franklin and 
Marshall College and served as an editorial assistant with 
Guidance Associates of Pleasantville, New York, before 
coming to Susquehanna. Mrs. Staggers is a graduate of 
Wake Forest College and has taught social studies in both 
junior and senior high school. Margaret C. Weirick resigned 
from the admissions staff in mid-year to accept a position at 
Temple University. 

Lourene Maurer becomes the University's new 
coordinator of residence affairs, replacing Dorothy French 
Avery. Miss Maurer has a master's degree in education from 
Bucknell University and has previous experience as a 
teacher in the Milton, Pennsylvania, schools. 

At mid-year the University appointed Peter B. Silvestri 
as director of public information. He replaces Ronald 
Berkheimer who moved to a similar position at Juniata 
College. Silvestri is a graduate of Amherst College, earned 
his master's at Trinity College, and most recently was a 
bureau chief for The Hartford Times of Connecticut. 

James M. Rising, director of physical plant, resigned in 
mid-year and was replaced by his former assistant, Jon R. 
Haviland. William R. Aikey of Milton, Pennsylvania, 
assumed the position of assistant director. 

The Board of Directors elected Harry W. Butts Jr. '48, 
Philadelphia regional manager for the Burroughs Cor- 
poration, and John A. Carpenter, a Sunbury attorney, to five- 
year terms on the Board. In addition, the Alumni Association 
elected Samuel D. Ross '54, vice president for administrative 
services of Pennsylvania Blue Shield and a resident of 
Carlisle, as an alumni representative to the Board. Donald H. 
Foelsch '53, a Williamsport chemist, was elected as synodical 
representative to the Board as was the Rev. David N. Finney, 



pastor of the Trinity Lutheran Church in Johnstown, who 
thereby begins a second five-year term. 

Mrs. Kimball D. Miller completed her five-year 
appointment to the Board as a synod representative and, for 
personal reasons, chose not to be renominated. 

The growth and development of the University are the 
result of the work of many — faculty, staff. Board members, 
alumni and friends. I have attempted to convey to the reader 
in my last several reports that the structure of higher 
education is changing and that Susquehanna must change to 
meet the new demands of its students and society. Preparing 
students for life in the latter part of the tw entieth century will 
require mew methodologies and an added emphasis on 
societal concerns. The role of the church-related college 
becomes increasingly important in reinforcing and reaffirm- 
ing the moral fiber which, temporarily, has been emasculated 
and abused. Today's young people have a social conscience, 
and this speaks well for the quality of future leadership 
coming from the nation's campuses. It is the liberal arts 
education which serves as a legitimate base for the 
democratic system. An understanding of the thought 
processes, an ability to think analytically, and a respect for 
reason must continue to form the base for education. 
Susquehanna will continue to respect this view and, as stated 
earlier, give it broader perspective through a variety of new 
educational opportunities. Students will be challenged to 
undertake real life experiences and to apply their base of 
knowledge to societal problems. 

The introduction of new programs and new methodolo- 
gies will, in some respects, change the face of the University. 
The basic purpose of a Susquehanna education, however, is 
the education of the total individual. This worthy goal has not 
changed over the years, nor will it change in the future. 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 

(Alumni and friends contributing $100 or more to 

The Susquehanna University Fund 

during the period July 1, 1973 through June 30, 1974) 



Myrl E. Alexander hc'72 

Dorothy M. Anderson '62 

John A. Apple hc'64 

John B. Apple 

Douglas E. Arthur '49 

Arch A- '20 & Katharine Heldt Aucker '44 

John M. Auten '28 

William P. '39 & Hester Bittinger Ayers '40 

Donald Babies '50 

Nelson E. Bailey '57 

Robert M. Bastress 39 

John H. Baum hc'71 

Elmer R. Baumgardner '52 

Augusta A. Bean 

Norman R. Benner '25 

Earl L. Bernstine '50 

Frederic C. Billman '36 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Bishop '30 

John W. Bittinger '23 

Roger M. Blough '25 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Vernon Blough '31 

Herbert G. Boettger Jr. '66 

Marsh C. Bogar '51 

Philip C. Bossart h'57 

Grace C. Boyle '33 

F. William Brandt 

J. Stephen Bremer hc74 

Mabel Steften Broscious '21 

Edgar S. Brown Jr. 

William R. Burchfield 

Dr. & Mrs. Leonard F. Bush hc70 

Robert I. & Carol Royer Caddell '59 

Russell Carmichael '34 

Alvin W. Carpenter '24 

Charles H. '52 & Voylet Dietz Carr '52 

Henry H. Cassler '34 

Charles E. '27 & 

Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee "28 
Jack E. Cisney "59 
Samuel D. Clapper '68 
James R. '46 & Mary Jane Rudy Clark x'44 
Mr. & Mrs. Bryce C. Cochran 
Sidney Cohn 

Martha Laudenslager Davis '31 
Sue C. Davis '66 
Charles B. Degenstein 
Howard E. DeMott h'54 
Marion D. Drumheller '57 
Lewis R. Drumm Sr. '25 
William N. Duck '11 
Mr. & Mrs. Milton C. Dumeyer 
Phyllis S. Ellis 

Martin M. '25 & Elsie Nace Enders '27 
Roland A. Erlckson hc'70 
Donald H. & Margaret Snyder Ernst '65 
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Esser 
Samuel H. Evert 
H. R. Fenstermacher '32 
Marlyn R. '23 & Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf 24 
Lawrence C. Fisher '31 
Shelton Fisher hc'68 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Flackman 
Kenneth O. Fladmark h'68 
A.N. & Ida Olmstead Fredrickson '21 
Walter B. Freed 
Ruth Pace Fuellhart '29 
Ivars & Nora Steinhards Galins '54 
James C. '50 & Martha Martin Gehris "51 
Ralph C. Geigle '35 
Laird S. Gemberling '33 
Stephen C. Gettier 63 
Dr. & Mrs. Euell T. Gibbons hc'72 
Boyd Gibson 
Gynith C. Giffin h'68 
Joyce K. Gilbert '54 
Russell W. Gilbert h'37 
Robert C. Goetze 
Wallace E. Gordon '54 
James J. '55 & Elsie Gruber Gormley '56 
Donald M. Gray '60 
W. David Gross '47 
Delsey Morris Gross '27 
Ira C. Gross '15 
Fred A. Grosse h'67 
Wallace J. Growney 
Robert G. Gundaker '64 



Melvin E. Haas '42 

Harry H. Haddon hc'63 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Haines '31 

Arnold C. & Mary Jane Jessen Hansen '49 

Lulu Fetterolf Harman '18 

Herbert H. & Laura Arnold Hart '27 

Donald L Hartman 56 

Harold E. & Jeanne Attinger Hassinger x'51 

Robert A. Heinbach 

John C x'43 & Jeanne Fenner Helm *42 

Phoebe Herman '17 

Robert L. Herr '39 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Hess 

David E. Horlacher 

Orlando W. Houts 

D Edgar '34 & 

Aberdeen Phillips Hutchison '34 
Larry M. '43 & Louise Kresge Isaacs '45 
Emily McElwee Jamison '27 
Charles G. Jones '35 
David S. Kammerer '16 
Hilda Karniol h'64 
Lester J Karschner '37 
Henry J. '39 & Betty Johnston Keil '38 
Fred W. & Esther Yingling Kern '38 
John F. Kindsvatter '32 
Harry L. & Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel '28 
Joe W. Klelnbauer '63 
Raymond W. '24 & Anna Brosious 

Klinedlnst *27 
John B. Kniseley '13 
Ruth Bergstresser Koch '34 
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Krahmer h'67 
R. Lynn & Rose Gumbert Krape '29 
Eleanor Robison Landes h'60 
William L. S. Landes III 71 
Nevin & Florence Rothermel Latsha '40 
W. Frank 39 & Isabel Tewkesbury 

Laudenslayer '39 
Norman H. Lauer '62 
Herbert C. Lauver 38 
Ellis K. Lecrone '21 
Richard C. Lelb 
Alice Patterson Leidel '58 
Clay L. Lorah '57 
Charles R. Loss '40 
Paul B. Lucas '28 
Elwood M. McAllister '49 
John C. '37 & Marjorie Wolfe McCune '43 
Thomas F. McGrath h'69 
Stephen J. Martinec '35 
Robert C. Mickatavage '54 
James R. '60 & 

Jean Ewald Middleswarth '62 
Jack A. & Rebecca Shade Mignot 54 
Wayne W Miller '65 
Mary Weimer Moffitt '28 
Maude Reichley Moist x'02 
Charles A. Morris '49 
William S. Morrow '34 
Carl M. Moyer '63 
Mr. & Mrs. Myer R. Musser '30 
William L. Nicholls "25 
William E. Nye '40 
Paul D. Ochenrider '39 
Douglas A. Portzline '41 
Robert W. Pritchard '36 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Pruitt 
Joseph L. Ray h'67 
Mr. & Mrs. John S. Redpath 
Robert U. Redpath Jr. 
Richard A. Reiland 
Otto Reimherr h'67 
Beatrice Rettinger '23 
Harold H Reuning 

Simon B '30 & Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads x'34 
Edward R Rhodes '57 
Harry M. Rice '15 
Kermit R. Ritter '60 
William O- Roberts '29 
Edward S. '42 & Blanche Forney Rogers '42 
Samuel D. '54 & Dorothy Apgar Ross '53 
Allen H. Roth 
Bryan C- Rothfuss '23 
Henry W Rozenberg hc'73 
William R. Ruhl '49 



ONCE AGAIN the University would like to use this means of ex- 
pressing its appreciation to all those who supported its various 
programs during the past fiscal year. The period covered by this 
report is July 1, 1973 through June 30, 1974. Only contributions 
received during the year are included here. Pledges to the various 
University programs are not included, but payments made on such 
pledges are acknowledged. One asterisk denotes a gift of $100 or 
more; two asterisks, $500 or more. A dagger after the name 
indicates that a matching gift was received from the donor's 
employer. A separate listing of University Associates, those giving 
$100 or more to annual giving — The Susquehanna University 
Fund — is included at the beginning of the donor's section. The 
following list is intended to be comprehensive of all donors to the 
University but, should there be omissions, we ask that they be 
brought to the attention of the University. 



GIFTS AND GRANTS 

Sources of Support 

Alumni 

Parents, Friends 
Corporations, 
Foundations 
Church 
Bequests 
Other 

Total 



1 970-71 1 971-72 1 972-73 1 973-74 

$133,180 $166,291 $167,500 $180,500 
60,806 102,774 59,828 46,750 



135,187 212,028 

187,369 147,557 

53,654 55,654 

63,780 150,000 



98,666 65,800 

149,319 148,900 

5,000 125,000 

409,196 290,394 



$633,976 $834,304 $889,509 $857,344 



James O Rumbaugh Jr. '50 

G Oliver Sands '26 

Mr. & Mrs Robert A Scharfe '31 

Robert E. Schellberg hc'70 

John & Irene Etter Schmehl '63 

Jane Schnure '39 

Morgan R '35 & Daisy Reese Schremer '34 

Harry P Shatter '29 

Nevin C. T '49 & Sara Wormley Shatter x'41 

Paul C Shatto Jr. '41 

Paul C- Shatto Sr. 

Charles J. Shearer '31 

Ray G Sheeler "28 

Erie I. Shobert II '35 

Andrew & Ruth Butfington Smith '49 

Carl G. Smith '28 

G. Wellington & Lucy Herr Smith '26 

Robert Alan Smith '62 

Helen Ott Soper '28 

Jacob M Spangler '52 

George C. Spiggle '34 

Mary E. Spiggle '34 

Helen Wentzel Spitzner '37 

Signe Altord Starner '31 

Walter L. Startzel '68 

J. Donald Steele '33 

Mary G Steele '14 

John R '51 & Lois Gordon Steiger '52 

Richard L. Steinberg '68 

Catherine E Stelt2 h'68 

L. Naomi Steward 

John W. Thompson 09 

George W. '22 & Bertha Stammler 

Townsend h'34 
S- Prentiss Turnbach 
Dorothy Turner '36 
Robert A. Updegrove '41 
Dennis 68 & Margaret Orth Van Name '66 
Horace W. Vought x'29 
Donald R Walk '55 
Patricia A. Walker '59 
Norman E. Walz h'67 



Howard H Weaner Jr 

Dr & Mrs. Gustave W. Weber h'64 

Robert F Weis 

Helen Salem Wescoat '19 

H W Wieder Jr. 

Robert E. Winter '48 

Robert B. Witmer '74 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerhard Wolt 

Nancy E Youhon '52 

Shirley A Young '51 



ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS 

X 

Anna C. Barley 

Gussie Eisenhuth Casner 

Dr. & Mrs. George W. Harrison 

Virginia Payne 

1900 

"Estate of W Ralph Wagenseller 

1902 

"Maude Reichley Moist 

1907 

D Franklin Fisher 

1908 

Ralph W Showers 

1909 

'Grace A. Geiselman 
•John W Thompson 

1911 

•William N. Duck 



1913 

•Maria Geiselman Gabnelson 
•John B. Kntseley 
Sarah B Manhart 

1914 

"Mary G. Steele 

1915 

Wilbur Bennage 

Jess Pleasanton Coxe 
•J. Frank Faust 
•Ira C. Gross 

Mabel Bauder Martin 

Susan Geise Shannon 

Alice F. Weaver 

Catherine A. Weaver 

Gertrude F Weaver 

1916 

"David S Kammerer 
Mary A. McCoy 

1917 

•Phoebe Herman 

P. Kepner Jarrett 

Ira C Mummert 

Elizabeth Hall Neideigh 

Marion Moyer Potteiger 

F E Remaly 
"Paul A Rothtuss 

Paul D. Stees 

1918 

Paul B Faust 
Nora G. Green 
Relda Robb Hamilton 
*Lulu FetteroU Harman 
Eva P Herman 
Katharine Persing 
Marion Rose Phillips 
Helen Fetterolf Riden 
Lillian Diehl Shaffer 

1919 

Wiiiard 0. Allbeck 
Jennie Mae Botdorl 
Hulda Steininger Bowser 
Charlotte Weaver Cassler 
Harry J. Crouse 

Harry F & Celia Speigelmire Shoat 
Dorothy Allison Stone 
'Helen Salem Wescoat 

1920 

*Arch A Aucker 
Evelyn Allison Boeder 
Ernest B Cassler 
Esther Cressman 
Joseph L Hackenberg 
Susan Reanck Shannon 

1921 

"Anonymous 
"Mabel Steffen Broscious 
•Ida Olmstead Frednckson 

Raymond F Getty 

Yvonne Everest Harmon 

Marie Romig Huntington 
'Ellis K Lecrone 

Ruth Welker Schwartz 

Russel F Steininger 

Harry E Swanger 

H. Don Sweeley 

Ruth LaRue Thompson 

Mildred E. Winston 

1922 

Beatrice Fisher Dunning 

Lester J Kaufman 
'Alma L Long 
"Bessie C Long 

Nora Goff Manley t 
"George W Townsend 

Wallace J Wagner 

1923 

•John W. Blttlnger 

John I. & Stella Risser Cole 
"Marlyn R Fetterolf 
'Beatrice Rettinger 
•B. C. Rothtuss 

Peron Snyder 

Thomas H Stetler 

Thomas J Weibie 

1924 

Andrew H Beahm 
"Margaret Widlund Blough 
"Alvin W Carpenter 

W John Derr 
"Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf 



•Raymond W. Klinedinst 

Edith Littley Kronmeyer 
•Alma V. McCollough 

Ruth Bond Steininger 

Amy A. Swab 

Florence Keister Valentine 

Rachel Brubaker Whited 

1925 

•Norman R. Benner 
"Dr. & Mrs. Roger M Blough % % 

William C. Bowser 

Laura Henmnger Boyer 
"Lewis R Drumm Sr. 
"Marlin M Enders 

Harland D Fague 

C. Ralph Gramley 

Martin L. Grossman 

Frona Krebs Hummer 

Alda L. Long 
•William L. Nicholls 

Mary Potteiger 

W. Earl Thomas 

Matilda Wertz Wagner 

Christie E. Zimmerman 

1926 

Lee E Boyer 

Percy 8. Davis 

Hayes C. Gordon 

Margaret Morning Haiston 

Margaret E. Keiser 

Catherine Beachley Middleswarth 

Anna M. Norwat 

Mary Reigler Oyler 

Dorothy W Reeder 
"Harry M. Rice 

Austin C. Roche 
*G. Oliver Sands 
'Lucy Herr Smith 

Ethel V. Taylor 

Parke R. Wagner 

Luther M Weaver Jr. 

1927 

Mary E Bowersox 

Jacob L. Brake 

Ruth J. Brubaker 
'Charles E. Chaffee 

Lester E Croft 
"Elsie Nace Enders 
'Delsey Morris Gross 
'Laura Arnold Hart 

Zelda F Haus 
"Emily McElwee Jamison 
'Anna Brosious Klinedinst 

Grace Beckley Kramer 

Ruth Evans Sebastian 
•Lloyd A Stahl 

Margaret Snyder Stevens 

Roland M. Swartzwelder 
"Adeline Phillips Wingard Vought 

Gertrude V Walker 

Bert E Wynn 

1928 

•John M. Auten 

Naomi Fogle Bennett 

Ray L Bright 

Joyce Bousum Burton 

Margaret H. Buyers 

Theodore Cameron 

Kenneth M. Cassell 
"Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee 

Edwin O Constable 

Vesta Steininger Cook 

Elizabeth Stong Eichelberger 

Ruth Folkmann 
'Laura L. Gemberling 

Dorothy K. Goff 

Jerome B.S. Kaufman 
•Elizabeth Hauser Klnsel 

Jacob O. Kroen 
•Hannah Pitner Lambed t- 

Margaret Heldt Lelnbach 
"Paul B. Lucas 
'Mary Weimer Moffitt 
•Ray G. Sheeler 
'Carl G Smith 
'Helen Ott Soper 

Mary Wentzel Updegrove 

Essex Botstord Wagner 

Prudence Wilson Weaver 

1929 

Helen Simons Barrlck 
Robert W & Eleanor Coons Crouse 
Nancy Lecrone Fay 
•Ruth Pace Fuellhart 
Mary Shaffer Helnze 
Gertrude Fisher Jones 
Ruth Dlvely Kaufman 



•Rose Gumberi Krape 

Harry J. Lupfer t 

Mildred l Potteiger 

Rebecca C Puffenberger 

Raymond O. Rhine 
'William O. Roberts 
'Harry P. Shaffer 

Russell T Shilling 
•Horace W Vought 

Frank C Wagenseller 

Frank W Weaver 

1930 

Harry S. Baird 
'Mr & Mrs Paul M Bishop 

Verna I Brooks 

Ralph H. Casner 

John F DeLay 
"Miller R. Gerhardt (deceased) 

Sherman E. Good 

Oren S. Kaltriter 

Florence Lauver 
*Myer R. Musser Sr. 

Ruth Goff Nicodemus 
'Simon B Rhoads 

William F Routzahn 

Calvin L. Sarver 

James M. Scharf 

G. Marlin Spaid 

Dorothy Fisher Stoddard 

1931 

'Alvin T. Barber 

Lois Brungart Bendigo 
'H Vernon & Marie Blough 
•Martha Laudenslager Davis 

Irene Brouse Dickey 
•Lawrence C. Fisher 

Frank C. Gill 
'Mr & Mrs. Paul M. Haines 

Paul W. Hartline 

William S Hermann 

Gerhard F. Kern 
"George H Lambert t 

L. Howard Lukehart 

Bryce E. Nicodemus (deceased) 

Inez Sarver Parker 
'Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Scharfe 

Raymond C Scott 

John P. Senko 
'Charles J Shearer 
*Signe Alford Starner 

Dorothy Turnbach Stickney 

Nellie Shue von Dorster 
•W Michael Weader 

1932 

Melvin S Adams 
•Martha Gessner Anderson 

Dorothy Puckey Clark 

Margaret M. Clelland 
•Herman R. Fenstermacher 

Roscoe L. Fisher 

Lewis R Fox 

Robert G. Hartman 
"Herbert G Hohman 

Dorothy Arbogast Kaltriter 
"John F Kindsvatter 

Andrew V. Kozak 

Eleanor Sheriff McAnulty 

Dorothy Forcey Pletcher 

Elizabeth Charles Wetzel 

Arthur A Wilmarth 

Kermit D Witmer 

1933 

Beatrice Gentzler Armold 
'Grace C. Boyle 

Selon F Dockey 
'Laird S Gemberling 

Martin A Graykowski 

John L. Hassay 

Margaret Ide Magulre 

Estelle Pearl Marcuse 

Mae McDonald McGroarty 

John W. Meyers 

William E. Royer 

John A. Schoftstall Sr. 

Frances Stambaugh Shade 

Flora Ellmore Shilling 

Herbert H. Snell 

Mildred Griesemer Snyder 

Ruth Mlljer Steese 
"J. Donald Steele 

William R. Swarm 

Amelia Krapf Williams 

Bruce & Marian Walborn Worthington 

1934 

'Peter Blackwood 
James A Bonsall 
•Russell Carmlchael 



GIFTS FOR 
CURRENT OPERATIONS 



1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 
1970-71 
1971-72 
1972-73 
1973-74 



$147,000 
149,000 
193,000 
261,000 
280,000 
260,000 
253,000 
299,000 



'Henry H. Cassler 

Edwin M. Clapper 

Edith Frankenfield Cramer 

B. Esther Ditchfield 

Audra Marts Etzweiler 

Ruth Plummer Fagan 

Madeline Steininger Hermann 

Ernest W Huston 
*D. Edgar & Aberdeen Phillips Hutchison 

Nelson J. King 

Isabella Horn Klick 
•Ruth Bergstresser Koch 

Daniel T. McKelvey 
•William S Morrow 
'Pauline Crow Mount 
'Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads 

Lee D Rishel 

Harold L. Rowe 

H. Blanche Savidge 

Jerauld M Schiegei 
'Daisy Reese Schreiner 

Richard B Shade 

Ruth Nelson Sieber 
"Mary Elise Spiggle 

James C. Suter 

Sara Ulnch Tollinger 

Albin L. Zimliki 

1935 

'Kenneth R. Anderson 

Timothy E Barnes 

Robert R. Clark 

Mary A. Cressman 
•Ralph C. Geigle 

Louise B Hartzell 

Donald K. Henry 
•Charles G. Jones 
•'Louise Mehring Koontz 
'Stephen J. Martlnec 

Frances Hubler Nuernberg 

Anna E. Olinger 
"Morgan R. Schreiner 
"Erie I, Shobert* 

William E Sullivan 

1936 

'Frederic C Billman 

Max S. Blair 

H. Vernon Ferster 

Kathryn Weber Finkblner 

James A. Grossman t 
•Janet Earhart Harklns 

Horace M. Hutchison 

Pearl M. Kaler 

Eugene D. Mitchell 
'Robert W Prltchard 

Mary Landon Russell 

LaRue C Shempp 
'Ralph I. Shockey 

Marcella Chaya Turnbach 
'Dorothy Turner 
•Walter Wasilewski 

1937 

Eleanor Jones Barnes 
'Oren N. Benner t 

Martha A Fisher 
'Mary Scott Gumpher t 

Newton E. Hess 
'Dr. & Mrs. Lester J Karschner 

Woodrow J Kllnger 

Paul S. Lubold 
•John C. McCune II 



Elsie Myers 

Frances Smith Novinger 

B. Henry Shafer 

E. Raymond Shaheen 
"Helen Wentzel Spitzner 
•John A. & Mary Barnes Topper 

Dorothy Savidge Troutman 

Mary Ann Fox Wagenseller 

1938 

Margaret Boyle Brown 

Ethel Ramer Coulter 

Mark R. Guthrie Sr. 
"Betty Johnston Keil 
'Esther Yingling Kern J 

Ray W. Kline 
"Herbert C. Lauver 

John Rakshys 

Ruth Jones Scott 

Elizabeth Fry Vogel 

1939 

•William P. Ayers 
•Robert M. Bastress 

Harold E. Bollinger 

Emerson L. Derr 

Miriam Miller Fisher 

Lenora Spotts Guthrie 
•Robert L. Herr 

Eleanor Saveri Wise 
"Henry J. Keil 
'W. Frank & Isabel Tewkesbury 

Laudenslayer 

Lula M. Lawson 

Alverna Reese Lorah 

Michael L. Mastovich 

Kathryn R. Meyer 
•Paul D- Ochenrider 

Stephen W. Owen 

Mathilda Neudoerffer Powell 

Martha Klinger Riegel 
*M. Jane Schnure 
'Shirley Finkbeiner Stehlin 

Eleanor Saveri Wise 

1940 

"Hester Bittinger Ayers 

Andrew A. Clark Jr. 

Donald A. Critchfield 

Edward E. Eisenhart 

Fern Zechman Ferster 

Robert F. Fisher 

J. Leon Haines 

Horace A. Kauffman 
"Eunice Arentz Knupp 
"Nevin & Florence Rothermel Latsha 
•Charles R. Loss 
•William E. Nye II 

Paul M. Orso 

Hubert R. Pellman 

Hilda Frederick Schadel 
•Harold E. Shaffer 
"Jack P. Shipe 
'George C. Spiggle 

Barner S. Swartz 

Virginia Mann Wotven 

1941 

'Florence Reitz Brenneman 
'Joseph F. Campana 

Lois Yost Critchfield 

Elaine Miller Hunt 
'Mary Emma Yoder Jones 
•Jane Hutchison Kaempfer t 

Dorothy Artz Kepler 

H. Faith Harbeson McNitt 
'Douglas A. Portzline 

John P. Powell 

Lois Beamenderfer Rallis 

Wiiiard H. Schadel 
'Jane Wormley Shaffer 
'Ruth Naylor Shaffer 
•Paul C. Shatto Jr 
'Robert A. Updegrove 

1942 

Frederick O. Brubaker 
'Meivin E. Haas 
'Jeanne Fenner Helm t 

John D. Ickes 
'Albert C. Knapp 

Robert H. Messner 

William H. Mitman 

Gertrude Fetzer Pardoe 
"Edward S. Jr. & Blanche Forney Rogers 

Chester J. Shusta 
"Philip R. Templin t 

1943 

Wilmer H. Grim 
James W. Hall Sr. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Transfers 

For the Years Ended June 30, 1974 and 1973 



REVENUES: 

Educational and General: 
Student Tuition and Fees 
Gifts and Grants 
Investment Income 
Other Sources 

Total Educational and General 

Auxiliary Enterprises 

Total Revenues 

EXPENDITURES AND MANDATORY TRANSFERS: 

Educational and General: 
Instructional 
Library 

Student Services 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant 
General Administration 
General Institutional 
Staff Benefits 
Student Aid 
Other 

Total Educational and General 

Mandatory Transfers: 

Principal and Interest 
Renewals and Replacements 

Total Mandatory Transfers 

Auxiliary Enterprises: 

Expenditures 
Mandatory Transfers: 

Principal and Interest 

Renewals and Replacements 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises 
Total Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers 
Revenues over Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers 

OTHER TRANSFERS: 

Plant Funds: 
Current Year Additions 
Future Plant Additions 
Retirment of Indebtedness 

Total Other Transfers 

Excess (Deficit) of Revenues over Expenditures 
and Transfers 



1974 



$3,046,934 

429,351 

78,523 

266,231 

3,821,039 

1,379,506 

5,200,545 



960,773 



1973 



$2,932,938 

449,423 

83,669 

94,768 

3,560,798 

1,362,966 

4,923,764 



1,521,432 


1,363,044 


103,303 


93,439 


360,984 


337,699 


533,101 


483,500 


250,434 


212,762 


216,415 


202,862 


273,296 


250,411 


204,697 


147,844 


65,464 


53,972 


3,529,126 


3,145,533 


376,456 


359,236 


14,750 


14,750 


391,207 


373,986 



962.762 



104,983 


102,561 


44,250 


44,250 


1,110,006 


1,109,573 


5,030,339 


4,629,092 


170,206 


294,672 



178,097 


113,510 


-0- 


134,237 


2,350 


7,850 


180,447 


255,597 


(10,241) 


39,075 



•John C. Helm t 

"Dorothy Dellecker Hochstuhl % 

Marion Crow llgen 
"Lawrence M. Isaacs t 

Ruth E McCorkill 
'Marjone Wolfe McCune 

Dons Welch Mitman 
"Donald F. & Ruth Billow Spooner 

Feme Arentz Stonesifer 
•John V Walsh 

1944 

•Katharine Heldt Aucker 
"Mary Jane Rudy Clark 

Phyllis Wolte Englert 
'William A & Margaret Gemmill Janson 
'Raymond R. Schramm J 

Helen Hocker Schueler 

E. Jane Stilt 

Catherine Byrod Whitman 

1945 

Mary Moyer Bnngman 
Jean Kinzer Bnnser 
"Louise Kresge Isaacs t 
Xorinne Kahn Kramer $ 
Joyce Jenkins McClure * 
Harold R- Snyder 

1946 

"James R. Clark 
Charlotte Smith Harrison 
Roswell Johns 
Norma Hazen Jones 
•Jean Wheat Schramm t 
C. Glenn Schueler 
Rine G. Winey 

1947 

Donald R- Bashore 

William E Somgardner 

Frank Corcoran 

Franklin E. Fertig 

Mary Lizzio Govekar 
•Mr & Mrs. W. David Gross 
•Raymond G. Hochstuhl t 

Lenore Garman Horner 

Gayle Clark Johns 

Nancy Myers Landis 

Richard D Moglia 

George E Riegel III 

Louise H. Schlick 

Ira A. Wasserberg 

Elyse Thompson Wohlsen t 

Adah A. Wolfe 

Ruth Williams Zeidler 

1948 

Shirley Shroyer Bartholomew 

John B & Dawn Ebert Bergstresser 

David E. & Betty Smith Bomboy 

Dale S Bnngman 

Aloysius W Derr 

Eugene H. & Dorothy Eilhart Gundrum t 

H Lee Hebel 

Caroline Graybill Heimberger 

Carl L. Herman 

Donald L. Herrold 

Sara Lee Smith Ivers 

Elizabeth Reisch Jones 
"Harold R Kramer t 

Gloria Reichley Krug 

James S. Leitze! 
•Richard W. & Gertrude Roberts 

Lindemann t 

Kenneth D. Loss 

William H. McClure t 

Robert W Radell 
'Bessie Bathgate Ruhl 

Lois Dauberman Schultz 
'Robert E Winter 

Robert F. Wohlsen t 

William P. Yancho 

Frank A, Zeidler 

Marlanna Hazen Zimmerman 

1949 

Donald L. Adams 
"Douglas E Arthur $ 
Roy R. Bilger* 
Paul R. Blngaman 
Edwin L. Bittenbender 
Kay L. Bloom 
Muriel Phillips Conway 
Phyllis Swartz Derr 
John G. Devlne 
Lillian Kepner Duden 
Edward H. Ford 
Charles L. Gottschall 
Lois Young Guistwhite 
Irma Strawbndge Hallenbeck 



'Mary Jane Jessen Hansen 

Edna Etzrodt Harkness 

Grace Lau Hawk 

Edith Wegner Hebel 

Mary Ann Getsinger Homan 

Nancy Everett Hoover 

Robert S. Hoover 

Isabel Kiss Jones 

Maude Jones Koch 

Jane Southwick Mathias 
•Elwood M. McAllister 
"Kenneth M. Merz 
'Charles A. Morris 

Winifred Myers Odell 

Kenneth D. Orr 

James B. Peters 

Joyce Bell Port 

James B. Reilly 

Dolores Mattson Ristine 
•William R. Ruhl 

Helen Smith Sanders 
•Nevin C.T. Shaffer 

Joyce Bottdorff Sheaffer 
•Ruth Buffington Smith 

Willis B. Van Dyke 

Erma Bonawltz Warnes 

Donald H. Wilson 

John H. Wright Jr 
"Evan P. & Frances Lybarger Zlock 

1950 

'Donald Babies 
•Earl L. Bernstine 

Robert L. Block 

Lillian Hoover Bloomqulst 

Paul & Virginia Blough Buehler 

Robert L. Caldwell t 

Richard E. Campbell 

Henry G. Chadwick 

Donald R. Davis 

Charles H. Duncan 
"James C. Gehris 

Harold S. Greenly % 

Floris Guyer Hains 

Barbara Watkms Hartley 
"Frederick E. Hazeltlne 

Paul J. Herb 

R. Nelson Kost 

Joseph A. Ladika 
•Raymond C. Lauver 

Jean Rothermel Miller 

Vernon J. Miller 

Earl H. Mincemoyer 
"Albert P. Jr & Louise Siemers Molinaro 

JoAnn Hon Moyer 

Jeanne M. Orner 
'James O. Rumbaugh Jr. 

Barbara Decker Siegfried 

Janet Wolf Statler 

Harry G. Stetser 

Franklin T. Ullman 

Paul A. Wagner 

Richard G Westervelt 

Richard L. Wetzel 

Lloyd T. Wilson 
'Donald E. Wissmger 

1951 

"Marsh C. Bogar 

Herbert 0. Bollinger 
•Hazel Brobst Brown 

Lyn Bailey D'Alessandro 

Nelda Shafer Davis 

Daniel R. Erdman Jr. 
"Martha Martin Gehris 

Herbert R. Hains Jr. 

Jacob B. Harder Jr t 
•Jeanne Attinger Hassmger 

Gardiner Marek 

Marilyn Beers Reilly 

William R. Smeltz 
•John R. Steiger 

Jesse Stone Jr. 

Mary Lehman Van Dyke 
'Flora Barnhart Wissinger 
•Shirley A. Young 

1952 

Elinor Tyson Aurand 

Russell C. Bartle 
"Elmer R Baumgardner 

Donald C- Berninger 

Charles L Bomboy 

Vincent E. Boyer t 
'Charles H. & Voylet Dietz Carr 

C. Dale Gateman 

Patricia F. Heathcote 

Daniel O. Hoy 

Barbara Easton Johns 
*Kay LaRue Lauver 

Faye R Lewis 



"Lorraine Rarick Liddington 

Ethel McGrath Meola 

Betty Albert Messner 

James W Morris 

William R. Nale 

Miriam Vogler Olson 

Edward J Palkovich 
'Kathleen Schnerr Price 

Lois Renfer 

Chester G Rowe 
'Jacob M. Spangler Jr. 
"Lois Gordon Steiger 

John J. Takach 

G. Allan Vollmers 
'Nancy E. Youhon 

Charles Zlock 

1953 

James A Deitch 

Lewis R. Drumm Jr. t 

Lois Fisher Frednckson t 

Edward P. Kopf 

John W. Mayer 

Beatrice Morrow Myers 

T. Justin Myers Jr. 
•Paul R. Nestler Jr. 

Kenneth E. Orris 

Samuel Porter Jr 

Marvel Cowling Robinson 
'Dorothy Apgar Ross 

Dean E. Rupe 

Edward T. Unangst 

Ernest R. Walker 

Margaret Zinda Weaver 

Daniel W. & Betty Wiant Williamson 

Gunnar W. Zorn 

1954 

•Henry R. Albright 

Irene Meerbach Anderson 

Marilyn Huyett Becker 

Carolyn Lucas Boyer 

Janice Ford Buford 
"Nora Stelnhards Gatins 
•Joyce K. Gilbert 
•Wallace E. Gordon 

Irene Oldt Huss 

Shirley Thompson Khalouf 

Eleanor Borskl King 

Edward E. Lamb Jr. 
•George C. Liddington 
'Graydon I Lose 

•Robert C & Jane Cline Mickatavage 
•Rebecca Shade Mignot t 

Ruth E. Osborn 

Eleanore Steffey Rachau 

Frank D. Richards 
•Samuel D. Ross 

John H. Schraeder 

Louis A. Szabo t 

Janet Laue Touring 

Dorothy Sites Wagner 

Audrey M. Warnets 

Faye Kostenbauder Williamson 

Barbara Morris Zorn 



1955 

Walter C. Albert Jr. 

Bruce A. Bell t 

Larry R & Carlene Lamade Bmgaman 

Charles W & Rose Sharretts Coates 

Kenneth F. Erdley 

Shirley Decker Gateman 
•James J. Gormley t 

Harry F. Kocher Jr. 

Carol Cornelius Lamb 

W. Deen Lauver 

Richard E McCarty t 
•Ruth Scott Nunn 

Annabelle Thomas Rogers 

James G. Showalter 

Frank G. Smith 
•Merle F Utsh Jr. 

William H. Vanderhoof Jr 
•Donald R. Walk 

1956 

Evelyn Herbstrith Baker 

Deborah Krapf Bell t 

John C & Charlotte Meerbach Bunke 
'Carol Dauberman Chidsey 

Charlotte Sandt Erdley 
'Elsie Gruber Gormley t 

Robert L. Hackenberg t 
"Donald L. Hartman 

Winifred Bonsall Kelter 

Nancy L. Kline 

Harry M. Leister Jr. 

Eleanor Dively Mora 

Mary Hildebrand Naugle 

Joanne Mummert Spangler 

Gene A. Stettler 

Audrey Vollman Vanderhoff 

Elizabeth Ford Vandevander 
•John D. & Janet Garner Yeich 

1957 

"Lynn Hassinger Askew 
"Nelson E. Bailey 

Jack K. Bishop t 

Linda Youhon Collins 
•Marion D. Drumheller 

Ronald E. Fouche 

Jane Longenecker Grim 
•John S. Hendricks 
"Clay L. Lorah t 

Natalie Wilhour Maurer 

Suzanne Beal McCarty $ 

Carole Sadosuk Morgan 

Rita Williamson Neago 
•Peter M. Nunn 

Nancy Lee Forrest Peel 

George H. Pospisil t 
'Edward R. Rhodes Jr. 

Frank L. Romano 

Martha McNitt Runkle 

Suzanne Wahl Schaeffer t 

Galen W. Schlichter 

George F. Schluchterer III t 

Sandra Gilfillan Showalter 

Dorothy Wardle Spencer 




Janet Swenson Updegrove 
•Patricia A. Walker 
Joan Raudenbush Wendel 
Arthur A. Zimmerman $ 

1958 

Anne M. Ambromovage 

•Frederick J, Chrvala 

'Mary Louise Neal Coleman 

'Burdell S. Faust 

Ronald D. Fleming 

William R. Hand 

Wade L- Hoffman 

Doris Keener Holcomb 
"Alice Ann Patterson Leidel 

Nancy Ridinger Leonard 

Janice Arcidiacono-Paul 

Wayne W. & Janet Gordon Rutz 

Nancy Lockett Savage 

Mary Moore Schatkowski 

Janis Qulgley Schluchterer J 

Richard C. Smith Jr. 

Carolyn Gillaspie Snow 

Mary E Souden 

Harry D Wagner 
•James W. & Gail Woolbert White 

Robert A. & Gloria Myers Willauer 

1959 

Ronald G. Aller 

John T. Baskin 

Lester L. Brubaker 
'Carol Royer Caddell 
"Jack E. Cisney 

Harry L. Clark Jr. 

Robert L. Fiscus* 

Margaret Brubaker Gray 

Barbara Tongue Herold 

Roger A. Holtzapple 
Janis Adams John 

Harry E. Leonard 
Andrew G. Melnick 
Donald L. Middlesworth 
Judith Brown Mull 
Janet Snyder Ness 
Joseph & Sandra Meyer Osinchak 
Mary-Margaret Overly Peraro 
'Eleanor K. Pourron 
'Sidney F. Richard t 
Gail Muller Romano 
Margaret Dalby Zimmerman t 

1960 

Joseph S- Aleknavage 

"Donald E. Coleman 

Brian L. Donley 

Ralph W. & Helen Harding Ferraro 

Frances Wirt Fisher 
•Donald M. Gray 

Gary A. Hackenberg 

C. Edward Huber 

C. Wesley Hunt 

Marilyn Faiss Johnson 

Sara Lee McCahan 
•James R. Middleswarth 

Joyce Arnold Post 

Harry L. Powers 

Richard D. Reichard 

Ray E. Richie 
"Kermit R. Ritter 

Allen I. Rowe 

Denny R. & June Nonnemacher Shank 

Larry W. Updegrove 
•Willi K.E. Weichelt 

Larry A. Wingard 

Virginia Alexander Yanchus 

1961 

Barbara Angle Aller 
"Gilbert C. Askew 

Maurice H. Bobst Jr. 

Carl F- Bogar 

Louis R. & Margaret Webb Coons 

Charles P. Deitrich 

Richard L. Fausey 

Linda Traub Fiscus t 

R. Allen Fiscus 

Jane Reichenbach Geuder 

Marlin A. Inch 

Robert E. Leighty 

Linda K. Leonard 

Carol J. McCloy 

Laurence W. Miller 

Frank A. Procopio J 

Neal D Rebuck 
'Sandra Brandt Richard t 

Janice Stahl Snyder 

Mary Ann Adams Vought 
•Robert A. Welker 



1962 

'Dorothy M. Anderson 
Elizabeth Hodges Bagger 
Rosemary Losch Beaver 
Ned S. Coates 
Fritz J. Fichtner Jr. 
Ronald I. Foye 

Thomas Hanshaw 

Sharon Martin Hemmer 

Judith Diehle Hunt 

Nathan A. Kale 

'Norman H. Lauer 

Joan Lawley Leighty 

Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan 

Judith Arnold Mclnryre 
•Jean Ewald Middleswarth 

Wayne H Minami 

Terry L Moll 

Nancylee Dunster Moore 

Judith Behrens Myers 

Francis A. Nace 

George P II & Sarah Lockett Pressley * 

Louetla Coccodnlli Procopio t 

Richard E. Rohland $ 

Joyce Sheesley Shirey 
'Robert Alan Smith 

John H. Spillman 

1963 

Jay S. Ber man 

James C. & Carol Gresh Black 
'Michael Cordas Jr. 
Barbara A Deroba 
Patricia Estep Dysart 
Jane Beers Epinger 
'Kenneth R. Fish 
'Stephen C Gettier 
Naomi Weaver Grondahl 
Carol Ann Cairns Henry 
Joseph W. Herb 
'Elwood Hippie Jr. 
•Joe W. Kleinbauer 
Sandra Dunkle Klotz 
Peter H. Kuebler 
Lynn E. Lerew 

John F. & Peggy Thoman Luscko 
Miriam Brown Markowitz 
Marjorie Blair Matson 
"Carl M. Moyer 
Mary Brown Murray 
Cynthia Hoffman Priest 
Sue Houseworth Rose 
Carol Shesler Rowe 
Anita Ruhling Sapp 
Irene Etter Schmehl 
Carolyn Moyer Schneider 
Barbara Claffee Schumacher 
Virginia Weatherlow Shelley 
Samuel R Shirey 
Sandra K. Sholley 
Neil R. Smith 
Linda Leach Spillman 
Samuel T, Tyler 
•Rudolph Van der Hiel 
H. Nathan Ward 
"Candace Fink Woernle 

1964 

Robert C. Aerni 

Alan Bachrach Jr 

Ann Spriggle Beaver 

Richard J. & Gail Hart Biederman 

Brian Bolig 
•Patricia Cook Brant $ 

Frederick D. Brown 

Donna Zeilman Chestnut 

Gene H. Dechert 

Barbara Allen Fiscus 
•William A. Gerkens 

Albert W. Grondahl 
•Robert G. Gundaker 
Terry Hand 
Fred G. Hershey 
Lloyd R. Hettenbach 
Ann Siple High 
Jon D. Inners 
Wayne Kauffman 
Pamela J. Kay 
Alan L. Kiel 
George A. Kirchner 
Judith Rothermel Kosterlitz 
Judith Tuma Kuebler 
Barbara Stockalis Labanosky 
Frank J. Leber 
William E. Lindsay 
William H. Lips 
Barry I. Markowtiz 
Martha Sue Detjen Moll 



MEMORIAL GIFTS 

DURING the period July I, 1973 through June 30, 1974 the Uni- 
versity received gifts in memory of: 



Claude G. Aikens '11 

Harry J. Bailey 

The Rev. Andrew J. 78 & Carrie 

Copenhaver Bean 78 
Mrs. Carol N. Dewsbury 
Charles C. Eberly III '65 
Elizabeth G Eyster '72 
Adelaide Stewart Hostetter x'39 



Dr. John J. Houtz 08 
Or Robert J. MacNamara Jr. '53 
Anna Nichols Micka '34 
Veryl J. Milroy x"59 
David Blaine Moist 02 
Cordilla Moyer Moyer x'17 
Clyde R. Spitzner '37 
Horace W Vought Jr. '64 



A GIFT was also received in honor of: 



Jack E. Wilkinson 



George M Mowers Jr 
James B. Norton III 
•Robert R. Richards 
Bruce T, Sabin t 
James F Sandahl 
Karen Bond Scala 
David J Schumacher 
Richard A. & Susan Chapman Seaks 
'Carol Knox Seitz 
Lawrence E Shaffer 
Robert Y & Pamela Yeager Silar 
Joseph A. Snyder Jr 
Ann Latimer Strate 
James W. Summers 
'Walter Woernle Jr. 

1965 

Susan Duerr Borgerding 

Stacey L. Bottiger 

Arthur F. Bowen 

Frances Ray Burks 

Susan L. Evans 

Meredyth H. Ewing 

Paul G Filipek 

George W Fishel Jr. 

Judith Stichler Goda 

Robert A Good 

John F. Grebe 

Cortland M. Hatfield 

Harold J. Hershey 

Bonnie Schaffer Hettenbach 

Katharine Fairty Hughes 

Bonnie L. Johnson 

Mary Louise West Johnson 

Dawn Fife Kinard 

Jean Price King 

Carol Cox Kirchner 

Peter D. & Carol Ocker Kirk 

Milton M. Kuhn 

Carolyn Tweed Leap 

Sally Schnure Lindsay 

Victoria S. Long 
•Milton H. Maslin Jr. 

Peter L Matson 

Richard B. Meserole 

Carl F. Miller 
'Wayne W. Miller 
'Susan C. Petrie 
Suzanne Tomasko Power 
Bonnie Bucks Reece 
'Eric L. Reichley 
*Adele Breese Richards 
'Steven L. Seitz 
William G. Straus 
Betsy Bunting Strong 
Barbara Evans Summers 
David M Wilkinson 

1966 

Samuel R. & Mary Lee Andrews 

Timothy R. Barnes 

Larry D. & Priscilla Clark Bashore 



'Herbert G Boettger Jr 
William Dalious 
Elizabeth Braun Davidson 
'Sue C. Davis 
"Marilyn E. Eck 
Wayne H. Fisher 
Karen Smith Fry 
Christopher J Gipe 
Linda Carothers Good 
Patricia Laubach Hallman 
Genette A Henderson 
Donald S. King 
Myrna G Lee 
Susann McAuliffe Lucas 
Robert J Lulh 
Edwin M. Markel Jr. 
Joan L. Meisenhelter 
Stephen D. Melchmg 
Joanne Drake Morns 
Richard E & Margaret Oelkers Talbot 
Gretchen Gochnour Thiele 
John R. Trimmer 
•Margaret Orth Van Name 
Carole Summer Ward 
Lois Swartz Yinglmg 
Suzanne Springer Zeok 

1967 

Anthony C Adamopoulos 

J Robert Arthur $ 

Reynold Badman 

Charles S. Bender II 

Franklyn M. Bergonzi 

F. Kent Bonney 

Donna A)<e Burkholder 

Dwight E Dickensheets 
Judith Lloyd Famous 
William J. Fry III 
Carole Sloan Grebe 
Carolyn Ruocco Grimes 
R. Thomas Jones 

John D. & Andrea Schumann Keim % 
Donald C Lindenmuth 
William F. Livengood 
Terry L. March 
Frank D Marsh 
Alicia Weeks McGivaren 
Gail Spory McPherson 
Robert R jr. & Carolyn Wahler Miller 
Christine Groth Murow 
'John A Norton 
Arthur J. Oriel 
'Lynn E. Persing 
George H, Pospisil X 
Nancy Baker Rosen 
Gary R. Seifert 
Donna Zeiders Sheaffer 
Robert C. Snyder 
Roger G. VanDeroef 
Margaret Shields Weidner 
William H. Wiest 
Paul P. Wild Jr. 
William L Yinglmg 



1968 

Linda W Baehr 

Dennis M. Baker 

Peggy Gilbert Beck 

W Dean Bickel 

Susan E Bishop 

James A. Bowman % 
'Samuel D. Clapper 

Nancy Dewsbury % 

D. Michael Faust 

Gwen Hennelorth Fitch 

Ruth A Flanders 

Christa Jorgensen Fuhrman 

Louis Green berg 

Willard M. Grimes III 

Robert W Hadfield X 

Samuel J Halpern 

Henry H Herrlngton 

Ruth Siegfried Himmelberger 

James P. Howard 

Benjamin L Jones 

Elizabeth Elmer Kaufmann 

Lloyd W Kleiman Jr. 

John F. Lehr 

James L. Lubrecht ll 

Ellen Biers Markel 

Donald A McBane 

Charles H McLeskey 

Richard E & Ellen Rogers Mearns 

John A Meyer 

Karen Geiger Nash 

Jeffrey L. Noble 
"Barbara Smith Norton 

Sally Gait Riddle 

Anne Ingram Ritsert 

H Larry Roberts 

Charles J Romberger J 

Laura Scaite 

Russell D Schantz Jr 

Kenneth R. & Betsy Klose Sellnger 

Donald P Shadle 

Jeffrey P. Spencer 

Norrine Bailey Spencer 
•Walter L Startzel 
•Ann L Stauffenberg 
•Richard L Steinberg 
•Cheryl R Stickle J 

Frederick R. Swavely t 

Marsha M Tamke 

Barbara Leonard Vaccaro 

Tnxanna Weber Van Anglen 
'Dennis Van Name 

Nancy Stroup Wagner 

Nan Weller 

Suzanne Yenchko 

1969 

Susan Agoglia % 

Keith H Bance 

Nancy Cary Barr 

Donald O Bensinger 

Gerald L. Book 

Barry E Bowen 

Willard J Bowen 

John L Boyer 

John C Brill 

John W Carothers 

Charles E Cloutman 

Howard R. Collins 

Walter W Custance Jr 

Peter W Delin 

Barbara Hitcnens DePerro 

Robert D DiPietro 

David M Dumeyer 

Pnscilla T Edwards 

Thomas C Eggleston Ml 

Robert G & Donna Hilton Fisher 

John C Flohr 

Philip D. Fowler III 

Elizabeth O Frost 

Robert E Guise 

Wendy Evans Hernngton 

Susan Stephan Hill 

Robert O Jesberg 

Barry R. Landis 

David C Lawrence 

Margaret Knouse Lewis 

Glenn E & Beth Runk Ludwig 

Holly Ford Marsh 

JoAnn Lester Maucher t 

Virginia Carlson McKenzle 

Robert G Monahan 

Samuel A Moyer 

William A Musser 

Alexander A Nash Jr 

Len E Negley 

Dale Jacobsen Noble 

Donald W Peppier Jr. 

Lanl Lee Pyles 



Philomena Quattrocchi 

Robert D. Jr & Beverly Dato Reber 

Nancy Haas Reese 

Wayne G Selfndge 

Robert X. Spero 

Gregory H. Trautman 

Richard C Unglert J 

Erik P. Van Anglen 

Edward H Vermillion 

Shirley Jones Vincent 

Barbara Ballard Wise 

Richard A. Workman 

Elsbeth H. Wngley 

Virginia Weatherby Young 

Karen Pfleger Zygan 

1970 

Keith N. Banner 
Paul W. Bankes 
Gwendolyn A. Baughman 
Marcia Graeff Bell 
Kathleen VanOrder Bowen 
Charles A Brophy 
R Gerald Carothers 
Henry J. DePerro 
David M Dolinsky 
Steven E. Dubs 
Robert R. Dunn III 
Sharman LeVan Ebbeson J J 
Sue J. Ebling 
Donald H. Fetterolf 
Dennis K. Hall 
Donald C. Hamlin t 
"Christian B Harris 
Robert B Heinemann 
Anne J Harrington 
Jane Schiller Hickey t 
James K. Hill 
Robert G. Hochstuhl t 
Cheryl Huleatte 

Larry C. & Linda Perry Kindsvater 
John L. Klenk 
Barry R. Klock 
Barbara Ann Latsha 
Mary Lotspeich Lawrence 
Janet Senft Lehr 
Barry I. Llewellyn 
Alan C Lovell 
Karen Emley Lubrecht 
Kathryn Klee Meyer 
Linda Palmer Miller 
James R. Nace 
H Gerald Nanos 
James C. Packard 

Marina Sinanoglou Papaconstantinou 
Emily Lees Peachey 
D Ward Plummer Jr 
Bonnie Jane Shockey 
Cheryl A. Snyder 
Ruth Stutzman Updegrove 
Louis A. Vermillion 
Paul Wm. Wenske 
David B. Werner 
Ruth A Zimmerman 

1971 

Bruce R. Bengtson 

Michael E & Valerie Fisher Borlner 

Patricia A. Bowman 

Richard W. Campbell 

Joan Burgess Cloutman 

Nancy Faringer Cressman 

Candace Kuckens DiPietro 

Susan Stewart Embessi 

Karen Kaneen Fetterolf 

John G. Foos t 

Cynthia A. Frlshkorn 

Signe S Gates 

H Wayne Griestt 

Peggy Marie Haas 

Cozette Hartman Haggerty 
•Judy Rechberger Harris 

Roberta Schroeder Hill 

Alan B. Kegerlse 

Lynne Kastrup Klenk 

Elissa Maurlello Krajewski 
•William L.S Landes III 

Jean McEvoy Llewellyn 

Linda Nansteel Lovell 

Anne Best Lutz i 

Irving A. Miller III 

Denny Packard 

Norma McElhaney Romberger J 

Lisa Deamer Sawyer 

David C. Schwalm 

Oeborah Devenney Spinney 

Linda Hughton Trezlse 

Jeffrey S. Wftte I 

John W Woodward 



1972 

Arlene Arndt 
Charlene Moyer Bance 
Stephen H Bender 
June Ross Bengtson 
Michael K. Brown 
Susan Hancock Coryell 
Jacqueline C Costello t 
Louise Hower Costello 
Sandra McDermott Dolinsky 
Kathy Eckenroth 
Pnscilla Gillespie 
Douglas Grlese 
Darcy Jones Hamlin $ 
Lisa J. Hauer 
Wendy Helliesen 
Diane G. Kelley 
•Bruce D. Kirk J 
Linda B. Kline 
David C. Koch 
Wendy Mohr Lewis 
Robert Wm. Maucher t 
Brian D McCartney 
Susan Seaks McLaughlin 
John C. Millen Jr. 
James Z. Morehouse 
Peter W. Murcott 
Gregory A. Peters 
Barry T. Rumple 
John L. Sawyer 
A. Rebecca Schumacher 
Stanley T. Snyder 
Ernest L & Karen Shaffer Tyler 
James R. & Joan Finsen Waeldner 
Lynn S. Whittlesey 
Lynn I. Williams 
Sharon A. Witteck 

1973 

Arlene Graybill Apple 
Ray H Boyer 
Robert M. Brenneman 
Linda Herrold Brophy 
David A. Coryell 
Keith J. Costello 
Paul H. Hartman 
Robert Hartt 
Anne L. Herdle 
Gail S. Holmes 
Dorothy Jean Knauss 
Robert S. Long 
Brian McCartney 
Allen Bradley Miller 
Yiu Dick Mo 
Nancy L. Moir 
Joseph C. Raho 
Marlyn I. Rath 
Peter R. Schuessler 
Barbara A. Schultz 
William M Weary 
Joan Mercer Witte i 
Alyce L. Zimmer 
Lynn David Zimmerman 

1974 

William D. Atkinson 
Bruce W. Downs 
Martha L. Graybill 
John B Hanawalt 
Karen A. Havrilko 
Paul R. Hinsch 
Cynthia K. Lupolt 
Thomas E Peachey 
Karen L. Stock 
Alan W Wasserback 
"Robert B Witmer 
Mellanay Auman Zarlng 



PARENTS AND FRIENDS 

Mr. & Mrs. George C. Adams 
Mr & Mrs J Robert Adams 
"C. Thomas Aikens 

"Myrl E Alexander hc'72 
Mr. & Mrs. Mark T. Ailing 
J. Samuel Allison 
Mr & Mrs. Herbert A. Anderson 
Vernon E. Anderson hc'72 
"John A. Apple hc'64 
"John B. Apple 
Mr. & Mrs. Allan Arbour 
Mr. & Mrs George A. Atkinson 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Atkinson 
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Ayres 
Mr. & Mrs. James Baglin 
Dr. & Mrs. John J. Baidula 
Mr. & Mrs. Merl P. Bahn 
Dr. & Mrs Forman T. Bailey Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bailey 
Jane F Barlow h"60 
Mr. & Mrs. Emil G- Barran 
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Barrett Jr. 
Dr. & Mrs. James S. Bates 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Bauer 
"John H. Baum hc'71 
"Augusta A. Bean 
Dr. & Mrs Charles Beegle 
Mr. & Mrs. Warren H. Bellis 
Mr. & Mrs. John Benincasa Sr. 
George H. Berkheirner hc'51 
Mrs. Leonard Bernas 
Mrs. Rita M. Bernatowicz 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Bernegger 
Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Bernhardt Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Arif Blosevas 
Mr. & Mrs. Fred 0. Bird 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Birdsall 
Carl B. Birosak 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Blauvelt 
Mr. & Mrs. R. H. Blend 
Mr. & Mrs. Peter Bolick Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. George Bookhout Jr. 
George C. Boone h'69 
John R. Booser 

•Philip C. Bossart h'57 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Bower 
Dent 8owser 

Mr & Mrs. Edward J. Boyer 
Mr. & Mrs James F. Bradford 
Robert L. Bradford h"69 

*F. William Brandt 
Mr. & Mrs. Bernard J Brandwene 

*J Stephen Bremer hc'74 
Mr. & Mrs. Al Brigante 

*Mr. & Mrs. James Brogan 
Mr. & Mrs James S. Brosius 

"Edgar S. Brown Jr. 
The Rev & Mrs. William M. Brown 
Mr. & Mrs. John J. Buckfelder Jr. 
"William R. Burchfield 
"Dr. & Mrs. Leonard F Bush hc'70 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Bushnell 
Dr. & Mrs. John C. W Campbell 
Mr. & Mrs. James S. Camut 
Mrs. Rita F. Capaldo 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Caporaso 
Mr. & Mrs Lewis K. Carey 
Mr. & Mrs Lynn M. Carlini 
Mr & Mrs. John J. Casey Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Cassidy 
Mr. & Mrs. George A Chase 
Mr. & Mrs. Saivatore D. Chiattitelli 

'Stanley Ciszak 
Frank M. Clark 
Mr, & Mrs. Richard A. Clark 
Col. & Mrs. John J. Cleary 
Mr Rose A Cleary 
Mr. & Mrs. Bryce C. Cochran 

"Sidney Cohn 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth M Cole Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs Edwin O. Constable 
Mr. & Mrs Philip R. Book 
Dr. & Mrs Robert G. Coutts 
Mrs. Laura Cramer 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Crist 
Mr & Mrs. John F. Daley Jr. 
Madeline Dalto 
Mrs. William Danclk 
Mr, & Mrs R C. Danielson 
Mr. & Mrs. S Leonard Davidson 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A Davidson 
Mr & Mrs. Howard A, Davis 
Mr. & Mrs Jesse F, Davis 
Mr & Mrs Wesley Davis Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs Waiter Deck 

•Charles 8 Degensteln 
Thomas G Delahunty 

"Howard E. DeMott h'54 




Patrick F. Denard 

Grace H. DeRose 

Mr. & Mrs. Leroy Diehl Sr. 

Nona M. Diehl hc'49 

Irene Dietz 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin Diggins Jr. 

Mrs. Stephen J, Domin 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. D'Onofrio 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert W. Douglas 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph L. Downey 

Mr. & Mrs. Myron Downs 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Duane 

Mr. & Mrs. Merle D. Dubs 
•Mr. & Mrs. Milton C. Dumeyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Duncan t 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Dunstan 

Mr. & Mrs. William K. DuVal 
"Mr. & Mrs. Charles C. Eberly Jr. 

Frances S. Eberly 

The Rev. G. Douglas Eberly 

Dr. & Mrs. Jacob A. Eberly Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph B. Eberly 

Russell N. Eberly 

Mr. & Mrs. Ludwig D. Eck 

Mr. & Mrs. James L. Eckman 

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Edry 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Etch 
•Phyllis Ellis 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph A. Enders 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Erdman 

George H. Erickson 
'Dr. & Mrs. Roland A. Erickson hc'70 $ 
"Donald H. & Margaret Snyder Ernst h'65 

Mr, & Mrs. Robert L. Eschelman 
'Mr. & Mrs. Jacob R. Esser 

Norma Estock 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond L. Everngam 
"Samuel H. Evert 

Ruth T. Eyerman 
"Mr. & Mrs. Dale F. Eyster 

Gordon E. Eyster 
'Mary H. Eyster 

Mr, & Mrs. Donald Farmer 

Helen E. Farmer 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Faron Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Willard R. Fasold 
"William O. Faylor Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Ferraro 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Fesniak 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Fetzer 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Fexa 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Filbey 

Stanley Filer 

Mr. & Mrs. David J. Fisher 
'Dr. & Mrs. Shelton Fisher hc'68 t 

Wallace E. Fisher hc'69 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Flackman 
'Kenneth O. Fladmark h'68 

Mr. & Mrs. Roger W. Flemmens 

Foster G. Fletcher 

Mr. & Mrs. Ivan L. Forman 

James M. Fortune 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Foster Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Baird Fox 
•Walter B. Freed 



The Rev. & Mrs. Arthur M. Frieberg 

Marcella W. Friedman 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Fuller 

Mr. & Mrs. Sydney F. Fuller 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Gable 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Gade 

Mr & Mrs. Charles R. Gaul Jr. 

William Gavrish Sr 

Dr. & Mrs. James C. Gehris 

Mr & Mrs. Henry W. Gent Jr, 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Gibb Jr. 
•Dr. & Mrs. Euell T. Gibbons hc'72 

Mr. & Mrs. Sid Gibelman 

Boyd Gibson 
•Gynith Giffin h'68 
•Russell W. Gilbert h'37 

Mr, & Mrs. William Gildersleeve 
"Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Goetze 

Mary M. Goodenow 

Mr. & Mrs. Byron C. Gordon 

Virginia Graybill 
•Fred A. Grosse h'67 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth H. Gross 

Dr. & Mrs. Glenn P. Grove 
•Wallace J. Growney 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Guiliano 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald L. Gump 

Mr. & Mrs. Willard Haas 

Mr. & Mrs. Preston Hadley 
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Hall 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward G. Hansberry 
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene M. Harkins 
•George F. Harkins hc'71 
Wauneta W. Harmatta 
The Rev. & Mrs. Oliver R. Harms hc'66 
Mr & Mrs. Bernard Havrilko 
Mr. & Mrs. William B. Hawke 
Mr & Mrs. Richard E. Hefler 
Elim Heggs Jr. 
•Robert A. Heinbach 
Kenneth Heiser 
Mr & Mrs. Robert A. Helmuth 
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Hess 
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Haverling Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Heyde 
Mr. & Mrs. John W. Heyman 
Mrs. Wilson Hoffman 
Dr. & Mrs. George L. Hoffmann 
Mr. & Mrs. William S. Holcombe 
David E. Horlacher 
"John C. Horn hc'65 
Mr. & Mrs. E. Dale Hornberger 
Robert C. Houston 
"Orlando W. Houts 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Huffine Sr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Sean Hughes 
Mr & Mrs. Douglas H. Hulst 
Mr & Mrs. Ronald W. Husband 
Charles J. Igoe h'69 
Mr. & Mrs. George W. Igenbrandt 
Samuel Jackman 
Walter M. Jacobi 
Mr. & Mrs. Martin Janis 
Mr & Mrs. Frederick H. Jarrett 
Mr. & Mrs. Erick A. Johnson 



Mr. & Mrs. Roger H. Johnson 
Mr & Mrs, Richard F. Jones 
Mr & Mrs. Rodger M. Jones 
Mr. & Mrs Russell Jones 
Mr & Mrs, Albert W. J. Kantz 
Mr & Mrs. David A. Karner 
•Hilda Karniol h'64 
Mr, & Mrs. Joseph Keane 
Margaret A Keeler 
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Kent 
Mr & Mrs. John H. Kestler 
Mr. & Mrs. Deri L. Kieffer 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Kimbel Sr. 
Mr & Mrs. George J. Kimmerer 
Richard G. Klemdienst hc'73 
Mr & Mrs. Donald F. Koenecke 
'Daniel G. Kohler 
Mr & Mrs. John J. Koval 
Mr & Mrs. William H. Kozlowski 
*Mr & Mrs. Alfred J Krahmer h'67 
Margaret J. Krapf 
Dr. & Mrs. Emil Kratzman 
Mr. & Mrs. William H. Krechman 
Mr. & Mrs David E Kreh 
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Kuba 
Mr. & Mrs. John C. Kuhn Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. John N. Ladley 
Mr. & Mrs. Walter Lancton 
"Eleanor Robison Landes h'60 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Landi 
Mr. & Mrs. Kermit L. LaRose 
Mr & Mrs James Lawrence 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Lawser Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Rolla E. Lehman II 
"Richard C. Leib 
"Mrs. J. Edward Lenker 
Martha Leonard 
Mr. & Mrs. Howard L. Letts 
Mr & Mrs. Alvin Levkoff 
Mr. & Mrs. William C. Little Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Waldemar V. Littlefield 
Mr & Mrs. Donald Littlejohn 
Mr. & Mrs. Augustine J. Lodise 
Patricia L. Loney 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry E. Long 
Mr & Mrs. Robert Lengenberger 
Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin Lotz hc'61 
George O. Machlan 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles MacKinney 
Mr & Mrs. John E. Madison 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Mafera 
Mr & Mrs. W. R. Main 
Mr. & Mrs. Serge A. Manni 
Mr. & Mrs, Charles Mansir 
Mr & Mrs. David H. Marshall 
Mr. & Mrs. Calvin Marshall 
Mr & Mrs. Joseph A. Martin 
Mr. & Mrs. William C. Martz 
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Maurer 
Mr. & Mrs. Elwood M. McAllister 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. McAndrew 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles G. McBride 
C. Edward McCracken 
Mr & Mrs. Eugene McCurdy 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles V. McGlyn 
'Thomas F. McGrath h'69 
Mr & Mrs. James McGuire 
Mr. & Mrs. William G. McKenna 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Meany 
Maria Miscavage 
Mr & Mrs. Robert M. Milford 
Darlene Miller 
Mr & Mrs. Don Miller 
Mr, & Mrs. James G. Miller 
Mr & Mrs Kenneth J. Miller 
Mr. & Mrs. John L. Molla 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Montague 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Moore 
Mr & Mrs. Edward Morgan 
Mr. & Mrs. Morris R. Mosteller 
Mr. & Mrs. Floyd Mutchler 
Elizabeth R. Myers 
*Mr, & Mrs. Andrew Nalepa 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Newson Jr. 
"Mr & Mrs. Charles A. Nicely h'35 
Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore M. Nicolosi 
Mr & Mrs. Frederick A. Nolte 
Robert E. Nylund h'69 
Mr. & Mrs. David E. Ober 
Mr. & Mrs. George Odell 
John J. Olcese 
Mr & Mrs. Kenneth E. Orris 
Mr & Mrs. N. Eugene Otto 
Mr & Mrs. Walter E. Owens 
Mr & Mrs. Albert D. Paglia 
David L Painter 

Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Pappianou 
Mr & Mrs. Donald I. Parsels 
Roy E. Paulas 
Louis L. Pearce 



Frank M. Petre Jr. 
Mr & Mrs. Jefferson J. Pierson 
Rudolph Pikna 
Mr. & Mrs. Ray D Pile 
Mr. & Mrs. Emil M. Piontek 
Mr. & Mrs. Franklin A. Pitcock 
Mr, & Mrs. Fred A. Place 
Mr. & Mrs. John B. Poliero 
Mr. & Mrs. W. S. Powelson 
Mr & Mrs. William J. Powers 
Mr & Mrs. Joseph Prekopa 
Bruce D. Pressor 
Mr. & Mrs. Anton Pritsch 
"Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Pruitt 
Mr & Mrs. Thomas C Quinn 
Joan Rager 

Mr & Mrs. K. A. Rahlfs 
Charles A. Rahter h'67 
James A. Railton 
Ida W. Rattelman 
"Joseph L. Ray h'67 
John M. Reade III h"68 
Guido Recchia 
Mr & Mrs. John S Redpath 
•Robert U. Redpath Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Curtis G. Reed 
Mr. & Mrs. James R. Reed 
Mr & Mrs. Joseph Reichenbach 
•Richard A. Reiland 
Evelyn Reinhard 
*Otto Reimherr h'67 
"Harold H. Reunmg 
Mr & Mrs. John Reyle 
Mr & Mrs Charles J. Rice 
Mr & Mrs. Thomas M. Riley 
Philip B. Robeson 
Mary Robinson 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Robinson 
Mary Rocks 
•Allen H. Roth 
•Henry W. Rozenberg hc'73 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Ruby Jr. 
Mr & Mrs. Raymond J. Ruff 
Mrs. Robert T. Rungee 
Mr. & Mrs. S. H. Runyon 
Mr & Mrs. Dean E. Rupe 
Mr. & Mrs. Philip S. Rust 
Mr & Mrs. Morton Samuels 
Dr & Mrs. Daniel H. Sandstedt hc'74 
Mr. & Mrs. Peter Sarf 
Joyce E. Sauers 
Elizabeth Saxe 
Mr. & Mrs. Earl Saxton 
"Robert E. Schellberg hc'70 
The Rev. & Mrs. Theodore Schlack 
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth E. Schlegel 
Mr, & Mrs. Arthur Schlumpf 
Rose Marie Schluter 
John H. Schneider 
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Schnell 
Mr. & Mrs. Ora W. Schneider 
•Dr & Mrs. Jacob Schnitman 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry M. Schoenly 
Glenn P. Schwalm 
Mr & Mrs, Richard Schwartz 
Mr. & Mrs. Valentine Schwartz 
Mr & Mrs. Richard Schwarz 
Mr. & Mrs. Schweingruber 
Mr & Mrs. Frear H. Scovell 
William J. Seaton 
Mr, & Mrs. Delbert Seifert 
Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Selman 
•Mr & Mrs. Paul C. Shatto Jr 
•Paul C. Shatto Sr. 
Mr, & Mrs. Robert M. Sheaffer 
Mr & Mrs. Peter Sherman 
Mr. & Mrs. George W. Shroyer 
Mr. & Mrs. John B. Sill Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Erwin M. Simpson 
Mr. & Mrs. Carl Sims 
Mr. & Mrs. A. V. Sinkosky 
Mr, & Mrs. Robert E. Slocum 
Mr & Mrs. Harvey R. Smeltz 
Mr & Mrs. Carl Smith 
Mr & Mrs. Robert N. Smith 
Ruth B. Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick T, Snider 
B. Rex Snyder 
Mr, & Mrs. F, M. Snyder Jr. 
Gerald Snyder 
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Snyder 
Mr & Mrs. Robert Somerfield 
Gudrun B. Sorrell 
Mr & Mrs. Edward M Sosik 
Mr & Mrs. Norton Spence 
Pat Squillante 
Mr. & Mrs. George Stagnittl 
Mr. & Mrs. William P. Staker 
Albert P. Stauderman hc'73 
•Catherine E. Steltz h'68 



Mr. & Mrs- Richard H. Steltz 
Dr. & Mrs. Franklin Stevens 

*L. Naomi Steward 
Vi Stiles 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Stine Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. George Storey 
Mr & Mrs- Jerry S Stover 
Mr. S Mrs. Stewart Strausbaugh 
Mr 8 Mrs. Frank E. Strehle 
Mr & Mrs. Paul H. Strehle 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul H. Strehle Jr. 
Fredrica H. Stringfellow 
Mr & Mrs. Joseph W. Strode Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. James H. Strohecker 
Mr. & Mrs. Don Strytteler 
Mr. & Mrs. James Sutherland 
Mr. & Mrs. Harold Swartz 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F Sweatiock 
Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Sweetapple 
Helen K. Szwed 

Mr. & Mrs. George R.F. Tamke h'67 
Mr, & Mrs. H. E. Tanneberger 
Amanda Thomas 
Mr & Mrs. John H. Thomas 
Mr & Mrs Richard A. Thornburg 
Mr & Mrs. Albert R. Thorson 
Miss Pat Thumann 
Mr. & Mrs. Francis Timmons 
"Mr & Mrs Leo M. Toccket 
Mr. & Mrs. John Trojan 

*Dr. & Mrs. Whitney M. Trousdale 

'S. Prentiss Turnbach 
Dr & Mrs. George A. Ulrich 
Mr. & Mrs. Henry Ulrich 
Mr. & Mrs. O R Van Clse 
Mr & Mrs. H Everett Vennell 
Albert H. Vermillion 
Mr. & Mrs Eric Vessey 
Louis R Vincenzes 
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Von Heyn 
Mr. & Mrs. Theodore F Voss Jr 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Wagenseil 
Betty W Wagner 
Mr. & Mrs. John Walker 

•Mr & Mrs. Norman E. Walz h"67 
"Alan C. Warehime 
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick E. Warth 
Mr & Mrs. John Waverczak 

'Howard H, Weaner Jr 
"Dr and Mrs. Gustave W Weber h'64 
Mr & Mrs. Robert P. Weber 
Dr. & and Mrs. H. C. Wegman 
Mr & Mrs. Harold L Weikel 
"Robert F Weis 
Mr & Mrs. Francis A Weisbecker 
Mr. & Mrs. C. Robert Wells 
Mr & Mrs Walter R West 
Mr & Mrs William A, Wetteroth 
Dan A. Wheaton 
Mr & Mrs Jay W White* 

'Mr & Mrs Homer W Wieder Jr 
Mr & Mrs Emory B Wildasin 
Mr. & Mrs Thomas R. Wissinger 
Mr S Mrs Ernest C Woener 

•Mr & Mrs Gerhard Wolf 
William A. Wray Sr. 
Mr. & Mrs Harry S Wright 
Mr & Mrs George T. Xanthls 
Mr 5 Mrs Ernest Yelencsics 
Mr. & Mrs. William W Yoder 
Mr & Mrs. Victor R. Young 
Dr & Mrs. Bernard Zackon 
Dr & Mrs Edmund L Zapp 
Mr & Mrs. Eugene R. Zehner 
Mr. & Mrs. J P. Zelgler 



CORPORATIONS 
AND FOUNDATIONS 

Aetna Life & Casualty Co. 

'Alrco. Inc 

Alcoa Foundation 
"Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Co 

•American Telephone & Telegraph 
"AMP, Inc. 

'Armstrong Cork Co. 

'Arthur Anderson & Co. 

Atlantic Richfield Foundation 

'Becker Motor Co. 
"Bethlehem Steel Corp. 

*BKW Coach Lines 

•Buiova Watch Co. Foundation 
"Butter Krust Baking Co. 
"Campbell Soup Co 
"Carpenter Foundation 
Chrysler Corp. 

•Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co 
"Continental Telephone Co 



"The Daily Item 
"J C Decker Co. 

Deering Milllken Service Corp. 

Dun & Bradstreet Group Cos. 

Duro-Test Corp. 
"Equitable Life Assurance Co 
"Ernst & Ernst 
**S. H. Evert Co. 
'Exxon Education Foundation 
"Faylor-Middlecreek. Inc. 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 

First National City Bank 
"First National Trust Bank 
"Ford Motor Co 

"Foundation for Independent Colleges 
'Gerber Baby Foods 

Girard Bank 
"Albert F Goetze Foundation 

W T. Grant Co. 
"Grit Publishing Co. 
"Gulf Oil Corp. 
"Hagedorn Fund 
"Hanover Brands, Inc. 
•Jack Helm Ford, Inc. 

Hercules. Inc. 

Hershey Foods Corp 

'Household Finance Corp. 

International Business Machines 

•Johnson & Johnson 
"Lindback Foundation 
"Mandata Poultry 
"Mary Mcintosh Services 

•McGraw-Edison Co. 

"McGraw Hill, Inc. 

Mellon National Bank & Trust Co. 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. 
"National Science Foundation 
"Nationwide insurance Co. 

*Olm Corp. 
"Ottaway Foundation 

*Ott Packagings. Inc. 

Peai. Marwick. Mitchell Foundation 
"Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 

Pennwalt Foundation 

•Phillips Fuel Co. 
"Presser Foundation 

Price Waterhouse & Co. 

Prudential Insurance Co of America 

'Richardson Merrell, Inc. 

•Rohm & Haas Co. 

SCM Corp. 

'Scott Paper Co. 
"Sears Roebuck Foundation 

"Selmsgrove Fuel Co 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 

'Sperry & Hutchison Co. 

'Squibb Beech-Nut. Inc. 

'Stackpole Carbon Co 
Stone & Webster, Inc. 
"Swmeford National Bank 

•Textron Charitable Trust 
"TRW Foundation 
United Illuminating Co 

•United States Borax & Chemical Co. 
"Wagner & Hartman Associates 
"Margaret L. Wendt Foundation 
"Weis Markets, Inc. 
"R. B. Witmer & Co. 
"Wood-Metal industries 



CHURCHES AND 
ORGANIZATIONS 

"Aid Association for Lutherans 
"Appalachian Regional Commission 
"Central Pennsylvania Synod. Lutheran 

Church in America 
"Class of 1974 
"Department of Health, Education & 

Welfare 
"Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Hershey 
"Lutheran Brotherhood 
"Lutheran Church in America 
"Mental Health/Mental Retardation 
"National Science Foundation 

Redeemer Lutheran Church, Williamsport 
*St. James Parish, Dallas, Texas 

St. John's Lutheran Church, Beltefonte 
"St Matthew's Lutheran Church. York 

St Paul's Church. Philadelphia 
"Sharon Lutheran Church. Selinsgrove 
"Sunbury Rotary Club 
"Susquehanna University Student 

Government 
"Susquehanna University Women's 

Auxiliary 

Trinity Lutheran Church. Camp Hill 
"Trinity Lutheran Church. Johnstown 



BEQUESTS TO THE UNIVERSITY 

THE MEANING of bequests to Susquehanna University cannot be 
overemphasized. Throughout the years men and women of varied 
backgrounds and means have reaffirmed their faith in the future of 
the University by providing substance to the educational program 
through the use of the will. Over the years the University has 
received bequests ranging from $100 to $500,000. and each has 
played a significant role in the advancement of the University. 

During the fiscal year July 1. 1973 through June 30, 1974 ad- 
ditional bequests totaling more than $125,000 have been received. 
The University wishes to recognize these benefactors, since the 
funds they have provided will serve to strengthen the long-range 
educational programs of Susquehanna. 

The Estate of Chalmers E. Frontz, a member of the Class of 1896 
and a resident of Selinsgrove. provided that 2 percent of his 
residuary estate should be given to Susquehanna University for 
general endowment purposes. 

The Estate of Miller Gerhardt, a member of the Class of 1930. 
provided that one-half of his total estate after expenses should be left 
to Susquehanna University to become a part of the University's 
fund for general use. 

The Estate of J. Edward Lenker, a resident of Sunbury, Pa. and 
former member of the Susquehanna University Board of Directors, 
directed that a substantial portion of his estate be given to the 
University to establish the Ruth Lenker Hunter Reading Room in 
the Roger M. Blough Learning Center in memory of his daughter. 

The Estate of W. Ralph Wagenseller, a member of the Class of 
1900, left a portion of his estate unrestricted to be used as deemed 
appropriate by the Board of Directors of Susquehanna University. 



MATCHING CONTRIBUTORS 

THE UNIVERSITY wishes to recognize these companies' 
matching gifts of employees to Susquehanna University for the 
period July 1. 1973 through June 30, 1974. Corporate Matching Gift 
Programs provide a vital source of funds for higher education and 
serve to double the value of the employee's donation. Please check 
to see if your employer is one of more than 450 with Matching Gift 
Programs. 



Aetna Life & Casualty Co. 
*Airco, Inc. 
Alcoa Foundation 
"Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Co. 
•American Telephone & Telegraph 
'Armstrong Cork Co. 
'Arthur Anderson & Co 
Atlantic Richfield Foundation 
"Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
•Buiova Watch Co Foundation 
"Campbell Soup Co. 
"Carpenter Foundation 
Chrysler Corp. 

•Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co 
Deering Milliken Service Corp. 
Dun a Bradstreet Group Cos. 
"Equitable Life Assurance Co. 
"Exxon Education Foundation 
"Firestone Tire & Rubber Co 

First National City Bank 
"Ford Motor Co 
•Gerber Baby Foods 
Girard Bank 
W.T Grant Co. 
"Gulf Oil Corp 
Hercules, Inc. 
Hershey Foods Corp. 



International Business Machines 

Irving One Wall Street Foundation. Inc. 
•Johnson & Johnson 
•McGraw-Edison Co. 
•McGraw Hill, Inc. 

Mellon National Bank 4 Trust Co. 

Mutual Benefit Lite Insurance Co. 
"Nationwide Insurance Co. 
•Olin Corp. 

Peat. Marwick, Mitchell Foundation 
"Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 

Pennwalt Foundation 

Price Waterhouse & Co. 

Prudential Insurance Co of America 
'Richardson Merrell. Inc. 
•Rohm & Haas Co, 

SCM Corp. 
•Scott Paper Co 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
•Sperry & Hutchison Co. 
'Squibb Beech-Nut. Inc. 
•Stackpole Carbon Co. 

Stone & Webster, inc. 
•Textron Charitable Trust 

United Illuminating Co. 
•United States Borax & Chemical Co. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1974-75 



C.THOMAS AIKENS II 

Publisher. The Centre Daily Times, State College, Pa. 

JOHN B. APPLE 

Vice President. Butter Krust Baking Co.. Sunbury, Pa. 

DOUGLAS E. ARTHUR '49 

Vice President. Nationwide Insurance Cos., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dr. ROGER M. BLOUGH, Esq., Vice Chairman 

Attorney at Law. White & Case, New York City 

The Rev. Dr. F. WILLIAM BRANDT 

Retired Pastor, Altoona, Pa., 

WILLIAM R. BURCHFIELD 

President, J.C. Decker, Inc.. Montgomery. Pa. 

Dr. LEONARD F. BUSH hc'70 

Retired Chief of Staff, Geisinger Medical Center, 

Danville, Pa. 

HARRY W. BUTTS '48 

Philadelphia Regional Manager. Burroughs Corp., 

Wayne. Pa. 

Dr. ALVIN W. CARPENTER, Esq. '24, Secretary 

Attorney at Law. Carpenter, Carpenter & Diehl. 

Sunbury, Pa. 

Dr. JOHN A. CARPENTER, Esq. 

Attorney at Law, Carpenter, Carpenter & Diehl, 

Sunbury, Pa. 

The Hon. PRESTON B. DAVIS, Esq. 

Attorney at Law, Davis & Davis, Milton, Pa. 

SAMUEL H. EVERT 

President, S. H. Evert Co., Bloomsburg, Pa. 

WILLIAM O. FAYLOR Sr. 

President, Faylor-Middlecreek Co.. Winfield, Pa. 

FRANK K. FETTEROLF '48 

Vice President, Thomas-Kinzey Lumber Co., 

Johnstown, Pa. 

The Rev. DAVID N. FINNEY Jr. 

Pastor, Trinity Lutheran Church, Johnstown, Pa. 

Dr. LAWRENCE C. FISHER '31 

Ophthalmologist, York, Pa. 

W. DONALD FISHER '51 

Certified Public Accountant, Selinsgrove, Pa. 

DONALD H. FOELSCH '53 

Chemist. Glyco Chemicals. Inc., Williamsport, Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. WALTER B. FREED 

Pastor. Lutheran Church of the Reformation. 

Rochester. N.Y. 

Dr. GYNITHC. GIFFIN 

Professor of Chemistry, Susquehanna University, 

Selinsgrove. Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. A. ROGER GOBBEL 

Director of Continuing Education Lutheran Theological 

Seminary. Gettysburg, Pa. 

ROBERT C. GOETZE 

Executive Vice President, Albert F. Goetze. Inc., 

Baltimore. Md. 

Dr. JOHN C. HORN hc'65. Chairman 

Executive Director, Church Management Services 

Huntingdon, Pa. 



ORLANDO W. HOUTS 

President. O.W. Houts & Sons. State College. Pa. 

LAWRENCE M. ISAACS '43 

Vice President-Finance. Allis-Chalmers Corp., 

Fox Point. Wis. 

HENRY J. KEIL '39 

President. Henry Keil, & Sons. Leonia, N.J. 

The Rev. Dr. RICHARD C. KLICK 

Pastor. St. Paul's Lutheran Church, York. Pa. 

The Rev. PAUL B. LUCAS '28 

Retired Pastor. Chambersburg. Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. RICHARD B. MARTIN, Emeritus 

Retired Pastor. Brevard, N.C. 

The Rev. Dr. HOWARD J. McCARNEY 

President, Central Pennsylvania Synod, LCA, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

CHARLES A. NICELY h'35. Emeritus 

Retired Businessman, Watsontown. Pa. 

JOSEPH L. RAY h'67 

Investment Broker. Sunbury, Pa. 

ROBERT U. REDPATH, Jr. 

Certified Life Underwriter, New York City 

EDWARD S. ROGERS '42 

Research Engineer, RCA Corp., Yardley, Pa. 

SAMUEL D. ROSS 

Vice President. Pennsylvania Blue Shield, Carlisle, Pa. 

Dr. HENRY W. ROZENBERG hc'73. Emeritus 

Retired Engineer. Jersey Shore, Pa. 

WILLIAM R. RUHL '49 

Principal, Lewisburg Area Junior High School, 

Lewisburg. Pa. 

JACK P. SHIPE'40 

Retired Toy Manufacturer, Herndon, Pa. 

Dr. ERLE I. SHOBERT II '35. Vice Chairman 

Vice President-Research. Stackpole Carbon Co., 

St. Marys, Pa. 

CARL H. SIMON 

Retired Businessman. Sun City. Ariz. 

W. ALFRED STREAMER '26. Emeritus 

Retired Businessman. State College. Pa. 

NORMAN E. WALZ h'67. Treasurer 

President. First National Trust Bank, Sunbury. Pa. 

ALAN R. WAREHIME 

President, Hanover Brands, Inc.. Hanover, Pa. 

Dr. GUSTAVE W. WEBER h'64 

President. Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

ROBERT F. WEIS 

Vice President and Treasurer. Weis Markets. Inc., 

Sunbury, Pa. 

RALPH WITMER 15 

Chairman of the Board. Snyder County Trust Co.. 

Selinsgrove. Pa. 



Concerns About Admissions 

A SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS INTERVIEW 

WITH PAUL W. BEARDSLEE, DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 



What is the current status 

of admissions at Susquehanna? 

Frankly, I would describe our feelings about Susquehan- 
na's admissions picture and its future as one of guarded op- 
timism. There are many plus factors at the University — its 
faculty, its students, its campus, and its programs. Also, when 
we review our experience of this past year we have to take 
heart. As is now common knowledge in most circles on cam- 
pus, we not only acquired our desired enrollment for 1974. but 
we actually surpassed our goal by nearly 30 students. In a 
time when so many private colleges are experiencing enroll- 
ment declines, we have to feel encouraged that Susquehanna 
was not in that boat. 

However, we do not feel all that comfortable that we can 
sit back and watch future classes fill. As is also common 
knowledge, we "landed" our class from a declining pool of 
applicants. This year's total was some 140 applications fewer 
than last year and last year's total represented a decline from 
the previous year. While it was most gratifying that our 
yield — the number who enrolled from those admitted — made 
a turnabout, we are apprehensive about the future. It seems 
clear that our prime goal must be one of reversing this skid- 
ding application trend. 

Last year, I indicated that improving our yield would be 
our goal for 1974. That being accomplished is heartening and 
speaks to my optimism. We remain "guarded" or "cautious" 
simply because a diminishing pool of applicants might very 
well cause student quality to suffer in the future. 

What are the prospects 

for increasing 

the number of applicants? 

This is a difficult question to answer with any high degree 
of certainty. As I indicated earlier, many colleges are ex- 
periencing enrollment problems and almost all are witnessing 
declining volumes of applications. This is certainly the case 
among our competitors. Frankly, I do not foresee any early 
change in this latter trend nationally. After all, there are 
fewer college-bound students to begin with and each of these 
will submit fewer applications than once was the case. 
Although I will not elaborate at this point, societal shifts have 
changed our situation from a "seller's" market to a 
"buyer's." Consequently, the axioms, parameters, guidelines 



28 



of the '60s are no longer appropriate tools. In sum. the "selec- 
tive" syndrome of a decade ago has been replaced by a keen 
competition for students. 

This might suggest that we have little hope for increasing 
our number of applicants. Such, however, is not necessarily 
true, for several steps have been and will be taken to offset this 
year's experience. We have added another staff member, per- 
mitting us to visit at least 25 percent more schools and provide 
more personal contact. It will be our hope that although there 
are fewer applicants sending fewer applications, we will be 
able to contact more of those students and, in return, stand a 
better chance of being one of the colleges to which they make 
application. 

In short, our mission will be increased personal contact 
in as many areas as possible. We want to utilize our con- 
stituency — students, faculty, administration, alumni, friends 
— more fully than ever before. Efforts are underway to in- 
crease the options and opportunities for campus visits, both 
by individuals and groups. Already, a program is being es- 
tablished to bring youth groups, church groups, etcetera, to 
the campus. The thrust of this program will be an introduc- 
tion to college in general. Admissions (recruiting) involve- 
ment will be indirect only and will probably focus on 
providing student tour guides/aides, and so forth. 

What do you hope will be accomplished 
through such ventures? 

With competition for students increasing, and the pool 
declining, we must make ourselves more visible. Increasing 
school visits and "on the road" contact we hope will increase 
the awareness of Susquehanna. Thus, we would hope the 
amount of interest in Susquehanna would increase. Ifthiscan 
then be followed by increasing the volume of campus visiting, 
we think positive results will be forthcoming. 

It has been my personal experience and Susquehanna's 
experience that our "rate of return" is much better from those 
who visit. Certainly, therefore, increasing the options and op- 
portunities for visiting makes sense simply because the Sus- 
quehanna campus and its constituents have something to sell. 
Indeed, it is the campus, its faculty, and its students that do 
the selling. I am convinced that more awareness of and more 
exposure to the University will enhance our status in the long 
haul. The change will not be dramatic in a single year, 
however. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 







What attracts students 
to a particular college? 

Certainly there is no single factor. We have found, 
however, that while guidance counselors and parents are still 
involved, it is the student — in many cases a more sophisti- 
cated student, one more sure of himself or herself — who 
makes the choice. In questioning our incoming classes, 
several factors stand out. First: a student is drawn to the 
University by a program we offer in which he is interested; the 
high regard held for our music and business programs will 
serve as an illustration. Second: the overall academic reputa- 
tion of the college is important, as is proximity to home. Most 
of our students come from within a 200-mile radius of 
Selinsgrove. Some will be attracted by our rural campus, 
some by various cocurricular programs. The importance of 
facilities cannot be ignored either. Most students have ex- 
perienced excellent secondary school facilities and expect the 
same here. Fortunately, Susquehanna has good facilities and 
an accommodating campus. The only exceptions would be 
the need for a more adequate physical education facility and 
the refurbishing of our two oldest dorms. On the drawing 
board now, of course, is the addition to Alumni Gym. 

We should not ignore our current students in the process. 



As suggested earlier, they are our best salesmen. If they have 
a good experience here, they tell their friends. Peer influence 
does carry positive impact. 

Is there one overriding 
factor of importance? 

It appears to us that the basic factor in choosing a college 
is the quality of the academic program offered. We must 
remember that Susquehanna is one of several hundred small, 
private colleges in the East having similar size and 
characteristics. What makes us attractive is a combination of 
the factors just cited, but most importantly, our academic 
program. We are definitely doing some things that attract 
students, including an increasing number of transfers each 
year. For example, our quality programs in music, business, 
and the sciences have been consistent drawing cards to Sus- 
quehanna over the years. In the humanities and social 
sciences, we now offer internships and other forms of off- 
campus learning experiences which have real appeal to 
students. The chance to study at the United Nations, the 
Junior Year Abroad, the urban semesters in Harrisburg or 
Baltimore, a growing Environmental Studies program, are 
all features attractive to students. Susquehanna is moving in 



FALL 1974 



29 



the front ranks in many of these areas. My hope, of course, is 
that we will be able to do a more thorough job of com- 
municating what we have available to an even larger audience 
as we go along. 

What type of student 

is Susquehanna looking for? 

I really dislike this kind of question, for I am not quite 
certain that there is a specific kind of student we should seek. 
After all, a broad cross-section amongst our students adds 
considerable breadth to Susquehanna's definition of the 
Liberal Arts. As diversification increases, so does the poten- 
tial for a diversified educational experience increase. 
Nevertheless, there are characteristics that would fairly ac- 
curately describe our average student. 

For the most part, and as I mentioned earlier, most of 
our students are from the East (88 percent of our current 
freshman class comes from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and 
New York). Roughly 75 percent ranked in the upper two- 
fifths of their secondary school classes, and their SAT scores 
averaged approximately 500 on the Verbal section and 540 on 
the Math section. This has been our recent experience, 
although we are now beginning to see the same trends that are 
occurring nationally on standardized exams, namely a 
decline. 

I would hasten to add that in reviewing a candidate, all 
factors are taken into consideration and, on occasion, some 
will be more important for one student than they will be for 
others. Such cases frequently develop in specialty areas. By 
and large the student's record of achievement over his or her 
high school years is the most important factor. The last two 



years are even more vital, for growth here usually indicates 
positive motivation and desire. Second in importance would 
be a combination of the student's cocurricular/community 
activity record and his school's overall assessment of his/her 
achievements and contributions. Standardized test results, in 
my opinion, fall somewhere behind these other, more per- 
sonal factors. There is absolutely no question in my mind that 
promise as a student and promise as a person involve much 
more than scores. 

Since Susquehanna is a small school located in a rural 
setting, I view this approach as vital to our existence. To re- 
main viable and meaningful, Susquehanna needs students 
who are people, not numbers that are impressive on print- 
outs. We are alive not only because out students are here to 
benefit from a solid college education, but also to contribute 
to that experience and that campus along the way. While 
promise for academic success might be present, we consider 
the human element essential for our kind of institution. 

Should only those students 
who meet the criteria just cited 
bother to apply for admission? 

As I mentioned before, our student body hopefully 
possesses many characteristics. In a real sense, we are not en- 
couraging the well-rounded student, but rather the "lop- 
sided" one, if you'll allow such a description. With the proper 
melding, we end up with a well-rounded student body. 

I would hope that such an answer would not be con- 
sidered critically for what I am really saying is that we hate to 
discourage any sincere student from inquiring about admis- 
sion to the University. After all, the circumstances of each in- 





30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



dividual differ and career and educational goals vary greatly. 
We certainly urge each student to talk with his guidance 
counselor, who can assist in matching student and institution. 
A large part of our own school visiting is to make certain that 
counselors know what attributes are important when 
applicants are reviewed. 

We also strongly urge students to visit us, to "try us on." 
While interviews are not required, the exchange of informa- 
tion that occurs is extremely helpful to the student in deter- 
mining whether Susquehanna is the kind of place in which he 
will want to spend four rather vital and expensive years of his 
life. Whether a student is at the serious stage of college in- 
quiry or is just a casual shopper, we strongly recommend the 
campus visit. We are here to help — not to hinder — and quite 
frankly, if a student's best interests are not our first interests, 
we shouldn't be here. There is but one step that I urge 
everyone to take: please make appointments in advance! 

Is preference given 
to children of alumni? 

An easy answer here would be to simply say yes. 
However, if that were all that we said, we would contradict all 
that we said earlier. In truth, we will employ the same 
parameters cited — we want to serve the student's best in- 
terests in all cases. "Is Susquehanna the right college for your 
son or daughter? Can he or she make the grade here, or would 
we really do a greater disservice by granting admission?" 
These questions are raised in all cases. Anything less would be 
insulting to all involved. 

Obviously, a blanket admission policy for children of 
alumni would make for fewer public relations problems, at 




least at the outset. I would suspect, however, that in the long 
haul we would create more problems than we would solve, 
and some wounds might never heal. I have seen far too many 
instances where such a blanket policy or a "loosening of the 
parameters" resulted in a considerable waste of time and 
money. In many cases, aspirations, motivations, even per- 
sonalities were seriously eroded or severely damaged. 

The record, however, involving the admission of alumni 
children to Susquehanna University is impressive. Of the 20 
who applied for admission this fall, 19 were admitted, and 17 
enrolled. I definitely feel we should encourage alumni 
children to visit with us to discuss their future plans. In fact, I 
would even go so far as to solicit their inquiry. We are ear- 
marking our Saturday morning group sessions on Home- 
coming and Alumni Weekends for just that purpose. Whether 
the inquiry is about higher education in general or Sus- 
quehanna in particular, we are here to serve and to help in 
choosing the right school. Naturally, we will hope that many 
will want to choose their parents' alma mater in the process. 

How can alumni help 
the admissions office? 

More and more colleges are actively involving their 
alumni in the admissions process. In our recent past, we have 
utilized the services of eight or ten of our alumni in covering 
college night programs and contacting students in the areas 
who have made application to the University. All alumni can 
assist by encouraging students to consider Susquehanna or 
they can forward names and we will follow up. 

While it is doubtful that a highly sophisticated alumni- 
admissions program such as exists at some Ivy League 
schools will develop in the near future, we are planning to ex- 
plore — and hopefully, implement — means of expanding our 
present alumni-admissions program. Jim Skinner will be 
handling this segment of our operation and we hope that time 
for this exploration can be set aside after our heavy travel 
season ends. Initially, I would suspect that the inclusion of 
more contact persons will be our prime concern. 

Has the rising cost of a college education 
hurt the admissions program at 
Susquehanna? 

There is no question that the national economic picture 
has had a negative impact on higher education, most especial- 
ly upon the private institutions. As long as our society ex- 
periences this unstable economy, we will be facing concerning 
times. 

While Susquehanna's costs are moderate, we are still 
talking about a yearly expenditure approaching $4000. My 
real fear is that many private colleges are going to price 
themselves beyond the capacity of the middle income family. 
The tragedy of this is obvious, for it is this segment of society 
that makes up the bulk of our constituency. As I mentioned 
earlier, we hope to attract a broad socio-economic student 
body, which becomes increasingly difficult with spiraling 
costs. 



FALL 1974 



31 




Assistant directors of admissions are Jim Skinner '64, 
Susan Staggers and. below. Wendy McMahan. The Admissions 
House is now located at 512 University Avenue. 




On the positive side, Federal and state financial aid 
programs are being liberalized, which suggests increasing 
recognition that the middle income family is bearing the 
brunt. Susquehanna makes every effort to provide ap- 
propriate adjustments as costs increase but our sources are 
not unlimited. 

The Admissions Office works closely with the director of 
financial aid to assure that adequate aid packages are con- 
structed to accommodate those students who enter the 
University with financial need. The aid decision is always 
made after the admission decision has been rendered. To 
date, we have been successful in providing adequate aid for all 
those having a need and Federal and state programs have 
been increasingly helpful. You can rest assured that we will 
continue in this vein as long as possible. Here again, I urge in- 
quiries and visits to the campus to discuss the various finan- 
cial aid opportunities available at Susquehanna. Ed McCor- 
mick, our director of financial aid, has all the information at 
his disposal and spends many hours reviewing files and 
assisting students in seeking out viable aid sources. 

As is the case at most colleges, Susquehanna employs the 
services of the College Scholarship Service in Princeton, New 
Jersey. Through the use of the Parents' Confidential State- 
ment, provided and evaluated by this service, a student's need 




to attend the University is determined. While this form is 
standardized and is certainly not a perfect solution, the for- 
mula it employs does attempt to include varying family cir- 
cumstances in its consideration. To date, we have found this 
approach to be the most equitable to all. 

Do you have any additional comments 
on your "guarded optimism"? 

In this day of inflation, rising costs, and so on, many 
students and parents are reluctant to commit themselves to a 
four-year college education. The present uncertainty of 
employment opportunities and the growing feeling that 
college is not worth the effort do nothing to counter the reluc- 
tance. Certainly, not every high school graduate should go to 
college and we definitely endorse the "stopping out" idea for 
some others. Getting a better "handle" on one's sense of 
direction before going on to college often brings to us a more 
serious and mature student. 

But the worth of a college education must be predicted 
on future plans and the career goals of each individual. I am 
absolutely certain that "college" will continue to hold a high 
place in our society, most especially if new programs develop 
that speak to changing societal trends and demands. 

My confidence that Susquehanna will remain among 
those in that high place is unshakable. The University offers a 
solid and broad educational program based upon a sound 
liberal education philosophy. There is enthusiasm for what 
we are and the review and introduction of new programs is 
continuous. I believe we possess the flexibility and adaptabili- 
ty to accommodate innovation and new ideas. We are con- 
temporary and worth the expense. When we consider the 
complexities of today's society. I not only feel that a college 
education is needed, but the kind of broad liberal education 
we provide has become more essential now than ever before. 

As we embark upon expanding our horizons and our 
contacts and as we improve upon our communications and 
sense of community. I think we will attract our share of 
qualified students. I do not anticipate dramatic changes over- 
night, but we have the tools to start the game. I might add that 
no helping hand will be refused. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Advanced Degrees 



Timothy W. Bingman '72: M. A. in 
English. Bucknell University. 

Carol Ann Bringman '37: M.Ed, in 
counselor education, Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Ann Herdle Cain '73: M.A.T., Universi- 
ty of Pittsburgh. She is teaching chemistry 
at Shaler Area Sr. H.S., Pittsburgh. 

John B Carey Jr. '72: M.B.A., Penn- 
sylvania State University. 

Frederica L. Conrad '66: Ph.D. in psy- 
chology. Pennsylvania State University. 

David J. Deak '71: M.S. in physics, 
Bucknell University. 

Clifford I Edogun '72: M.A. in political 
science. Drew University. He worked in 
Washington, D. C. over the summer and 
plans to pursue the doctorate at Rutgers 
University. 

C. Dale Galeman '52: Ed.D. in educa- 
tional administration. Teachers College, 
Columbia University. He is principal of 
Marshall Hill School in West Milford, 
N.J. and lives with his wife, the former 
Shirley Decker x'55. and their two children 
at 442 Pines Lake Dr. E., Wayne, N.J. 
07470. 

John E Gormley '71: J.D., Duquesne 
University School of Law. A first lieute- 
nant in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves he 
has reported to Quantico, Va. for a four- 
year tour of active duty. 

Donald B Green '70: M. Div., Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Gettysburg. He is 
pastor of St. John Lutheran, Hummels- 
town, and Zion Lutheran, Union Deposit, 
Pa. 

Dennis K. Hall '70: M. Div., Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Gettysburg. In his 
senior year he won the Colonel Arno Von 
Koenneritz Memorial Scholarship from the 
Lutheran Church in American Foundation. 
He is pastor of St. John Lutheran Church, 
Maytown, Pa. 

Genetle A. Henderson '66: M.A.T., 
Rutgers University. She teaches Spanish in 
Middletown, N.J. 

C. Scott Hoffman '71: M.S., University 
of Virginia, Department of Environmental 
Science. 

Margaret E Isaacson '70: M.A. in 
counseling. Rider College. She is assistant 
director of career development and place- 
ment at Bloomsburg State College, Pa. 

Gerald F. Kling x'63: Ph.D., Cornell 
University, where he also earned the M.S. 
degree and was granted an Environmental 
Protection Agency predoctoral fellowship 
to continue his research. In 1971 he received 
the Scarseth Scholarship presented by the 



American Society of Agronamy. He is 
assis ant professor of soil science at Oregon 
State University. 

Rolla E. Lehman 111 '71 : master's degree 
in music. Converse College. He and his 
wife, the former Jean Walton '73, have 
returned to Selinsgrove, where Rolla is 
again teaching vocal music in the Selins- 
grove Area H.S. 

Margaret Bottorf Long '70: M.S. in 
communication, Shippensburg State 
College. She is teaching Spanish in 
Williamsport Maryland H.S. Husband 
Joseph D. Long '73 is a graduate student in 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg. 

Douglas L Marion '70: D.D.S., 
Georgetown University School of Den- 
tistry. He began a postdoctoral degree 
program at Columbia University School of 
Dentistry in September and plans to 
specialize in periodontics. His wife, the 
former Lynn Keim '71 , is teaching 8th and 
9th grade English at George Washington 
Jr. H.S., Ridgewood, N.J. 

Jeffrey A. Mattis '69: Ph.D. in chemis- 
try, Purdue University. Jeff is now en- 
gaged in postdoctoral research in biochem- 
istry at Yale University. 

Melinda C. Mcintosh '72: M.L.S., 
Rutgers University School of Library 
Science. She is reference librarian at the 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

Thomas M . Peischl '65: M.A. in library 
science. University of Denver. He is coor- 
dinator of circulation services, University 
of Northern Colorado, Greeley. Tom and 
his wife, the former Gertrude Walton '66. 
are parents of a son, Jeffrey, born February 
27. 1973. 

Edward J. Pokornicky '62: J.D., Wash- 
ington College of Law, American Univer- 
sity. He served three years with the U.S. 
Medical Service Corps, including 15 
months in Vietnam, and has now estab- 
lished law offices in Maryland. 

Robert H Ray '69: MB. A., Pace 
University, New York City. He has recent- 
ly been promoted to assistant cashier with 
the Franklin National Bank. Bob, his wife 
the former Carol Scherb '70. and daughter 
Jennifer reside at 101 Woodside Ave., 
Midland Park, N.J. 07432. 

Thomas C. Reeves '71: M.Div., New 
Brunswick Theological Seminary. He 
served part-time at Second Reformed 
Church. Irvington. N.J., while studying and 
is now installed as pastor there. 

W. David Rule '69: O.D., Pennsylvania 
College of Optometry. He is engaged in 




Galeman '52 and Green '70 



private practice in Shillington, Pa. 

// Franklin Showers '70: M.Div., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 
He is pastor of Lebanon Lutheran Church, 
Chicago. 

Mary Jane McCrea Spencer '67: M.S. in 
public administration, Shippensburg State 
College. 

William Q. Slickley Jr '70: M. Div., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg. He is pastor of Albany Park 
Lutheran Church, Chicago. 

Virginia E. Slrawn '70: master's degree 
in elementary education, Rutgers Universi- 
ty. She is teaching at the Lafayette Elemen- 
tary School, Highland Park, N.J. 

Scott C. Truver '72: M.A. in political 
science, with major fields of international 
relations and public administration. 
University of Delaware. During the sum- 
mer he held an assistantship with 
Delaware's College of Marine Studies 
where he has now begun a three-year 
program toward the Ph.D. degree and holds 
a research grant/fellowship under Dr. 
Gerard Mangone, director of the Center for 
the Study of Marine Policy. 

Stephen M . Vak '68: M.A. in education, 
Lehigh University. He is pursuing ad- 
ditional graduate study in the field of 
educational administration, and received 
an award from the National Science Foun- 
dation for summer work. Steve is assistant 
superintendent in the Pine Grove (Pa.) area 
school district. His wife, the former Sharon 
Felterolf'6%. has been serving as director of 
St. Matthew's Lutheran Church Day Care 
Center in Schuylkill Haven. 

Craig D Wolters '70: M.A. in guidance 
and counseling. Rider College. He is assis- 
tant director of student activities at Morris 
County College, Dover, N.J. His wife, the 
former Sandra Douglas '72. is a vocal 
music teacher in Manville, N.J. 



FALL 1974 



33 



A Preview of the Roundball Season 



SU Sports 



by PETE SILVESTRI 



ALTHOUGH SUSQUEHANNA'S 1973-74 basketball 
record of 1 3- 1 2 did not measure up to pre-season hopes, third- 
year coach Barry Keadle did achieve the most successful 
Crusader basketball campaign since the 20-4 slate of 1962-63. 
It was Keadle's first winning season at Susquehanna, and 
only the second in 1 1 years for the Crusaders. With only one 
starter gone at graduation and eight lettermen returning, in- 
cluding 6-6 junior forward Dave Long of Doylestown, Pa., 
who Keadle considers an Ail-American candidate, the 
Crusaders are again hoping for a fine season in 1974-75. 

Long made the switch from center to forward early last 
season, and responded by leading the team in scoring and 
rebounding as a sophomore with averages of 17.4 points and 
8.3 rebounds per game. With figures slightly higher than that 
in league competition, Long was selected to the first team of 
the Middle Atlantic Conference Northern College Division 
All-Star squad. Keadle says Long "has speed and quickness 
and is the best shooter (55 percent last year) for a big man that 
I've ever coached." The only characteristic Long is lacking, 
according to Keadle, is sufficient aggressiveness, and he's 
gaining in that department. 

Another outstanding returnee is 6-1 senior Ralph 
Wolckenhauer of River Vale, N.J., a leaper who played at 
both guard and forward last year but will be used primarily in 
the backcourt next season. He was the Crusaders top assist- 
ant man last winter, second leading rebounder with 7.3 per 
game, third high scorer with 11.5 points per game, and ex- 
hibits the kind of hustle and desire that keeps Keadle 
muttering "I wish I had four more like him. "Joining Long in 
the frontcourt will probably be 6-9 sophomore Bob Hertzog 
of Atlas, Pa., at center and 6'3" junior Tom McCarty of 
Roslyn, Pa., at forward. Dave Atkinson of Carbondale, Pa., a 
6-4 forward who saw more action than any other freshman on 
the squad last season, is a dependable reserve and possible 
starter. Sophomore center Bob Buckfelder of Rockville Cen- 
tre, N.Y., who at 6-4 has less height but more strength than 
Hertzog, is also a contender for a starting job, although he did 
not play enough to earn a letter last year. Of this group, 
McCarty and Atkinson made the biggest contributions last 
year. McCarty played in every game but one and had 4.6 
rebounds and 7.1 points per game. Atkinson averaged 4.8 
rebounds and 4.9 points in four less games, is excellent on 
defense. With plenty of size and talent available, Keadle ex- 
pects to be strongest in the front line. An incoming freshman, 
6-7 forward Bruce Bishop of Cranston, N.J., will also be 
given an opportunity to earn some playing time. 

Paired with Wolckenhauer at guard will be 6-0 senior 
Joe Prekopa of McAdoo, Pa., a starter last year who didn't 




6-6 scoring leader Dave Long 



take many shots but earned 49 percent for 8.8 points per 
game. The one starter who graduated is two-time All ECAC 
guard Jim Baglin, who averaged 13.8 points per game last 
winter though bothered by a back injury. His outside 
shooting, ball-handling and playmaking abilities will be hard 
to replace. Should Wolckenhauer and Prekopa fail to pick up 
the slack, a pair of highly regarded 6-0 freshmen, Kreg 
Ultican of Rootstown, Ohio, and Archie Stank of Shamokin, 
Pa., are available to help out at guard. 

Other returning lettermen are Steve Deck, 6-3 junior 
forward from Scotch Plains, N.J., and Mike Timmons, 6'1" 
junior guard from Chatham, N.J. Also back with some ex- 
perience under their belts are DaveSpence, 5-10junior guard 
from Wheaton, Md., and John Neuhauser, 6-3 junior forward 
from Roslyn, Pa. 

If next season follows last year's pattern, it could be a 
fine line that marks the difference between a good record and 
a mediocre one. Last season the Crusaders were involved in 
seven games that were decided by the one or two points, and 
they lost five of them. Susquehanna's main strength should be 
shooting, as it was last year when the team hit 49 percent from 
the floor for the season. The Crusaders should hold their own 
under the boards. Last year ball-handling mistakes proved 
costly, as the opposition got more shots at the basket than did 
the Crusaders, and Susquehanna could have trouble in that 
department again next season. But if the guards can avoid tur- 
novers, the Crusaders could enjoy their best basketball cam- 
paign in 12 years. 



34 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



«; do" 



SMITH-LEINTHALL 

Mary E. Leinthall x'67 to Willard D. 
Smith, August 1970. / 2303 Boulevard 
Ave., Scranton. Pa. 18509. 

PISERCHIA-ZLOCKIE 

Gloria A. Piserchia x'74 to Robert A. 
Zlockie '72. August 26, 1971. Bob is a 
secondary school instructor for Harford 
County, Aberdeen, Md. / 309 Parke St., 
Aberdeen, Md. 21001. 

KL1NGER-ENSINGER 

Bonny Rose Ensinger '72 to John R. 
Klinger, June 17, 1972. Clarks Grove 
United Methodist Church, Paxinos, Pa. 
Bonnie teaches music in Shamokin Area Jr. 
H.S. Mr. Klinger is with Clark Packing Co. 
/ R.D. 1, Box 308, Paxinos, Pa. 17860. 
VON THADEN-SCHMITT 

Nancy Von Thaden x'74 to Barry 
Schmitt, June 9, 1973 / Amberlands 18-0, 
Croton-on-the-Hudson, N.Y. 10520. 
PETRO-RAUGHT 

Bonnie B. Raught to Tommy F Petro 
'72, June 16, 1973. Tommy is a senior ac- 
countant with Cooper & Lybrand, C.P.A., 
Philadelphia. / Apt. 69A Ivy House. Amity 
Gardens, Douglassville, Pa. 19518. 
KELLERMAN-COON 

Kathleen Coon '73 to James E. Keller- 
man '73. November 3, 1973, Reading, Pa. 
Jeffrey Vayda '75. Vicki Melz '74. and 
Dorothy Jones Zimmerman x'74 were in 
the wedding party. Roberta Laudenslager 
'75 was the soloist. Kathy is in paralegal 
work and Jim is with Equitable Life 
Assurance. / 196-04 89th Rd„ Hollis, N.Y. 
11423. 

McKINNELL-HERMAN 

Terri A. Herman x'74 to George 
McKinnel, January 12, 1974. Terri is ma- 
joring in child development at the Universi- 
ty of Delaware and expects to graduate in 
December. / 2 Wilbur St., Newark, Del. 
19711. 

SHEA-DOWL1NG 

Cheryl E. Dowling '66 to Michael Shea, 
February 24, 1974, La Jolla, Calif. Cheryl 
is a stewardess and Mike is a captain, both 
with American Airlines and currently based 
out of San Diego. / 7304 Country Club Dr., 
La Jolla, Calif. 92037. 

BOND-GLOSTER 

Kathleen F Gloster '73 to William E. 
Bond '73. May 4, 1974, Trinity Reformed 
United Church of Christ Church, Jenkin- 
town. Pa. Sharon Gloster '75. Lynn Hoff- 
man '74. Kenneth Bechtold '73. and Chris 
George '73 were in the wedding party. 
Kathleen is a teacher at the Lynch Home 
for profoundly retarded children in Willow- 
Grove and Bill is a research programmer 



FALL 1974 



for Wyeth Laboratories, Radnor. / 340 
Woodlyn Dr., Collegeville, Pa. 19426. 
PAYNE-SALDUKAS 

Linda G. Saldukas '73 to Walter J. 
Payne '73. May 25, 1974, St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church, Gordon, Pa. 5. Jack 
Price '73. Robert Cole '73. Peter Emig '73 
and William Weary '73 were members of 
the wedding party and Terri Benincasa '75 
was the vocalist. Linda is a research chemist 
at Merck. Sharp & Dohme, Rahway. Walt 
teaches 10th grade earth science in West- 
field. / 1909 Church St., Apt. 1-A, 
Rahway. N.J. 07065. 

STIEHL-WRIGHT 

Nancy M. Wright '74 to David A. Sliehl 
'72, First Reformed Church, Pompton 
Plains, N.J. The wedding party included 
Wendy Jones '74. Pamela Gehron '74 and 
William Eriksen '73. / 249 Belleville Ave., 
Apt. 3 1 -A, Bloomfield, N.J. 07003. 
SHADE-PRUGH 

Karen L Prugh '70 to Thomas W. Shade 
Jr. '69, spring 1 974. Karen is with the senior 
adult activities center of Montgomery 
County and Tom is associated with 
Equitable Life Assurance on Long Island. / 
Manhasset Bay Apt. B-l, 94 Shore Rd„ 
Port Washington, N.Y. 11051. 
MAGUIRE-LUBAS 

Frances Lubas to Michael P. Maguire 
x'74. June 1, 1974, Belle Mead, N.J. Mrs. 
Maguire, a graduate of Wilfred Beauty 
Academy, is a beautician at Norweigan 
Beauty Manor. Mike is with Gordon & 
Wilson Co., Hightstown, and plans to 
further his education in the plumbing field. 
/ 12 Moore St., Princeton, N.J. 08540. 
FAIR-WOERNLE 

Sue Ellen Woernle '72 to Paul E. Fair Jr. 
'72. June 1974, First Presbyterian Church, 
Bethlehem, Pa. Carolyn Walker '72 and 
Bruce Henderson '72 were attendants. Sue 
is nursing student at Loyola University, 
Chicago. Paul is serving with the U.S. Ar- 
my. / 816 Forest Wilmette, 111. 60091. 
CUNNINGHAM-ZENG 

Vicki Zeng x'74 to Charles Cunningham. 
June 19, 1974. Vicki received her B.A. in 
political science from Dowling College. 
Barkdale, N.Y. and is now with Fidelity 
National Title Insurance Co. / 2505 Verde 
Dr., Apt. 223, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
80910. 

FLEMING-GLENNEY 

Katherine R Glenney '74 to David G. 
Fleming '73. June 22, 1974, St. Mary's 
Episcopal Church. Manchester, Conn. 
Craig Vrie '73 and James Culpepper '73 
were ushers. David is an accountant for 
Pierce Phelps. Camp Hill, Pa. / 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055. 

KUTTRUFF-HUMMEL 

Kathleen L Hummel '73 to George A. 
Kuttruff, June 22, 1974, St. John's 



Lutheran Church. Northumberland, Pa. 
Coleen Warn Bidelspach '72 was organist, 
Barbara Lane '73. the vocalist, and David 
Hummel '69 was an usher. Kathy is an 
English teacher in Lititz. Mr. Kuttruff, a 
graduate of Lafayette College, is taking 
graduate studies at the University of 
Delaware. / 9 W. Clover Ave., Strasburg, 
Pa. 17579. 

REES-KUMP 

Susan Kump to Robert H. Rees x'74. 
June 22, 1974. Robert earned the B.S. in en- 
vironmental science from Cook College of 
Rutgers University and is a field represen- 
tative for Johns Manville Corp. / 601 W. 
Lake Ave.. Rahway, N.J. 07065. 
PLUDE-STARKEY 

Pamela A. Starkey '74 to Michael T. 
Plude. June 29, 1974, St. Denis Church, 
Hopewell Junction, N.Y. Gail Elser '74. 
Janet Rice '74 and Cynthia Wood '74 
served as attendants. Mr. Plude was 
graduated from Fairfield University and 
teaches in the Wilton schools. / Bethel, 
Conn. 06801. 

BERGEN-GRIFFIN 

Nancy B. Griffin '74 to James L. Bergen 
'73. June 29, 1974, Pilgrim Congregational 
Church, Harwich Port, Mass. Denise Kleis 
'73 and Frederick Linnemeyer '73 were 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1974-75 

Winter Sports Schedules 

VARSITY BASKETBALL 



D4 


Juniata 


H 


D7 


Westminster 


A 


Dll 


Albright 


A 


DI4 


Wilkes 


A 


DI8 


Messiah 


H 


D26- 


Lutheran Brotherhood 




28 


Tournament M 


nneapolis 


J8 


Albright 


H 


Jll 


Lycoming 


H 


JI5 


Lock Haven State 


A 


Jl8 


Wagner 


A 


J2l 


Lebanon Valley 


A 


J22 


Grove City 


H 


J25 


Upsala 


H 


J28 


Philadelphia Textile 


A 


Fl 


Elizabethtown 


A 


F3 


Juniata 


A 


F5 


Wilkes 


H 


F8 


Delaware Valley 


H 


Fl2 


York 


H 


Fl7 


Lycoming 


A 


Fl9 


Scranton 
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


H 


JI4 


Albright 


A 


Jl7 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


J23 


Elizabethtown 


A 


J25 


Juniata 


H 


J29 


Wilkes 


H 


J3l 


Bucknell 


A 


F4 


Bloomsburg State 


H 


Fl3 


Dickinson 


A 



attendants. Jim teaches mathematics in 
Montoursville. / 800 St. Paul St.. Lewis- 
hurg. Pa. 17837. 

C \ROTHERS-PEMBRIDGE 

Cheryl Ann Pembridge to John W. 
Carothers 69. July 6. 1974. Hurlbut 
Memorial Church. Chautauqua. N.Y. A 
graduate of Wheaton College, Mrs. 
Carothers teaches English at Kent Place 
School. Summit. John served four years in 
the U.S. Nav\ and is now with Bankers 
Trust in New York. / 41 Kent Place Blvd.. 
Summit. N.J. 07901. 

VAN COTT-NAYLOR 

Donna A. Naylor to Edwin C. Van Cott 
7 0. July 6. 1974. United Church of Christ, 
Quakertown. Pa. Mrs. Van Cott is a 
graduate of Northampton College of Den- 
tal Hygiene. Ed is an air traffic controller at 
the New York Center for the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration. / 247 Terrace Rd., 
Bayport, N.Y. 11705. 

RUNYAN-MILLER 

Sandra L. Miller x' 72 to James J. Run- 
yan. July 20. 1974. Danville. Pa. Sandra, a 
graduate of George Washington Universi- 
ty, is the property manager of Prosseda 
Enterprises. Milton. Pa. / R.D.4. Danville, 
Pa. 17821. 



* 



WRESTLING 




Lebanon Valley Tournament 


LV 


Juniata 


H 


Messiah 


H 


Albright 


A 


Johns Hopkins & Salisbury 


A 


Bucknell 


H 


Kings 


A 


Muhlenberg 


H 


Lebanon Valley & Moravian 


LV 


elaware Valley & Swarthmore 


DV 


Elizabethtown 


A 


Scranton 


H 


Gettysburg 


H 



MAC 



Scranton 



JV BASKETBALL 




Juniata 


H 


Albright 


A 


Wilkes 


A 


Messiah 


H 


Albright 


H 


Lycoming 


H 


Lock Haven State 


A 


Lebanon Valley 


A 


Penn State Capital Campus 


H 


Intramural All-Stars 


H 


Bucknell 


A 


Elizabethtown 


A 


Juniata 


A 


Wilkes 


H 


Delaware Valley 


H 


York 


H 


Lycoming 


A 


Scranton 


H 




Visitors to the Blough Learning Center are greeted in the 
lobby by this giant philodendron. Monstera deliciosa. 



CASSO-HAINES 

Siisan E Haines '74 to Bruce W. Casso 
'74. July 20. 1974. First Presbyterian 
Church. West Chester, Pa. S.U. par- 
ticipants in the wedding were Barbara 
Dalrvrnple '74. Daniel Baxter '74 and 
Douglas Sutherland '74. Susan is a 
professional employment counselor for 
Swift & Swift Personnel Service. Bruce is in 
the executive training program of John 
Wanamaker. Philadelphia. / 300 W. Miner 
St.. West Chester, Pa. 19380. 
REILLY-DORAN 

Ellen K. Doran '74 to John H. Reilly, 
August 3, 1974 in a nuptial mass. Music 
was provided by Jeanne Kauffman '74. 
flute; Susan Lang '74. French horn, and 
Christine Schmidt '74. vocalist. Chere Wise 
'74 and Susan Zierdt '74 were in the wed- 
ding party. Ellen teaches English in 
Chester, N.J. at West Morris Central H.S. 
and her husband, a graduate of Fairfield 
University, is with Delpark, Inc., Manas- 
quan. / 48 Court St., Apt. B-3. Morris- 
town. N.J. 07960. 

CAIN-HERDLE 

Anne L. Herdle '73 to Paul A. Cain '72. 
August 24. 1974. Summerville Presbyter- 
ian Church. Rochester. N.Y. Lianne 
McCartney '74 was soloist and Jim 
Spriggle '72 was an usher. Paul is pursuing 
graduate study in chemistry at the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh. / 6539 Northumberland 
St.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 15217. 

TRUVER-DUNNE 

Peggy Dunne to Scott C. Truver '72. 
August 24. 1974. Wilmington. Del. Mrs. 
Truver is a graduate of the University of 
Delaware and is a Japanese linguistic 
specialist for the National Security Agen- 
cy. / Apt. D. 202 Timber Tr., Hickory- 
Hills. Bel Air. Md. 21014. 



Born Crusaders 



To Peter M. and Judith Strichler Goda 
'65. their third son, Jonathan David. Oc- 
tober 26. 1972. His two brothers are Peter 
Michael and Mark Andrew. Mr. Goda is 
the national field consultant for Singer 
Corp. in research and development. / R.D. 
I. Box 170. Mohrsville, Pa. 19541. 

To John P. and Sherry Inch Hunt '71 . a 
son, Eric Jefferson. July 27. 1973. / 439 N. 
Second St.. Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 

To James T. '62 and Linda Wassam 
Coolbaugh '63. their third child, a son. Kirk 
Brian. October 9, 1973. Kirk has a sister 
Lisa Lynn and a brother Craig Alan. Jim is 
financial plans adviser for Eastern Penn- 
sylvania with Nationwide Insurance Com- 
panies. / 235 Indian Creek, Dr., 
Mechanicsburg. Pa. 17055. 

To Park H. '57 and Denece \ewhard 
Haussler '59. their fourth child, a daughter. 
Peme Aleen. November I, 1973. Park is 
financial manager at St. Marys Hospital of 
Rochester. Minn. / 3536 Ogden Court 
N.E.. Rochester. Minn. 55901. 

To Bernard L. and Ruth Seigfried 
Himmelberger '6H. their first child, a son. 
Brent Eric. January 30. 1974. / Box 66, 
Strausstown. Pa. 19559. 

To Dr. W. David '69 and Linda Taylor 
Rule '69. their first child, a son. Kenneth 
John. May 14. 1974. / 105 K Colonial Dr.. 
Shillington. Pa. 19607. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William J. Seaton. 
their second son. David, through adoption. 
David, two years old. arrived at Kennedy 
Airport April 17. 1974. His brother Jamie 
is four. Mr. Seaton is an instructor in 
sociology at S.U. and Mrs. Seaton teaches 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



at Kinderfold. a nursery school in Christ 
Lutheran Church, Lewisburg. / 123 N. 
Front St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Christopher J. Gipe 
'66. their first child, a daughter Kristen 
Nicole. July 2, 1974. Chris is a psychologist 
at Hollidaysburg State Hospital. / 21 
Sylvan Dr., Hollidaysburg, Pa. 16648. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Dennis H Sheariss '70, 
their first child, a son, Scott Clark. July 13, 
1974. Dennis is a stockbroker with Edwards 
and Hanly. / 5703 Coachmen East Apts., 
Lindenwold, N.J. 08021. 

To Ronald J. and Leanne Shaw Belletti 
'66. their second son, Greg Michael. July 
22, 1974. / Spruce Hills, R.D. 1, Lewis- 
burg, Pa. 17837. 

To Donald J. and Ann Detterline Busch 
'65. their second child, Donald Martin, July 
27, 1974. / 5057 North 8th St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 19120. 

To Mr. & Mrs. Randall W. Bailey '74. 
their second child, a son, Jason William. 
August 6, 1974. Randy is with the Internal 
Auditing Department of Kinney Shoes. / 
Summerdale, Pa. 17093. 



deaths 



Rav S. Bolig '05. Millersburg, Pa. 

Dr. Emerson L Derr '39. Selinsgrove, 
Pa., July 10, 1974. He earned the M.A. 
from Bucknell and Ed.D. from Penn State 
University, both in history. Dr. Derr retired 
in 1970 after 45 years of teaching mostly at 
Shikellamy Sr. H.S., Sunbury. He also 
taught part-time at Susquehanna for a 
time. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran 
Church. Hughesville, and several profes- 
sional organizations. Among his survivors 
is a daughter, Jean Derr Powell '49 (Mrs. 
Clifford M.). 

Maude Kempfer Thomas x ( M rs. H urley 
R), Beaver Springs. Pa., July 12, 1974. 
Prior to her retirement in 1965 she was a 
member of the staff at the Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital. She was a member of 
Christ United Church of Christ. 

Mary Da Boll Mease, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
July 14, 1974, a former University library 
and registrar's office employee, she was the 
wife of William L Mease '40. She was a 



member of St. Paul's United Church of 
Christ. 

Cordilla Mover Mover x 17 . Selins- 
grove, Pa., July 15, 1974. She was the 
widow of Perry F. Moyer '16. She was a 
member of Sharon Lutheran Church and 
the Rev. Ceto V. Leit:el '45 officiated at her 
funeral service. Among her survivors is a 
sister, Marion Moyer Polteiger '17. widow 
of Dr. Robert J. Polteiger x'IS. 

Clyde D. Sechler '41. Cranbury, N.J., 
July 21. 1974. A onetime Selinsgrove music 
teacher, Clyde and his wife, the former 
Louise Mc Williams '43, were identified 
with the Fred Waring organization for 
many years. They both sang with the 
famous Pennsylvanians and Clyde was the 
group's composer-arranger. He also 
appeared frequently on the Ed Sullivan TV 
show and was well known as the creator of a 
number of successful commercials. In 1966, 
on the occasion of his 25th anniversary reu- 
nion, the talented family (Clyde, Louise 
and their two children, Jody and Craig) 
presented two performances of a rollicking 
variety show at Susquehanna. He was a 
Presbyterian elder and choir director. 




Nostalgia 7 This photo appears to have been taken about 
65 years ago. perhaps at the dedication of the sundial built 
in front of Seibert Hall The attractive landmark no 
longer exists and the empty platform was removed in 1959. 



President Charles T Aikens is the bowler-halted gentleman 
to the right. The building across from Selinsgrove 
Hall is the old gymnasium, completed in 1903 and destroyed 
by fire in 1934. Note the pump over Prexy's left shoulder. 



FALL 1974 



37 



Susquehanna University Rlumni association 

Directory of Officers 1974-75 



George H. Bantley '41. 4998 Longvlew Dr.. Murrysville, Pa 15668 President 

William C- Davenport '53. 420 Deerlleld Rd.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 

Robert L Hackenberg '56. 2019 Hilltop Rd., Westfleld, N.J. 07090 Vice President 

Signe S. Gates '71. 12000 Old Georgetown Rd.. Apt. C-1407. Rockville. Md 20852 

Recording Secretary 
Chester G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St.. Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Douglas E. Arthur '49. 4696 N Galen Rd . Harrlsburg, Pa. 17110 

Representative on University Board of Directors 
Henry J. Keil '39. 581 Nordhoff Dr.. Leonia, N.J. 07065 

Representative on University Board ol Directors 
Edward S. Rogers. Jr. '42. 1629 S Crescent Blvd.. Yardley, Pa 19067 

Representative on University Board ol Directors 
Samuel D Ross '54. R.D. 8, Carlisle, Pa. 17013 

Representative on University Board of Directors 
Simon B Rhoads '30. 300 Susquehanna Ave.. Selinsgrove. Pa 17870 

Representative to Athletic Committee 
Louis E Santangelo Jr. '50, 111 Cocoa Ave.. Hershey. Pa. 17033 

Representative to Athletic Committee 

Executive Board members-at- large, term expiring 1975 

Xavier Abbott '35. 215 Oliver St.. Swoyerville. Pa. 18704 

Jane Southwick Mathias '49 (Mrs Roy P.), West Lawn. Fairmount Dr . Lewlsburg, Pa 17837 

Peter M Nunn '57. 8715 Liberty Lane, Potomac, Md. 20854 

Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68 (Mrs Stephen M .). Skyline Apts . Apt 102, Cressona. Pa 17929 

S John Price '42. 1435 Arch St, Ashland, Pa. 17921 



Executive Board members- at- large term expiring 1976 
Samuel D Clapper '68, 145 Plank Rd.. Apt. 32. Somerset. Pa 15501 
Alan C. Lovell '70, 2312 Chetwood Cir . Apt. 304, Timonium. Md 21093 
James Gormley '55. 8615 Alicia St., Philadelphia. Pa. 19115 
Lester C Heilman Jr. '52. 244 Green Lane Dr.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Franklin G Smith '55. 1838 N 21st St. Allentown, Pa 18104 



Executive Board membere-at-large term expiring 1977 

Maria Wemikowski MacFarlan '62 (Mrs Robert M ). 454 Cherry La.. Ridgewood. N.J 07450 

Elwood M McAllister '49. R.O. 1, Box 262. Parkland Terr . Allentown. Pa 18102 

Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69 (Mrs. William G.J, 1705 Hampshire Green La.. Silver Spring. Md. 

20903 
Neil R Smith '63, Box 147. Warriors Mark, Pa. 16877 
James W White '58. 413 N. George St.. Millersville, Pa. 17551 

District Club Organizations 

ALTOONA 

Mary Emma Yoder Jones '41 (Mrs Marshall S), R.D. 2. Box 297. Altoona, Pa 16601 

President 
Christopher J Gipe '66, 21 Sylvan Dr.. Hollidaysburg. Pa. 16648 Secretary-Treasurer 



LEHIGH VALLEY 
The Rev Gilbert C. Askew '61, 1936 Pennsylvania St.. Allentown, Pa 18104 President 

Dr George A Kirchner 64. 469 Manor Dr.. Allentown, Pa 18103 Vice President 

Mary Moore Schatkowskl '58 (Mrs Edwin). 3044 Hecktown Rd.. Bethlehem, Pa 18017 

Secretary-Treasurer 

LEWISTOWN 

Harry B Thatcher. Esq. '41, South Hills. Lewistown. Pa 17044 President 

Sherman E Good '30. Railroad St, McClure, Pa. 17841 Vice President 

Ruth Goff Nicodemus '30 (Mrs. Bryce E.), 471 S Main St, Lewistown, Pa Secretary-Treasurer 



MOUNT C ARMEL-SHAMOKIN 
Timothy E. Barnes '35. 251 N. Park St.. Mount Carmel. Pa 17B51 
Dr James C Gehris '50, 633 W Chestnut St, Shamokln. Pa 17872 
S John Price '42. 1435 Arch St, Ashland, Pa. 17921 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51 (Mrs William M). Trailwood. R.D 1. Wllkes-Barre. Pa 18702 

President 
Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St.. Swoyersville. Pa 18704 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36. Rear 68 Division St.. Kingston, Pa 18704 Secretary-Treasurer 

NORTH NEW JERSEY 

Harold N Johnson "54. 80 Old Sterling Rd-. Warren Twp . N.J 07060 Chairman 

Robert L Hackenberg '56. 2019 Hilltop Rd., Westfleld, N.J 07090 Vice Chairman 

PHILADELPHIA 

Kenneth R Fish '63, 306 Ivy Rock La.. Havertown. Pa. 19083 President 

James J Gormley '55. 8615 Alicia St., Philadelphia. Pa 19115 Vice President 

Marvel Cowling Robinson '53 (Mrs Franklin E). 309 Woodridge La . Media. Pa 19063 

Corresponding Secretary 
Shirley A. Young '51, Fountainville. Pa. 18923 Recording Secretary 

Louise E West '39, Seven Oaks East. Apt. 627, 302 E. Marshall St, West Chester. Pa 19380 

Treasurer 
Donald F. Wohlsen 50. Kenilworth La.. Ambler. Pa. 19002 Director 

James B Norton III '64. Box 7. Mt Airy Rd., Coatesville. Pa 19320 Director 

PITTSBURGH 

Thomas G P. Roberts '68. 1735 Fairmont Ave., New Kensington. Pa 15068 Chairman 

READING 

W. Frank Laudenslayer '39. 215 N. 6th St.. Box 311. Reading. Pa 19603 President 

Dr Ralph H Tietbohl Jr '49. 3051 Van Reed Rd . Sinking Spring. Pa 19608 Vice President 

William S Whiteley '35, 1910 N 15th St.. Reading, Pa. 19604 Secretary 

Richard Cahn '58. 464 Hill Rd . Wernersville, Pa 19565 Treasurer 



BALTIMORE 



To be elected 



CALIFORNIA 

Dr Robert N Troutman '26. 434 w 12th St.. Claremont. Calif. 91711 President 

CENTRE-UNION 

W Alfred Streamer '26. 422 Kemmerer Rd., State College. Pa 16801 President 

Lois Dauberman Schultz '48 (Mrs. Wm C). 956 Tanney St.. Bellefonte. Pa. 16823 

Vice President 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 

Carolyn L. Tritt '68. 1813 Alexander Ave.. Chambersburg. Pa. 17201 President 

Paul Lucas '38. 1855 Scotland Ave.. Chambersburg. Pa. 17201 Vice President 

Susan Zeichner Hopple '66 (Mrs. Herman K), Route 8. Chambersburg, Pa 17201 Secretary 



SOUTH JERSEY 

Joseph R. Joyce '63. 30 Harrow Gate. Cherry Hill. N.J 08003 President 

Thomas D. Samuel Jr '63. 125 Bartram Rd., Marlton, N.J 08053 Vice President 

Peggy Thoman Luscko '63 (Mrs. John F.). 136 N Lakeside Dr E, Medtord. N.J 08055 

Secretary 

David J Schumacher '64. 3103 Sheffield Dr.. Cinnaminson. N.J. 08077 Treasurer 

Charlotte Sandt Erdley '56 (Mrs Kenneth F Jr.), 302 Lenape Tr . Wenonah, N.J 08090 Director 

Douglas E Spotts '63. 1305 Columbia Ave., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 Director 

John F. Luscko '63. 136 N Lakeside Dr E. Medford. N.J. 08055 Director 

SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 

Arthur F Bowen '65, 217 E. Walnut St . Selinsgrove, Pa 17870 President 

Barbara Brown Troutman '67 (Mrs David R). 410 N. 9th St, Selinsgrove, Pa 17870 

Vice President 
Joseph W Kleinbauer '63, R.D 1. Monroe Manor. Selinsgrove, Pa 17870 Secretary 

James C Black '63. RD 1, Box 494, Fairway Dr . Selinsgrove. Pa 17870 Treasurer 



HARRISBURG 

William C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 President 

Jack K. Bishop '54. 415 Lexington Ct., Stafford Heights. Hershey. Pa. 17033 Vice President 

James R Clark. '46. 424 Parkside Rd.. Camp Hilt. Pa. 17011 Vice President 

Carol Ocker Kirk '65 (Mrs Peter D ), 1511 Chatham Dr.. Camp Hill. Pa. 17011 Secretary 

Catherine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs. Clayton K). 571 Walnut Rd., Steelton. Pa. 17113 

Treasurer 

JOHNSTOWN 

To be elected President 

John A. Topper '65, P.O Box 554. Hyndman, Pa. 15545 Vice President 

Mary Lizzlo Govekar '47 (Mrs Max A.). P.O. Box 14, Elton. Pa 15934 Secretary 

Thomas J Weible '23, 324 Orchard St.. Johnstown, Pa. 15905 Treasurer 



WASHINGTON 

Louis R Coons '61. 10300 Darby St, Fairfax, Va 22030 

R Brent Swope 65, 11711 Castlewood Ct, Potomac, Md 20854 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



WILLIAMSPORT 

Donald S King '66. 604 Montour St., Montoursville. Pa. 17754 President 

Ruth Wheeland Wentz '38 (Mrs Fillmore H). 1517 Warren Ave . Wllliamsport. Pa 17701 

Secretary-Treasurer 

YORK-HANOVER 

Jerry E Egger '65, R.D. 4. Box 107, Dover. Pa. 17315 President 

Jean Rowe Lauver '54 (Mrs Orville H). 2040 E Market St, York. Pa 17402 Secretary 



LANCASTER 

Richard E. '55 and Suzanne Seal McCarty x'57, 1810 Edenwald La.. Lancaster. Pa. 17601 

Chairman 



WESTCHESTER COUNTY-SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT 

Janet Leitzel Falrchlld '32 (Mrs Lee M ), Old Croton Lake Rd , Box 429. Mt Kisco. N Y 10549 

President 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



(FOR MEMBERS & THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILIES) 
PRESENTS 



HAWAII 

DELUXE 

JANUARY 25 - 
FEBRUARY 1,1975 ^g> 

Saturday - Saturday 




PHILADELPHIA DEPARTURE ! 




$ 



449 



( + 15% Tax & Service) 

Per person-Double occupancy 

Single Supplement - $80.00 




DINE-AROUND RESTAURANTS 



* Price subject to change; date subject to confirmation. 



YOUR TRIP INCLUDES: 

Round trip jet transportation to Honolulu 
(Meals and beverages served aloft)! 

Traditional Hawaiian Flower Lei Greeting 
on arrival ! 

Deluxe accommodations at the beautiful 
ILIKAI HOTEL (or similar)! 
[Room tax included] 

Dinner six evenings - Dine-Around Plan - Hon- 
olulu's finest restaurants (tax included) 
[One evening on your own] 

Sightseeing tour of Honolulu and Mount 
Tantalus by deluxe motorcoach ! 

Exciting low-cost optional tours available ! 

All gratuities for bellboys and doormen ! 

All round trip transfers and luggage handling 
from airport to the hotel ! 

Experienced escort and Hotel Hospitality 
Desk ! 

■ Air transportation ■ 345 seat Overseas National Airways, U.S. 
Certificated Supplemental Air Carrier, DC-10 Jet; Estimated 
Cost - $270.00 ; Land - $246.35; Charter Cost - $93,150 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Deposits are accepted on a First-Come. First-Served basis as space is limited! Final payment 
is due 60 days prior to departure New bookings are accepted any time prior to departure provid- 
ing space is available Reservations may not be considered confirmed until deposits are accepted 
by Arthurs Travel Center Information will be sent to you four to six weeks after your deposit is 
received Cancellation without penalty will be permitted if written request is received 60 days be- 
fore departure Cancellation after 60 days will be subject to an administrative charge of $25 00 
per person and there will also be a charge for the pro rata air fare unless replacement is made 
from a waiting list; however, the availability of such replacement is not guaranteed An Air Fare 
Refunder Policy is available and an application will be sent to you 4 to 6 weeks after your deposit 
is received Refunds resulting from cancellations may take 8 to 10 weeks to process ■ Applicable 
government regulations require that air/land costs are quoted and that the air cost is subject 
to revision based on the actual number of participants, however, only the complete air/land pack- 
aged) described in tins brochure is available Price subject to change for currency fluctuation, 
any taxes imposed since the price of this trip has been set and applicable government regula- 
tions Trips are based on a minimum of 40 participants. 



RESPONSIBILITY ARTHURS TRAVEL CENTER. INC " and'or its associated agents act as agent 
only for all services furnished herein and expressly disclaim all responsibility or liability of any 
nature whatsoever for loss, damage or injury to property or to person due to any cause whatsoever 
occurring during the tour or tours described herein and for loss of trip time resulting from airline 
delays All tickets, coupons and orders are issued subiect to the foregoing and to any and all 
terms and conditions under which the means of transportation and/or other services provided 
thereby are offered and/or supplied by the owners, contractors or public carriers for whom ARTHURS 
TRAVEL CENTER acts solely as agent ARTHURS TRAVEL CENTER reserves the right in its discre- 
tion to change any part of the itinerary or the air carrier or the aircraft utilized without notice 
and lor any reason 

Due to the fuel situation the airlines anticipate the possibility of price increases for fuel There- 
fore, the trip price is subiect to increase based on any surcharge levied by the airlines resulting 
from increased fuel costs 

* and Susquehanna University Alumni Assoc. 



For further information, contact and mail deposits to: Buss Carr, Director of Alumni Relations, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
PHONE: (717) 374-2345 



VOTE: To ensure that you are enrolled on the trip of your choice, make certain that you use this coupon ! ! ! 

RESERVATION COUPON 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: HAWAII: Jan. 25-Feb. 1, 1975 

Enclosed find deposit in the amount of $ ( $ 100.00 per person) for person(s). 

Please enroll us(me). 



NAMEIS) 
CITY 



ADDRESS 



STATE 



ZIP 



BUSINESS PHONE 



HOME PHONE 



ROOMING WITH 



Please check if Single Supplement is desired. ( ) 
Indicate airplane seating preferred (Not guaranteed) 



Please make checks payable to: Susquehanna University Alumni Assoc. 
D Smoking D Non-Smoking 



I MPORTANT: Your reservation cannot be accepted unless the following information is completed: 
MEMBER'S NAME 



DATE JOINED ORGANIZATION : MONTH YEAR 

FOR NON-MEMBERS ENROLLING ON TRIP(S): 

NAME RELATIONSHIP TO MEMBER: ( I SPOUSE 

NAME 



CHILD ( ) PARENT 
RELATIONSHIPTO MEMBER: ( ) SPOUSE ( ) CHILD ( ) PARENT 



ATTENTION PARENTS 

If this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address at your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




263277 49 

MKS MAR(iAKFr EKNST 
H I) 1 
St.LINSGKUVL" PA 



12 



H65 



17870 



POSTMASTER: Please notify if undellverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove. Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



lummiB mquenanna mumnus 




WSSi 



s snummy 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
STANDING COMMITTEES 1974-75 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY FUND 

Douglas E. Arthur '49, Chairman, 4696 N. Galen Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17H0 
Henry J. Keil '39 Harry W. Butts '48 

Charles E. Chaffee '27 Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23 

Raymond P. Garman '30 Ralph C. Geigle '35 

James J. Gormley '55 Elwood M. McAllister '49 

Albert P. Molinaro '50 Edward S. Rogers '42 

Erie I. Shobert '35 Homer W. Wieder Jr. 

ALUMNI WEEKEND 

Robert L. Hackenberg '56, Chairman, 2019 Hilltop Rd., Westfield, NJ. 07090 
Xavier Abbott '35 Signe S. Gates '71 

Simon B. Rhoads '30 M. Jane Schnure '47 

Jack P. Snipe '40 

Reunion Chairmen 

1965: Arthur F. Bowen, 217 E. Walnut St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

1960: Allen I. Rowe, 60 Pine Knoll Dr., Trenton, N.J. 08638 

1955: Walter C. Albert, 46 Township Line, Apt. 309, Elkins Park, Pa. 19117 

1950: Louis E. Santangelo, 1 1 1 Cocoa Ave., Hershey, Pa. 17033 

Donald E. Wissinger, 3 Oak St., Sylvan Hills, Hollidaysburg, Pa. 16648 
1945: Frances Bittinger Burgess, R.D. 3, Box 66. Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
1940: Robert F. Fisher, 26 Gramercy Park, Rochester, N.Y. 14610 
1935: John F. Hanna, 116 W. Mitchell Ave., State College, Pa. 16801 
1930: Marjorie Phillips Mitchell. 102 N. Broad St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
1925: W. Earl Thomas, 237 Chestnut St., Mifflinburg, Pa. 17844 

AWARDS 

Donald E. Wissinger '50, Chairman, 3 Oak St., Sylvan Hills, Hollidaysburg, Pa. 16648 
Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan '62 Jane Southwick Mathias '49 

Peter M. Nunn '57 Chester G. Rowe '52 

Neil R. Smith '63 James W. White '58 

NOMINATIONS 

S. John Price '42, Chairman, 1435 Arch St., Ashland, Pa. 17921 

Linda Nansteel Lovell '71 Frank G. Smith '55 

Sharon Fetterolf Vak '68 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

William C. Davenport '53, Chairman, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Alan C. Lovell '70, Vice Chairman, 2312 Chetwood Cir., Apt. 304, Timonium, Md. 21093 
Samuel D. Ross '54 Dorothy M. Anderson '63 

Samuel D. Clapper '68 Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69 

Dennis L. Eckman '73 Barbara P. Dalrymple '74 

Robert C. Kessler '74 Gwen L. Barclay '75 

John D. Granger '75 Billye Jean Miller '75 

Carol A. Powers '75 Russell J. Laggner '76 

Edward K. McCormick Peter B. Silvestri 

CLUB ACTIVITIES 

Lester C. Heilman '52, Chairman, 244 Green Lane Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

Mary Emma Yoder Jones '41, Altoona Harold N. Johnson '54, North Jersey 

Alan C. Lovell '70, Baltimore Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51, Northeastern Pennsylvania 

Robert N. Troutman '26, California Kenneth R. Fish '63, Philadelphia 

W. Alfred Streamer '26, Centre-Union Thomas G. P. Roberts '68, Pittsburgh 

William C. Davenport '53, Harrisburg Joseph R. Joyce '63, South Jersey 

Richard E. McCarty '55, Lancaster Arthur F. Bowen '65, Susquehanna Valley 

George A. Kirchner '64, Lehigh Valley Louis R. Coons '61, Washington, DC. 

Harry B. Thatcher '41, Lewistown Donald S. King '66, Williamsporl 

Timothy E. Barnes '35, Ml. Carmel-Shamokin Jerry E. Egger '65, York-Hanover 



ON OUR COVER: Susquehanna coed Janice 
Kimmerer helps a Selinsgrove Middle School 
student with his lessons in a new volunteer 
program. The SU students, prior to their stu- 
dent teaching next year, serve as aides to 
regular teachers in the local school — to the ap- 
parent satisfaction of students, teachers, and 
school administrators as well. Our picture 
story is on pages 6 and 7. 

And there is news about the naming of Sus- 
quehanna's Chapel Auditorium, another arti- 
cle by Ted Hutchison '34, a report from the 
Class of 1974, all about the current inter- 
collegiate athletic seasons, and your genial SU 
weatherman, too. So read what's happening on 
campus, and read about your old friends — and 
check that item about Jobs For Alumni, page 
26, too. 

—EDITOR 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



Beorge H. Banttey '41, president; William C. Davenport 
53, Robert Hackenberg '56. vice presidents; Signe S. 
Sates 71, secretary; Chester G. Rowe '52, treasurer; 
)ouglas E, Arthur '49, Henry J. Kell '39. Edward S. Rogers 
Ir. '42, Samuel D. Ross Jr. '54, representatives on the 
Jniversity Board of Directors; Simon B. Rhoads '30, Louis 
: . Santangelo '50. representatives on the University Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Committee. 






xecutive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1975; 
(avier Abbott '35. Jane Southwick Mathlas '49. Peter M. 
•Junn '57, Sharon Fetteroll Vak '68. S. John Price '42. Term 
ixpiring 1976; Samuel D. Clapper '68. Alan C. Lovell '70, 
lames Gormley '55. Lester C. Heilman '52, Franklin G. 
Smith '55. Term expiring 1977; Maria Wernlkowski 
dacFarlan '62. Elwood M McAllister '49, Virginia Carlson 

McKenzie '69. Neil R. Smith '63, James W. White '58. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 44 



WINTER 1975 



No. 2 



CONTENTS 

Alumni Association Committees . . . inside front cover 

The Weber Chapel Auditorium 4 

Volunteers Prep For Teaching 6 

The Class of 1974 Reports 8 

The Weather From Susquehanna 12 

Toward Permanence in Higher Education 14 

by D. Edgar Hutchison '34 

Susquehannans On Parade 17 

"I Do" 20 

Born Crusaders 23 

Spring Sports Schedules 23 

Deaths 25 

Jobs For Alumni 26 

A Letter From Taiwan 27 

Crusader Scoreboard 28 

SU Sports 29 

by Pete Silvestri 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24. 1912. Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



WINTER 1975 







The Weber 

Chapel 

Auditorium 




Above, Joseph Lincoln Ray with a surprised 

Dr Weber following the announcement; Mrs. Weber 

and the President receive congratulations. 

Other photos, left to right and top to bottom. 

show some of the Alumni Association committee 

members at work: University Relations 12). 

Awards 12). Susquehanna University Fund. A A President 

George Bantley '41. Alumni Weekend. Club Activities. 



?jf% 



PRESIDENT and Mrs. Gustave W. Weber didn't 
know what was in store for them when they sat down to 
luncheon with about 65 Alumni Workshop participants 
in the Campus Center on January 18. But Joseph Lin- 
coln Ray of the Board of Directors changed that when 
he announced that the Board had voted to name the 
Center's private dining rooms in honor of Winifred 
Shearer Weber, the President's wife, and to name the 
Chapel Auditorium for Gustave Weber himself. Both 
honors are in recognition and appreciation for 16 years 
(on February 1) of dedicated and fruitful leadership 
from the popular couple. Bronze plaques are to be 
placed in May. 

Weber Chapel Auditorium, with its 1 500 seats and 
unusual multipurpose revolving stage, was completed 
and dedicated on November 6, 1966 by the late Dr. 
Franklin Clark Fry, president of the Lutheran Church 
in America, and actor-composer Efrem Zimbalist Jr. 
An area landmark, it is regularly Filled to capacity for a 
variety of religious and cultural events. 





Volunteers 

Prep 

For Teaching 



A NEW VOLUNTEER internship program at Sus- 
quehanna University allows prospective teachers to 
spend several hours per week during their junior year 
serving as para-professionals with teachers in the new 
Selinsgrove Area Middle School. The internship 
program is intended as preparatory to the education 
majors' 10 weeks of full-time student teaching, re- 
quired for certification, which is done during the senior 
year. 

Dr. Charles J. Igoe, associate professor of educa- 
tion and coordinator of volunteer services at Sus- 
quehanna, is director of the internship program, 
assisted this year by Susan Grubb, a senior English 
major from Selinsgrove, who serves as coordinator of 
the interns. 

The student interns benefit in two major ways 
from their work in the middle school, according to Dr. 
Igoe and Miss Grubb. The experience and skills gained 
will give them an extra "selling point" when they 
graduate and seek a job in an ever-tightening job 
market, and the experience can help the undecided 
determine whether or not they wish to enter the 
teaching profession. The middle school staff also 
benefits. Principal Donald Morgan says he is "ex- 
tremely pleased" with the way the program is working 
out. The teachers "have spoken most favorably" about 
their student assistants, Morgan says. The middle 
school, in fact, could make use of more interns than the 
University has been able to provide. 

The interns perform a variety of functions. They 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




serve as "resource persons," helping teachers find in- 
formation for lessons and plan activities; work tutoring 
individual students who need help in a particular sub- 
ject area; and assist with various projects such as 
cataloging and filing teaching materials. The in- 
novative, open classroom and team-teaching approach 
of the middle school also provides an interesting and 
valuable experience for the University students. 

The physical layout of the $4.8 million building 
opened in September is unusual. The three grades, 6, 7 
and 8, are each housed in what the middle school staff 
calls a "pod," as in "peas in a pod." Each pod is a large, 
open area containing about 200 students who are 
divided into several smaller class sections arranged in 
separate areas, but not set off by walls. The sensation of 
being in a large area with so many students is distrac- 
ting to the visitor, but the school staff maintains that 
teachers and students get used to the arrangement and 
"tune out" the noise and sight of other class groups. A 
main advantage of the arrangement, according to the 
middle school staff, is "flexibility." The physical space 
can be put to a variety of uses without walls getting in 
the way. 

There are some "private" classrooms available for 
purposes such as watching a film, but even these are not 
totally enclosed with openings instead of doors. The 
lack of doors even extends to the student bathrooms. A 
maze effect provides visual privacy, but makes super- 
vision easier by allowing "noise and smoke" to carry 
outside. 




Performing a variety of duties at the Selinsgrove 
Middle School are, clockwise. Eleanor Kusche '75 of 
Northport, N.Y., Kathleen Kilgallen '76 of 
Westwood. N.J.. Brenda Zboray '76 of Northumberland, 
Pa.. Diana Smuda '76 of West Orange. N.J.. and 
Janice Kimmerer '75 of Berkeley Heights. N.J. 



WINTER 1975 




The Class of 1974 Reports 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS is pleased to present this annual report from the most 
recent graduating class— the Class of 1974, 312 strong. Up to preparation time, 
replies to the Alumni Office query totaled 211, which is only slightly more than two- 
thirds, but about the same as the percentage over the past few years. The 
breakdown of residences and occupations does not vary greatly either. The majority 
live in the Middle Atlantic States— 118 in Pennsylvania, 27 in New Jersey, and 18 in 
New York— with 18 other states and three foreign countries also represented. As for 
their occupations: 77 are in business, banking or insurance; 43 are doing graduate 
work; 35 are teaching; 18 are in accounting; 12 are in service occupations; at least 7 
are in computer programming and related work; 5 are in government service; 4 in 
the armed services. Interestingly, 3 are radio announcers and only 2 appear to be 
full-time homemakers. Here they are, the Class of 1974 . . . 



Maria Esther Asin: Graduate study at 
Bucknell, head resident of Casa Espahola 
and lecturer in Spanish at Susquehanna. 

William D. Atkinson: Branch manage- 
ment trainee, Girard Bank, Philadelphia. 

Edwin V. Babbitt 111: Announcer and 
member of the news staff, WVLC, Orleans, 
Mass. 

Jane L. Bailey: Secretary, Fort Augusta 
Construction Co., Sunbury. 

Randall W. Bailey: Accountant, internal 
auditing department of Kinney Shoes, 
Camp Hill, Pa. 

Janet Bauer Upperco: Administrative 
associate, accounting department, 
Princeton University Plasma Physics 
Laboratory, Princeton, N.J. 

Daniel M. Baxter: Sales, Ahmed 
Volkswagen, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Barbara Ann Benion: Teaching 7th and 
8th grade English, Warrior Run Middle 
School, Turbotville, Pa. 

Jill E. Berninger: Graduate study in wild 



life biology at North Carolina State 
University. 

Charles J. Blauvell 111: Music teacher, 
Columbia, Pa. 

Jane Bogenrief Campbell: Temporarily a 
lifeguard and swim coach. 

Winifred L. Bookoul: 8th grade social 
studies teacher, Baltimore County, Tow- 
son, Md. 

Raymond F. Bower: Data Systems 
Department, Southern New England 
Telephone, New Haven, Conn. 

Martha E. Brandwene: File clerk and 
bookkeeper, Alan C. Sugarman Esq., 
Asbury Park, N.J. 

Petite M. K. Brogan: Management 
trainee. East Bay Telephone Employees 
Federal Credit Union, Oakland, Calif. 

Karen E. Brosius: Reference assistant, 
handling interlibrary loans, Blough Learn- 
ing Center at Susquehanna. 

Margaret Brown Mursch: Graduate 
work, Marywood College. 



Stephen K. Brubaker: Vice president. 
Sycamore Hill Trailer Sales, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lorrie Ann Bruckhart: Research assis- 
tant in applied management sciences. Silver 
Spring, Md. 

2/Lt. Lonnie E. Campbell: The Basic 
School, U.S. Marine Corps. Quantico, Va. 

Michael D. Carlini: Staff accountant. 
Price Waterhouse, Philadelphia. 

Bruce W. Casso: Executive training 
program, John Wanamaker, Philadelphia. 

David L. Chester: Graduate study in 
finance and economics. University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Lyle D. Chubb: Teacher of deaf and 
blind, Selinsgrove State School and 
Hospital. 

Thomas G. Clark: Business analyst. Dun 
& Bradstreet, Harrisburg. 

Alan M. Cohn: Graduate study in ac- 
counting, Rutgers University. 

Barry L. Colescott: Sales manager, 
Colescott Real Estate, Sunbury. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Barbara P. Dalrymple: Personnel 
training supervisor, Liberty Mutual In- 
surance Co., Williamsport, Pa. 

Debra Davis Duncan: Group un- 
derwriter, Mutual Benefit Life Insurance 
Co. 

Charles L. DeBrunner III: Graduate 
study in public administration, Penn State 
University. 

Linda L. Degrassi: Graduate study in 
applied oboe. University of Miami. 

Linda M. Deiberl: Management trainee. 
Apparel Affiliates Inc., Quakertown, Pa. 

Debbie C. Dempsey: Lawyers' Assistant 
Program, Mercer University. 

Wayne H. Dietlerick: Teaching vocal 
music, grades 9-12, Governor Livingston 
H.S., Berkley Heights, N.J. 

Richard W. DiSanti: National College of 
Chiropractic, Lombard, 111. 

Ellen Doran Reilly: 9th and 10th grade 
English teacher. West Morris H.S., 
Chester, N.J. 

Peter M. Douglas: Rustler's Steak 
House, Stratford, N.J. 

Evelyn Dowling Baxter: Teller, Fishkill 
(N.Y.) National Bank. 

Bruce W. Downs: Assistantship in 
analytical chemistry, University of Cincin- 
nati. 

E. Wayne Dreyman: Graduate study, 
The Lutheran School of Theology, 
Chicago. 

Debra Dubs Weyant: Elementary string 
teacher, Washington County Schools, 
Hagerstown, Md. 

Thomas A. Duncan: Marketing trainee, 
Rheem Manufacturing Co., Linden, N.J. 

William P. Eismann: Assistant 
shipper/receiver, Pennsylvania X-Ray 
Corp., Fort Washington, Pa. 

Suzanne Emanuel Spaid: Co-owner, The 
Woodland Trail Flower Shop, State 
College, Pa. 

Donald J. Ernst: In partnership with his 
father, old and rare books store, 
Selinsgrove. 

P. Christopher Evans: Sales represen- 
tative, Connecticut Mutual Life, New York 
City. 

Sharon Everharl Weaver: Computer 
programmer, U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty 
Co., Baltimore. 

David E. Feltinger: With the F.B.I, in 
Washington, D.C. 

Michael J. Fina: Manager trainee, 
American Bank & Trust Co. of Pa., 
Reading. 

William C. Foote: Manager, Murphy 
Pacific Marine Salvage, Cairo, Egypt. 

Vickie L. Freeman: Staff geologist. The 
Chester Engineers, Coraopolis, Pa. 

Kathleen Gallagher Askew: Working 
toward M.A. in child development, 
Fairleigh Dickinson University. 



NevinJ. Garrett Jr.: Elementary teacher, 
Danville, Pa. 

Kenneth C. Gift: Production manager, 
Gro-El-Ca Lumber Co., Boyertown, Pa. 

Edward G. Gilbert: Sales, warehouse 
management, Hunsicker Co., Allentown, 
Pa. 

Robert A. Grayce: Accountant trainee. 
United Savings and Loan of Trenton, N.J. 

Jeffrey M. Greco: Hahnemann Medical 
School and Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Nancy Griffin Bergen: Britt's Depart- 
ment Store, Williamsport, Pa. 

John J. Guthrie: Self-employed in far- 
ming, grain and beef. 

John C. Hadley: News and public affairs 
reporter, WSEW Radio, Selinsgrove. 

Susan Haines Casso: Professional 
employment couselor, Swift & Swift Per- 
sonnel Service, West Chester, Pa. 

Priscilla A . Hall: Secondary vocal music 
teacher, Marion, N.Y. 

Betsy D. Halpin: Investigator-clerk, 
Sussex County Probation Dept., Newton, 
N.J. 

Perrin C Hamilton Jr.: Management 
trainee, Industrial Valley Bank, 
Philadelphia. 

John B. Hanawall: Staff accountant, 
Coopers & Lybrand, Philadelphia. 

Harold L. Hand Jr.: Graduate study, 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg. 

Raymond J. Hand: Graduate study, 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg. 

Hugh H. Hart: Graduate work in choral 
conducting, Temple University. 

Karen Ann Havrilko: Mathematics 
teacher, Daniel Boone H.S., Birdsboro, Pa. 

Lt. Christopher F. Haver: Offutt Air 
Force Base, Nebraska. 

Ronald A. Heller: Computer program- 
mer, Navy Ships Parts Control Center, 
Defense Activities, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

John D. Herczeg: Bookkeeper-account- 
ant, Lehigh Valley Manpower Program, 
Bethlehem, Pa., currently assigned to 
Northampton County Children's Bureau. 

Sara Hess Meyer: Sales, Gimbels 
Department Store, Harrisburg East Mall. 

John R. Heyman: Sales representative, 
Heywood Corp., Roslyn, Pa. 

Karen L. Highsmith: Elementary vocal 
music teacher, Mifflin Elementary School 
District, Philadelphia. 

Galla Higinbotham: Directress, Youth 
Center "Elysium," Lewistown, Pa. 

Paul R. Hinsch: Laborer, Nassau Com- 
pany Recreation & Parks Dept., Museum 
Services, Old Bethpage, N.Y. 

John H. Hoffman: Staff accountant, 
Price Waterhouse & Co., New York City. 

Debra Horner Douglas: Administrative 
trainee, Equitable Life Assurance Society 



of the U.S., Wilmington, Del. 

Susan E. Hornyak: Technical writer and 
technician-nitrogen development, Engi- 
neering Section, Airco Inc., Murray Hill, 
N.J. 

Geoffrey B. Hunt: Foreman trainee in 
manufacturing. Railroad Products Divi- 
sion of Abex Corp., Calera, Ala. 

Edward S. Kallreider: Owner/operator, 
83 Ski & Sport, Dallastown, Pa. 

Jeanne D. Kauffman: Vocal music 
teacher, Vaughan Elementary School, 
Woodbridge, Va. 

Carol B. Kehler: Research analyst, 
Judiciary Committee of the Pennsylvania 
House of Representatives, Harrisburg. 

Jon C. Kerwin: Business manager, Cen- 
tral Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, (5- 
county educational service), Lewisburg, Pa. 

Robert C. Kessler: Personnel assistant, 
Carlisle (Pa.) Tire & Rubber Co. 

Dennis D. Kieffer: Staff accountant, 
Ernst & Ernst, Harrisburg. 

Donald W. Kiess Jr.: Buyer, Weis 
Markets, Sunbury. 

Robert J. KimbelJr.: Junior accountant, 
Haskins & Sells, Philadelphia. 

Randall S. Kissinger: Cost accountant, 
Celotex Corp., Sunbury. 

Alan J. Kisza: Insurance consultant, 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., Jersey 
City, N.J. 

Judith Kleinfelter Slinsman: Home- 
maker. 

Daniel E. Knipel: Graduate study at the 
Pennsylvania College of Optometry. 

E. Mark Kozin: Employment assistant, 
Geico & Affiliates, Woodbury, N.Y. 

Phyllis A. Kreckman: Graduate 
medieval studies at Bryn Mawr College. 

Kathleen Krivak: Singer/Graflex 
Vocational Evaluator, Devereux School, 
Vocational Rehabilitation Center, Devon. 
Pa. 

Diane B. Kulp: Staff accountant, 
Conestoga Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
Birdsboro, Pa. 

Carol L. Kurlzke: Graduate study. New 
York School of Interior Design. 

Linda Kymer Jeffrey: Housewife and 
mother. 

Susan W. Lang: Consumer Services 
Correspondent, Nabisco, Inc., New York 
City. 

Marsha A. Lehman: Programmer/ana- 
lyst, Eastman Kodak, Rochester, N.Y. 

Pamela A. Lewis: Caseworker, Lutheran 
Welfare Service, Hazleton, Pa. 

Wallace J. Lindsay Jr.: Junior account- 
ant, Haskins & Sells, New York City. 

Nancy J. Lindsten: Secondary vocal 
music teacher, Baltimore County, Towson, 
Md. 

Ronald C. Littley Jr.: Credit manager 
trainee, Pomeroy's Department Store, 



WINTER 1975 



Levittown (Pa.) Shopping Center. 

Virginia L. Long: Hostess, Holiday Inn, 
Danville, Pa. 

Cynthia Lupolt Waller: Instructional 
aide in reading and mathematics, 
Selinsgrove. 

Thomas P. Lust: Graduate study at Penn 
State University and computer program- 
mer in the University libraries. 

Sheryl Lee MacWhorter: Teacher, 
program for the blind, Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital. 

Dean T. Madison: Inventory supervisor, 
P.A. & S. Small Co., York, Pa. 

Gary S. Maggi: Trainee, Devereux 
Foundation, Devon, Pa. 

Diane Mahoney Pivarnik: Director of 
music. Calvary Presbyterian Church, 
Florham Park, N.J. She has completed re- 
quirements for teaching certification in 
New Jersey. 

Michael W. Maneval: Socializing the 
blind retarded, Selinsgrove State School 
and Hospital. 

Joan E. Marshall: Elementary vocal 
music teacher. Magnolia Elementary 
School, Hartford County, Md. 

Joan E. Masser: Staff assistant, Touche 
Ross & Co., Harrisburg. 

John P. Mathews: Professional employ- 
ment counselor, Snelling & Snelling, 
Williamsport, Pa. 

Patrick M. McAfee: Graduate study in 
political science, Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University, Blacksburg. 

William H. McCard Sales represen- 
tative, Moffatt Bearings Co.. Cornwell 
Heights, Pa. 

James B. McCarthy: Research techni- 
cian. National Institutes of Health, 
Bethesda, Md. 

Charles F McLane III: Graduate study- 
in hydrology and water resources at 
Colorado State University. 

James S McClalchy Jr.: Junior account- 
ant. Price Waterhouse, Philadelphia. 

John M. McCrudden: Account analyst, 
Traveler's Insurance Co., Reading, Pa. 

Vicki M. Metz: Secretary, Holiday Inn, 
Lewistown, Pa. 

Bruce A . Morrison: Working toward the 
B.S. degree in nursing at Widener College. 
Also an orderly in out-patient clinic and 
emergency department, Bryn Mawr 
Hospital. 

Francis C. Moyer: Executive internship, 
First National Bank. Danville, Pa. 

Linda Munroe Them: Self-employed. 

Susan E. Neiser: Teaching elementary 
instrumental music, Hornell, N.Y. 

Karen L. Newson: Assistant operations 
coordinator in international department. 
National Liberty Insurance Co., Valley 
Forge, Pa. 

Paul A. Nolle: Systems analyst. 



marketing department. International Com- 
munications Corp., Milgo Electronics, 
Miami, Fla. 

Joyce Oberlin Smar: Graduate study. 
University of Michigan School of Music. 

Ruth Ann Otto: Secretary and future 
travel agent, Waters Travel Service, 
Washington, D.C. 

Capt. Thomas E. Peachey: Instructor of 
U.S. Marine Corps recruits, Mt. Fuji, 
Japan. 

Walter F. Pearce: Special agent, Giorgio 
Agency, Lancaster, Pa. 

Patrick A. Petre: U.S. Marine Corps. 

Beth R Petrie: Admissions represen- 
tative, the Sawyer School, Inc., Clifton, 
N.J. 

Philip D. Popovec: Advance salesman, 
Allegheny Pepsi-Cola Co., Baltimore. 

George F. Potor: Teaching American 
history, psychology and political and 
economic inquiry, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Linda J. Prat:: Instructional aide in 
mathematics and reading, Selinsgrove 
Elementary School. 

Janet Rice Maggi: Associate systems 
representative. Burroughs Corp.. 
Philadelphia. 

Rhonda L. Riddle: Graduate study in 
general/experimental psychology, SUNY 
at Oswego. 

Richard D. Riley: Elementary in- 
strumental music teacher, Hazleton, Pa. 

Marilyn A. Roemer Spanish/English 
teacher, Bensalem Township Sr. H.S., 
Cornwells Heights, Pa. 

Philmer H Rohrbaugh: Auditor, Arthur 
Andersen & Co., Philadelphia. 

R. Gary Ruff: Auditor, Central Penn 
National Bank, Philadelphia. 

Douglas E. Sahesen: Sales WBNR/ 
WFPK Radio, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Ivan G. Samuels: Woodcraftsman 
(internship), Peter's Valley Craftsmen Inc., 
Peter's Valley, N.J. 

Joseph W. Schiller Jr.: English teacher. 
South Jr. H.S., Bloomfield, N.J. 

Christine E. Schmidt: Elementary vocal 
music teacher, Milford (Pa.) Elementary 
School. 

Cora M. Schmidt: Management analyst. 
U.S. Army Materiel Command, Picatinny 
Arsenal, Dover, N.J. 

Philip H. Schreyer III: Graduate study in 
counselor education, Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Robert N. Seebold: Graduate study, 
Temple University Dental School. 

Philip J. Seiferl: Vicryl research techni- 
cian, Chicopee Manufacturing Co., 
Raritan, N.J. 

Cynthia H. Severinsen: Graduate work. 
New England School of Law. 

Margaret W. Shaw: Leasing secretary, 
Charles E. Smith Co., Washington D.C. 



Carey V. Sheaffer: Computer operations 
supervisor. Tri-County National Bank, 
Middleburg, Pa. 

Peter M Sherman: Trainee for retail in- 
dex, A.C. Nielsen Co., Northbrook, 111. 

Judith A. Shipton: Secretary, 
Yorktowne Kitchens, Mifflinburg, Pa. 

Kay D Shroyer: Graduate assistant in 
group piano and master's degree study in 
music, Illinois State University. 

Kathryn B Simpson: School psychology 
M.A. program. University of Bridgeport. 
Also a graduate assistant, teaching 
emotionally disturbed children. Norton 
School. Darien, Ct. 

Benedict J. Smar Jr.: Graduate study, 
University of Michigan School of Music. 

Lynette M. Smith Bank teller, Morris 
County Savings Bank, Morristown, N.J. 

F. Thomas Snyder III: Director, high 
school band, vocal and woodwinds, Cato- 
Meridian Central School, Cato, N.Y. 

Mary E. Sobkowiak: Teacher of senior 
high chorus, general music, art apprecia- 
tion. Catholic H.S., Lancaster, Pa. 

Donna Somerfield: Graduate study in 
violin performance, Peabody Conser- 
vatory. 

Elissa L. Stalhammer Harvey: Office 
manager, Kay Company Jewelers, 
Harrisburg. 

Robert J. Stamm: Staff accountant, 
Ernst & Ernst. Philadelphia. 

Lynne Stansjield: Statistics and business 
analysis, AMP Inc., Harrisburg. 

Keith L Sterling: Systems analyst, 
Philadelphia Saving Fund Society. Phila- 
delphia. 

Charles E. Stevens III: Management 
trainee. Hanover Brands. Hanover. Pa. 

Jill Stevens Fecker: Science teacher, 
Selinsgrove. Last summer she was selected 
to participate in a six-week student training 
program in environmental sciences at 
Shippensburg State College supported by 
the National Science Foundation. 

James A. Stuart III: Graduate study. 
Penn State Capitol Campus. Also 
employed by the Planning Board. City of 
Harrisburg. 

Douglas B. Sutherland: Assistant urban 
planner. Harristown Development Corp., 
Harrisburg. 

William H. Thomas Jr.: Management 
trainee. Mason-Dixon Trucking Co., 
Railway, N.J. 

William B Trousdale: Program director. 
Station WSUS, Franklin, N.J. Last fall he 
took a party of 40 to Nashville. Tenn. to 
visit the new Grand Old Opry House and 
to interview stars of country music. 

Debra K. Tulli: Juvenile probation of- 
ficer. Dauphin County. Harrisburg. 

Judith Turner Thomas: Substitute 
teaching in Rahuay. N.J. 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Frank J. Tuschak Jr.: Special agent, 
Giorgio Agency, Landisville, Pa. 

Alan J. Vpperco: District manager, 
Trenton Times, N.J. 

Donald L. Utter: Director of instrumen- 
tal music. Elk Lake Area School, Dimock, 
Pa. 

Dorothy L. Varvaris: Social worker, 
Carroll County Youth Service Bureau, 
Westminster, Md. 

Bruce A . Vessey: Graduate study in com- 
puter and information sciences. University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Eliese Wagenseil Bohlender: Teaching 
high school home economics and English as 
well as grammar school science. Father Yer- 
mo H.S. and Elementary School, El Paso, 
Tex. 

Patricia R. Wagner: Project director of 
an information and referral service, Clay 
County (Fla.) Council on Aging. 

J Richard Walker: Quality control 
technician, Chicopee Manufacturing Co., 
Raritan, N.J. 

Alan W. Wasserbach: Junior account- 
ant, Schiavi, Patterson & Horty, 
Philadelphia. 

Alan R. Waters: Management training 
program. Household Finance Co., 
Newark, N.J. 

Cheryl Weanl McAfee: Private secre- 
tary, Cunningham Insurance Agency, Rad- 
ford. Va. 



Sharon R. Weaver: Fiscal office. Bureau 
of Consumer Protection, Harrisburg. 

Hendryk S. Weeks Jr.: Teacher in the 
program for the blind, Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital. 

Zona M. Weimer: Teaching 8th grade 
English, Upper Dauphin Middle School, 
Lykens, Pa. 

GuntherJ. Weisbrich: M.S. candidate in 
geology. Boston College. 

Carol L. Wells: Varied duties at ski area, 
Mt. Mansfield Co. Inc., Stowe, Vt. 

Grace L. Wellon: Graduate work in 
elementary education. University of 
Bridgeport. Also a teacher's aide in Old 
Saybrook, Conn. 

Tonna J. Wendl: Chemist in organic 
research and development, Hercules Inc., 
Glens Falls, N.Y. 

Jar! R. Weyant: Salesman, Teledyne 
Landis Machine, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Chris L. Wheeland: Teaching assistant 
and graduate student in physics, Bucknell 
University. 

Karen White Strawoet: Commercial 
credit analyst, The Fidelity Bank, 
Philadelphia. 

William A. Wiles: Assistant manager. 
Villa Louise Enterprises, Monrovia, 
Liberia. 

Wendy Williams Carlini: Counselor, 
Elwyn (Pa.) Institute. 

Rodger J Williard: Studying at Penn 



State in preparation for entry into dental 
school. 

Darryl L Willis: Graduate study in 
theatre arts (acting and directing), Penn 
State University. 

Gail M. Wisdo: Graduate work, 
Katharine Gibbs School, New York City. 

Chere R. Wise: Provider Affairs Depart- 
ment, Group Hospitalization, Inc., 
Washington, D.C. 

Robert B. Witmer: R.B. Witmer & Co., 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Deborah J Wine: Auditor. Chase 
Manhattan Bank, N.A., New York City. 

Kathryn E. Wohlsen: Graduate study, 
Dickinson School of Law, Carlisle, Pa. 

Larry D. Wolfgang: Graduate work in 
nuclear engineering, North Carolina State 
University. 

Cynthia Wood: Graduate work in 
geology, Bryn Mawr College. 

Karen M. Woodring: Drug rehabilita- 
tion counselor. Horizon House, 
Philadelphia. 

Nancy Wright Sliehl: Credit file 
operator TRW Credit Bureau, Fairfield, 
N.J. 

Susan L. Zierdt: Subscriber information 
assistant. Medical Services of D.C, 
Washington, D.C. 



THIS YEAR, ALUMNI WEEKEND IS MAY 2, 3, and 4 

Golf and tennis tournaments . . . Awards . . . Reunions of classes ending in and 5 . . . "Car- 
ousel" . . . Dinner dance . . . etc., etc. 

AND 

You'll be asked to vote on this amendment to Article V of the Alumni Association Constitution 
and Bylaws, referring to Executive Board and proposed by Executive Board: 

The Executive Board shall consist of the officers, fifteen members elected at large by ballot 
by the alumni body, the past presidents, alumni representatives to the Board of Directors, alum- 
ni representatives to the University Athletic Council, and one designated representative of the 
Senior Class. IN THE EVENT OF A TIE, THE FIVE OFFICERS WILL VOTE TO ELECT THE 
WINNER. The President of the University shall be an ex officio member of the Executive Board. 

AFTER ALUMNI WEEKEND, WHAT? 

Well, if you're looking for something a little different, how about our Alumni Association Cruise 
on the S.S. Rotterdam? She leaves from New York on May 10 for 7 full days, with stops at 
Nassau and Bermuda. If you are interested, call Buss Carr immediately! 

BACCALAUREATE and COMMENCEMENT ARE MAY 31 
1975 HOMECOMING (FOOTBALL vs LYCOMING) IS OCTOBER 4 



WINTER 1975 



11 



THE WEATHER FROM SUSQUEHANNA 



EACH MORNING Selinsgrove radio station 
WSEW's listeners hear the voice of Susquehanna's En- 
vironmental Studies director Dr. Frank Fletcher 
delivering the "most local" weather report available in 
the area. 

However, Fletcher chuckles at those who think he 
possesses a vast array of special, highly sophisticated 
equipment. All forecasters, he explains, use the same 
analysis and prognosis maps transmitted via Western 
Union from the National Weather Service in 
Washington, D.C. What makes Fletcher's forecast 
unique in the Selinsgrove area is that it is the only one 
that interprets the national data solely and specifically 
in terms of what it means for this locality. Most 
weather reports carried by newspapers, radio and 
television are based on a much larger area, Fletcher 
notes, and thus are less accurate in terms of a specific 
spot such as Selinsgrove. 

The S.U. weather station was instituted in mid- 
1972 and is supported through a grant from the 
National Science Foundation. At the outset the 
"station" was merely an instrument shelter on the roof 
of the Science Hall that recorded temperature, humidi- 
ty and rainfall. Fletcher's first radio weather reports 
told only what the weather had been. "Not very in- 
teresting," he admits. During the summer of 1973 the 
equipment for receiving weather map transmissions 
from Washington went into operation, and the 
forecasting began. 

By then the weather station had been moved into a 
building at the Penn Valley Airport in Selinsgrove, but 
Fletcher is currently making another move. In order to 
allow easier access by students, the weather station is 
being moved into the new environmental studies 
laboratory building nearing completion on campus 
next to the minidorm. This will permit intensification 
of the University's course work in meteorology. 

Fletcher's weather reports are not only "local," 
but are also the most "in-depth" in the region. The 




weather center publishes a monthly newsletter, called 
Weather Vane, which gives detailed information on 
temperature, degree days and precipitation for the past 
month, and anticipated average temperature, degree 
days and precipitation for the upcoming month. This 
information is used by farmers, building contractors, 
and people trying to estimate their heating bills. 

In addition to receiving national weather informa- 
tion from Washington, the Susquehanna weather sta- 
tion also provides detailed information on local con- 
ditions to the National Weather Service. The local data 
becomes part of the national service's long-term 
records on which its extended forecasts are based. 

Fletcher says that the Selinsgrove area is a 
"meteorologist's nightmare" because it lies right on the 
dividing line between "ocean weather and mountain 
weather." 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




He says that his 12-hour forecasts have a 90 per- 
cent chance of being correct if good weather is forecast, 
and a 50 percent chance if bad weather is forecast. A 
24-hour forecast is correct half the time if it's for good 
weather, somewhat less if for bad weather. 

Good weather is easier to predict, says Fletcher, 
because high pressure systems are broad and stable. 
Predicting a storm is difficult, he says, because of rapid 
changes in its speed and direction. Also, he notes, a 
two-degree difference in temperature makes the 
difference between one inch of rain and ten inches of 
snow. 

Despite these odds, Frank Fletcher's is probably 
S.U.'s most-heard voice. Listeners include the 
Bucknell University astronomer, who tunes in in the 
morning to listen if he will have clear skies for his class 
at night. 



Environmental Institute technical aide Steve Herrold '69 
spends a great deal of time monitoring dials and gauges, 
while also leaching part-time in the Physics Department. 
Below. Dr. Fletcher shows public information director Peter 
Silvestri some of the data transmitted to Susquehanna's 
Community Weather Facility at the Penn Valley Airport. 




WINTER 1975 



13 



The greatest and, in fact, the only 
impulse to human progress is the 
spark of altruism in the individual 
human being. 



—HERBERT C. HOOVER 



Toward Permanence in Higher Education 



by D. EDGAR HUTCHISON 



This is the second in a series of articles about 
the University's deferred giving program. Susquehanna 
encourages alumni and friends to consider the 
possibility of providing for the University in their 
wills or establishing annuities or trusts in favor 
of the college. D. Edgar Hutchison '54 serves as 
associate in development for deferred giving. These 
comments are provided for information only and are 
not to be construed as legal advice. The purpose 
is to have alumni and friends think about estate 
planning and the possibility of a deferred gift to 
Susquehanna. For further information, without 
any obligation, please contact Mr. Hutchison at home 
or at the Development Office at Susquehanna. 
Inquiries will be treated with strict confidence. 



THE NEED to sustain our various institutions has 
never been more evident. From its inception in 1858, 
Susquehanna University has attempted to inculcate in 
its students a true respect for learning as well as an un- 
derstanding of the traditions and beliefs of the Chris- 
tian faith. The University recognizes the need to ensure 
permanency by further solidifying those many 
strengths which have made the Susquehanna ex- 
perience a most relevant one for over 7000 living alum- 
ni in all walks of life. 

To help guarantee a meaningful education for 
future generations of students, Susquehanna looks to 
its alumni and friends to provide that spark of altruism 
needed to perpetuate the University and its program. 
Those who can must be encouraged to search for ways 
to assist in strengthening the future of Susquehanna! 

Former President Herbert Hoover spoke the 
words quoted above almost three decades ago, and he 
spoke both as an observer and as a participant. He will 



be remembered as a leading spokesman for American 
individualism. It was not surprising, therefore, that he 
saw the spark of altruism coming not from society as a 
whole but from the individual human being. The Sus- 
quehanna University Deferred Giving Program pro- 
vides a vehicle through which you may lend a degree of 
permanency to a most venerable institution. 

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEQUESTS 

The strength of Susquehanna University has been 
sustained over many years by the generosity of alumni 
and friends. Historically, alumni have helped to un- 
derwrite the cost of education for students who, if re- 
quired to pay the full cost of their undergraduate educa- 
tion, would have found this cost prohibitive. As each 
succeeding class has graduated and taken its place in 
society, the University has encouraged their support of 
Susquehanna to assure the same opportunity for future 
generations of students. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Support for Susquehanna takes many shapes and 
forms. Few individuals have the opportunity to give 
substantial sums during their lifetime, but almost 
everyone can eventually do something equally impor- 
tant and equally permanent by guaranteeing quality 
education for future generations. 

It is estimated that 90 percent of a college's en- 
dowment funds come from bequests. Endowment is 
crucial in providing income with which to generate new 
and expanded educational programs and for 
scholarship aid and faculty salaries. Since 1965, Sus- 
quehanna has received over $1,000,000 in bequests. 
These testamentary gifts have provided strength and 
vitality for the institution as well as permanent recogni- 
tion for the donors. Bequests have been used to es- 
tablish scholarship funds, to memorialize buildings and 
particular rooms within buildings, to perpetuate one's 
annual gift and to establish special memorial book 
funds and departmental endowments. 

The University has been the recipient of bequests 
ranging from $100 to $500,000, and each has played a 
major role in the advancement of the institution. As in- 
dicated, the purpose of such gifts have varied but each, 
regardless of size, played a large role in assuring that 
the Susquehanna type of education would be available 
for many years to come. 

SEEK YOUR LAWYER'S ADVICE 

It is important that every person, regardless of his 
means, have a will, and the writing of this technical 
document should always be entrusted to an attorney. 
The purposes to be achieved by a will, however, are 
solely the responsibility of the testator. Only through a 
will may an individual direct the disposition of his es- 
tate. Without a will, an estate will be distributed ac- 
cording to the law and such distribution may bear no 
resemblance to the individual's intentions. Most ex- 
perts recommend that a will be drawn as early in life as 
practical, then revised periodically as circumstances 
change. 

ADDING A CODICIL 

If a will has already been drawn, and if no major 
revision is involved, a bequest may be provided through 
the addition of a codicil. It is a simple procedure, but 
here again an attorney's services are essential. 



BEQUESTS CAN BE ECONOMICAL 

When making a will, a person usually uses this 
time to assign priorities and to arrange for an orderly 
distribution of his assets. This is also the time to con- 
sider a bequest to Susquehanna University. Usually, 
the prime reason for considering such a bequest is the 
testator's belief in Susquehanna and in private higher 
education. However, additional incentive is often 
provided by the tax benefits which may accrue to the 
donor's estate and to the beneficiaries. 

The Federal government has always encouraged 
the use of bequests as a vehicle for charitable giving. 
When a bequest is made to Susquehanna, for example, 
there is an unlimited deduction for the value of the 
property left to the University. By making such a be- 
quest, the effect is to reduce the Federal tax obligation 
on the estate. Since the Federal government does not 
impose any limitations on the amount of deduction, a 
person could leave his entire estate to charity and com- 
pletely eliminate the Federal Estate Tax. 

More realistically, the following table denotes the 
cost to an estate of a $10,000 charitable bequest to 
Susquehanna. 



Taxable Estate* 


Federal 


Net Cost 


Tax 


(before gift) 


Tax Rate 


of Gift 


Savings 


$ 50,000 


22% 


$7,800 


$2,200 


$120,000 


30% 


$7,000 


$3,000 


$260,000 


32% 


$6,800 


$3,200 



By the same token, a bequest of $25,000 to Sus- 
quehanna would have the following effect. 



axable Estate* 


Federal 


Net Cost 


Tax 


(before gift) 


Tax Rate 


of Gift 


Savings 


$ 50,000 


22% 


$19,500 


$5,500 


$120,000 


30% 


$17,500 


$7,500 


$260,000 


32% 


$17,000 


$8,000 



In summary, a donor with a taxable estate of $50,- 
000 can make a $10,000 bequest to Susquehanna at a 



* Amount left after subtracting all deductions and the $60,000 exemp- 
tion. 



WINTER 1975 



15 



AN UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST 

I give to Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pennsylvania, $ dollars. 

I give to Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pennsylvania the sum of $ dollars, 

the income only to be used for general purposes of 
the University. 

(Optional addition: This gift is made in 
memory of and shall be known 

as the Fund.) 



A BEQUEST FOR A SPECIFIED PURPOSE 

I give to Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pennsylvania, $ dollars. This gift 

shall be used both as to principal and income for 
(description of the purpose of the gift.) 

A BEQUEST THAT IS TO BE HELD AS A PER- 
MANENT FUND, THE INCOME ONLY TO BE 
USED FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE 

I give to Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pennsylvania, $ dollars, the in- 

come only to be used for (description of the pur- 
pose of the gift.) 

A BEQUEST TO PERPETUATE ANNUAL GIVING 

I give to Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pennsylvania $ dollars, the prin- 

cipal of which shall be invested and reinvested as 
the Directors of the University may deem best, the 
income only to be used at the discretion of the said 
Board of Directors for its general purposes, and 
said income to be recorded with respect to the 
testator and the Class of in the records of the an- 
nual Susquehanna University Fund of Susquehan- 
na University. 



net cost to the estate of $7,800. Optionally, a $25,000 
bequest will cost the donor only $19,500. This 
represents prudent planning which can serve both to 
provide tor Susquehanna's future and result in signifi- 
cant tax savings. 

SOMETHING OF PERMANENCE 

Future generations of students can look forward 
to a meaningful education at Susquehanna only if those 
of the present generation of alumni and friends con- 
tinue the tradition of adding substance to the Universi- 
ty. The opportunities are many and the sample forms 
given here provide examples of how one may do 
something of permanence at Susquehanna. Dollar 
signs are used for illustrative purposes; but, because of 
the fluctuation in the value of the dollar and, therefore, 
the value of an estate, many donors specify a certain 
percentage of the net estate for each bequest. 

A WORD ABOUT CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY 

The maker of a will has the right to provide for a 
contingent beneficiary in the event that the principal 
beneficiaries do not survive him. It is suggested that 
Susquehanna University would be an appropriate con- 
tingent beneficiary. 

The University is pleased to provide this informa- 
tion about bequests. Questions and additional informa- 
tion can be secured by writing to: 

The Development Office 
Susquehanna University 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
All inquiries will be treated as confidential and 
there is no obligation involved. 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans On Parade 



x'21 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence G. McGuigan. 
2425 Raleigh Dr., York, Pa., celebrated 
their 59th wedding anniversary on October 
16. Clarence is retired from the Maple 
Press where he was a pressman for 46 years. 

x'28 

The Rev. Dr. Carl Neudoerffer retired 
from the ministry after 46 years, having 
spent the last 24 years at St. Michael's 
Lutheran Church in Allentown. 

George A. Hepner is president of the 
board of trustees of the Selinsgrove State 
School & Hospital. 

'29 

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Todd 
celebrated their 64th wedding anniversary 
in June. Dr. Todd was 93 in September. 
(See Deaths.) 

h'30 

The Rev. Dr. N.J. Gould Wiekey 
received the Gettysburg College Alumni 
Association's Distinguished Alumni Cer- 
tificate. A retired clergyman, former 
professor and dean of men at Concordia 
College and president of Carthage College, 
he was for many years executive secretary 
of the Lutheran Educational Conference of 
North America. 

'31 

H. Vernon Blough retired as wire editor 
of The Johnstown Tribune-Democrat on 
whose staff he served for 28 years. The 
former Susquehanna Alumnus editor and 
general alumni secretary was recipient of 
the 1964 S.U. Alumni Award for Service. 
Vernon's successor is Penn G. Dively '34. 
who was city editor. 

'32 

W. Fredrick Wilks retired as vice 
president, security investments, from 
Prudential Insurance Co., Canadian head 
office. He has remained on several boards 
of directors of Canadian companies. He 
and his wife, the former Anne 
Dunkelberger '32. now live at 60-G 
Guilford La., Williamsville, N.Y. 14221. 

'35 

Dr. Erie I. Shobert was the recipient of 
the Ragnar Holm Scientific Achievement 
Award given in memory of Dr. Holm to a 
person who has made significant con- 



tributions in the area of science, applica- 
tion, or education related to electrical con- 
tact phenomena. 

Russell W. Eisenhower retired as prin- 
cipal of the Northumberland Vo-Tech 
School in Shamokin, Pa. He was in educa- 
tion for 38 years. 

'36 

The Rev. Dr. Ralph I. Shockey is Gover- 
nor of District 764, Rotary International, 
covering the southern part of New Jersey. 

Charles L. Fasold retired as high school 
principal at Selinsgrove. He was in educa- 
tion for 38 years, almost all of it in 
Selinsgrove. 

'38 

Charles Slauffer and his wife have moved 
to Arizona where they are making their per- 
manent home in Sun City. 

'40 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel 
coordinated the fifth annual jazz marathon. 
The All Nite Soul and Jazz Vespers is held 
the 4th Sunday before Christmas. More 
than 200 musicians and singers play non- 
stop for 14 hours in this Advent Mass. 

'43 

Lawrence M. Isaacs is now executive vice 
president, financial group, of Allis 
Chalmers, Milwaukee, Wis. 

'44 

The Rev. Henry F. Hopkins is district 
superintendent of the State College district 
of the United Methodist Church. 

'45 

The Rev. Celo V. Leitzel is now pastor 
of four local Lutheran congregations: 
Freeburg, Mt. Pleasant Mills, Middlecreek 
Dam and Kratzerville. He formerly shared 
the pastorate of Sharon Lutheran Church, 
Selinsgrove. 

'46 

Dr. Emily Botdorf Schmalslieg read a 
paper, "An Interdisciplinary Approach to 
an Elementary Music Curriculum," at the 
meeting of the International Society for 
Music Education in Perth, Australia, and 
met in an advisory capacity with the Music 
Board of the Australian Council for the 
Arts. 



'48 

Joseph R. Williard. regional personnel 
manager of Nationwide Insurance Co., was 
Nationwide's representative when the com- 
pany received an award for support of the 
Tri-County Opportunities Industrializa- 
tion Center in Harrisburg. 

'49 

William H. Poust is the manager of 
Pomeroy's new department store in the 
Colonial Park Plaza, Harrisburg. 

Jane Southwick Malhias spent last 
summer furthering her studies as a lyric- 
coloratura soprano at the Padagogische 
Akademie in Graz, Austria. She was 
selected through competitive audition to 
perform the soprano solos in the Lord 
Nelson Mass by F. Joseph Haydn, per- 
formed at the Stist Rem on the Feast of the 
Assumption. She is studying under John 
Magnus, associate professor of music at 
Susquehanna, who was also a member of 
the voice faculty of the concert studio of the 
American Institute of Musical Studies in 
Graz. 

Frances Lybarger Zlock is an associate 
broker for Rolison & Sons, Real Estate, 
Langhorne, Pa., and is a Notary Public. 
She also enters about twelve local tennis 
tournaments annually as a part-time 
professional. Frances and husband Evan 
'49, have six sons; the second, Gilbert, is a 
freshman at Susquehanna. 

'50 

Mildred Leeser Fasold attended a six- 
week graduate-level program for junior and 
senior high school guidance counselors at 
Boston University sponsored by the 
General Electric Foundation. She is super- 
visor of guidance services for the Shikel- 
lamy schools, Sunbury. 

Louis Santangelo is now in real estate 
sales with Jack Gaughen, Realtor, Camp 
Hill, Pa. 

x'52 

J Robert Dunlap made his first 
appearance with the St. Paul Opera 
Association's Summer Festival singing the 
role of Alberich in Siegfried. 

'53 

Joseph H Heffner is now living at 145 S. 
Maple Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. 90212. 

Leonard A. Carlson was the subject of a 
feature newspaper article presenting his 



WINTER 1975 



17 



ideas on pipe organs. He build organs and 
prefers to build only two or three a year, 
with the emphasis on quality. His wife is the 
former Carol Ahr x'54. 

Joan Sechrist Thompson is teaching 8th 
grade earth science in Rochester, N.Y. She 
and her husband have two daughters and 
they live at 19 Bryn Mawr Rd., Rochester, 
N.Y. 14524. 

Robert Sleffy, his wife and son joined 
two National Geographic Society explorers 
through the Amazon River in South 
America last summer. 

'54 

Ronald F. Goodman spent the last school 
year on sabbatical leave making a zig-zag 
trip around the world visiting the seven con- 
tinents. His replacement as elementary 
music teacher at Red Lion, Pa. was Alice 
Marie Shue '73. 

Loretta Borry Fausnacht was promoted 
to assistant vice president by the American 
Bank & Trust Co. of Pa. at Reading. 

The Rev. William F. Bastian, pastor of 
Driesbach United Church of Christ, 
Lewisburg, Pa. and his congregation 
recently celebrated a note-burning erasing 
the debt for a new building. 

'55 

Ivors A vols was elected vice president of 
the Project Management Institute, Drexel 
Hill, Pa. In this position, he is responsible 
for coordination of technology, research, 
education, communications and profes- 
sional liaison functions of the association. 
He is a senior member of the management 
consulting staff at Arthur D. Little, Inc., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

'56 

Mary Jane Solomon Penn is substitute 
teaching in Albuquerque schools and gives 
private voice and piano lessons in her home. 
She and her husband. Father John W., 
Episcopalian priest, and four children are 
now living at 6616 Leander N.E., Albu- 
querque, N. Mex. 87109. 

'57 

Gary K. Schroeder, executive vice 
president, sales and marketing, of the La- 
Z-Boy Chair Co., was elected president of 
the National Association of Furniture 
Manufacturers at a recent meeting in 
Louisville, Ky. 

Jack K. Bishop was promoted to mana- 
ger, corporate employment programs, for 
Hershey Foods Corp. The areas of his 
responsibility include coordinating the 
recruiting efforts of various subsidiaries 
and Corporate Affirmative Action. 

Richard H. Love, special agent of 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co., 



was elected first vice president of the firm's 
Special Agents Association. 

'58 

David R Boyer of Linglestown, Pa., was 
appointed associate director of program 
operations of the Susquehanna Valley 
Regional Medical Program, encompassing 
27 counties in Central Pennsylvania. The 
agency implements health care improve- 
ment projects. 

William M. Rohrbach was appointed 
manager of the Shamokin office of the 
State Bureau of Employment Security. 

Louis J. Heinze was named senior high 
principal in the Richland, Pa., school dis- 
trict. 

'59 

Ronald G. Aller is controller of the 
American Life Insurance Co.. Wilmington. 
Del. He and his wife, the former Barbara 
Angle x'6l, have three children and live at 
46 Bridlebrook La., Newark, Del. 19711. 

Jack E. Cisney, associate professor of 
business administration at West Virginia 
Northern Community College, was 
awarded a full scholarship to participate in 
an Asian seminar in the Republic of China 
last summer. The program included three 
weeks at the National Chengchi University 
and a two-week tour of the island including 
a visit to the island of Quemoy. 

'61 

The Rev. James C. Papada is pastor of 
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. His wife is the former Ann L. 
Schaefer '62 and the family resides in 
Kingston, Pa. 

The Rev. Gilbert C. Askew is now assis- 
tant to the president of the New Jersey 
Synod, Lutheran Church in America. He 
has a displaced staff position of the Division 
for Mission in North America of the LCA, 
with responsibility for the urban church, 
issues of justice and social change, college 
and university work, and ecumenical 
relations. His wife, the former Lynn 
Hassinger '57 is a counselor in the schools 
of Piscataway, N.J. 

'62 

Judith A. Blee was a delegate from the 
Selinsgrove Alumnae Chapter of Sigma 
Alpha Iota to its national convention in 
Kansas City. 

The Rev. Robert W. Breitwieser is now 
pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, 
London. Ontario, Canada. 

Elliot Edwards was appointed music 
coordinator of the Tunkhannock, Pa. 
schools, where he has taught for the past 1 2 
years. 



Dr. Charles R. Bowen is in the private 
practice of oral surgery and teaching at the 
University of Vermont Medical School and 
Center. He and his wife and three boys live 
at R.D. 2, Grove La., Shelburne. Vt. 05482. 

'63 

Capt. Dennis P. Woodruffwas decorated 
with his second award of the U.S. Air Force 
Commendation Medal in recent cere- 
monies at Vandenberg AFB, Calif. He was 
cited for meritorious service as a missile 
combat crew commander at Grand Forks 
AFB, N.D. He is now an instructor with a 
unit of SAC at Vandenberg. 

James C. Black, assistant vice president 
and cashier of Tri-County National Bank, 
was transferred to Selinsgrove where he is 
involved with loan functions, customer 
relations and operations of the office and is 
responsible for marketing functions. 

Donna Robb Graybill is teaching 
elementary music in the Greenwood 
schools, Millerstown, Pa. 

The award-winning East Pennsboro 
Panther Marching Band is under the direc- 
tion of David Hackenberg and Nate Ward 
with assistance from Richard Semke '69. 
The band provided pre-game and halftime 
entertainment at the Baltimore Colts vs. 
Cincinnati Bengals game on November 3. 
The performance marked its third NFL 
appearance of the 1974 season. The 
Panthers have won numerous awards and 
represented Pennsylvania in the 1973 
Presidential Inauguration Parade. 

Joseph R. Joyce joined Ryan Homes, 
Inc. in Pittsburgh as vice president for per- 
sonnel. His wife is the former Carol 
Bollinger '64. 

'64 

Pamela Kay is now a field director for the 
Vermont Girl Scout Council. Her new ad- 
dress is School St., Manchester Center, Vt. 
05255. 

Patricia Shintay Spoils is a part-time 
Spanish teacher in the schools of Cin- 
naminson, N.J. 

Dr. Alan Bachrach completed Colby 
College's 10-week Lancaster course in 
ophthalmology. He is one of fewer than 40 
animal eye specialists in the country. 

George Sadosuk was promoted to 
development specialist of Thiokol Fibers 
Division, Waynesboro. Va. 

'65 

G. Wayne Miller is teaching social 
studies and English in Mifflinburg, Pa. 

Paul W Ernst, director of children's ser- 
vices at the Topton (Pa.) Lutheran Home, 
was appointed a part-time instructor in 
social welfare at Kutztown State College. 

James L Zimmerman has started the 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



M.B.A. program at Golden Gate Universi- 
ty in San Francisco. He lives at 39 Gaviota 
Way, San Francisco, Calif. 94127. 

Thomas M. Pieschl was appointed in- 
structor in the university library at the 
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, 
Colo. 80639. 

Dr. David A. Koch and his wife of Hunt- 
ington Valley have been installed as 
president-elect of the Pennsylvania Op- 
tometric Association and trustee for 
education and research of the auxiliary 
respectively. Dave is a recognized authority 
on children's visual problems. 

Roger Kuntz passed his real estate 
brokers examination and is an associate 
broker with Bob Yost, Inc., York, Pa. 

Charles W. Fouquelx is a sales represen- 
tative with the Chicago Title Insurance 
Company in East Orange, N.J. He and his 
wife live at 1 1 12 E. Central Ave., Seaside 
Park, N.J. 08752. 

'66 

Doranne G. Polcrack is now assistant to 
the president of Associated Colleges of the 
Midwest. Her address is 1030 N. State 
Pkwy., Apt. 5-K, Chicago, 111. 60610. 

H. Robert Collings x is selling insurance 
for Columbus Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
out of Harrisburg. He is also a part-time 
radio announcer for WSEW radio, 
Selinsgrove. 

'67 

The Rev. Richard J. Moore was 
appointed pastor of the United 
Presbyterian Church of Cedar Grove, N.J. 

Lt. John A. Norton was designated a 
patrol plane commander for Patrol 
Squadron Eight at the Naval Air Station, 
Brunswick, Me. He commands a 13-man 
flight crew and is responsible for the execu- 
tion of ocean surveillance, aerial photogra- 
phy, and search and rescue missions. His 
wife is the former Barbara Smith '68. 

Harry Deith is now with the First 
National Bank of South Carolina in the in- 
stallment loan department. His wife, the 
former Lynn Ortig '68, is with the Lex- 
ington County Sheriffs Department Detec- 
tive Division as a juvenile officer. They 
live at Rt. 3, Box 249, Chapin, S.C. 29036. 

Frank F. MatlaJr. x is now head football 
coach at Belvidere (N.J.) H.S. 

'68 

Marilyn Pierce Cromwell was promoted 
to accounting officer by North Carolina 
National Bank, Charlotte. 

'69 

David C. Botts was named accounting 
manager of the new Ridge Home plant in 
Milesburg, Pa. He previously held the same 




Father Andrew Greeley, second from left, a prominent Roman Catholic priest, 
educator, sociologist and author, visited the Susquehanna campus in December to 
preach in Chapel on Sunday morning and deliver a public lecture. Here, he is greeted 
by University Chaplain Edgar S. Brown as Father Joseph C. Hilberl of St. Michael the 
Archangel Church in Sunbury and President Weber join in the welcome. Father Greeley, 
an eloquent analyst of church problems and those of young people, has written 30 
books and dozens of articles. He is director of the center for the study of American 
pluralism of the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, 
where he also lectures, and professor of higher education at the University of Illinois. 
He is particularly noted for his skills in making the spiritual teachings o] 
Christianity relevant to the everyday needs of contemporary Americans. 



position at the firm's Conshohocken plant. 
Ridge Homes is a division of Evans Product 
Co., of Portland, Ore., the largest home 
manufacturer east of the Mississippi with 
more than 200 dealers in 21 states. 

Robert H. Ray has been promoted to 
assistant cashier of Franklin National 
Bank, Paramus, N.J. His wife is the former 
Carol Scherb '70. 

Linda laeger Poinsett is music director at 
Trinity Methodist Church, Newport News, 
Va. Her husband, Richard '68. has com- 
pleted duty with the USMC and is with the 
Legal Aid Society in Newport News prior 
to joining a law firm in the spring. 

Robert O. Jesberg earned his master's 
degree in secondary education at Temple 
University and has also received a cer- 
tificate in secondary school administration 
from the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education. He and his wife Ruth are 
teaching at William Tennant Intermediate 
H.S., Warminster, Pa. 

Randy L. Gehrel. in addition to teaching 
music at Steelton Highspire H.S., is serving 
as director of the marching band at 
Millersville State College. His wife is the 
former Melinda Mark. 

Robert Slibler teaches trumpet on the 



music faculty of Southwest Minnesota 
State College, Marshall. His address is 202 
W. Redwood, Marshall, Minn. 56258. 

John B. Deibler Jr. was granted a year's 
leave of absence from his music teaching 
duties at the Haverford School. He is 
studying in Hungary. 

70 

Jane M alanchuk Schuessler received her 
M.L.S. from Long Island University and is 
a librarian for the Library Association of 
Portland, Ore. Her address is 16240 S.W. 
Parker Rd., Lake Oswego, Ore. 97034. 

Gary P. Ulrich is band director at Cedar 
Cliff H.S. , Camp Hill, Pa. He was formerly 
band director at Pottstown Jr. H.S. He is 
married to the former Lois Kucharik '72. 

Michael A. Cummins was transferred to 
the corporate office of Owens-Corning 
Fiberglass in Toledo as supervisor of 
production planning and purchasing for the 
non-corrosive products division. He and his 
wife, the former Eileen Lack x'70. live at 
4552 Tamworth Rd., Sylvania, Ohio. 
43560. 

Margaret E Isaacson is assistant direc- 
tor in the Career Development Placement 
Center at Bloomsburg State College. 



WINTER 1975 



19 



71 

Charles G. Xorbert completed course 
work for his M.A. in modern European 
history at Western Kentucky University. 
He was awarded a teaching assistantship by 
the history department of Memphis State 
University in order to work on his Ph.D. 
His wife, Jessica Schuberi '71 , is a manager 
for Gerber's of Memphis. Their new ad- 
dress is 3437 Barclay, No. 6, Memphis, 
Tenn. 38111. 

Richard A. Strawser is teaching 
sophomore and junior theory in the School 
of Music at the University of Connecticut 
while working on his doctoral thesis in com- 
position at the Eastman School of Music. 
He has also started a university perform- 
ance group specializing in contemporary 
music. His address is (c/o Booth), West 
Willington, Ct. 06279. 

William L.S. Landes III graduated from 
the University of Louisville School of Law 
and was admitted to practice law in the 
state of Kentucky. He is currently a law 
clerk to the judge in the 12th Judicial 
District of Kentucky under a grant of the 
Kentucky Crime Commission. His address 
is 3726 Beaufort La., Louisville. Ky. 40207. 

Gary J. Mailen was recently awarded his 
license to practice as a C.P.A. in the state of 
New York. 

Dennis Packard is a teaching assistant 
and working on his M.A. in Canadian- 
American studies at the University of 
Maine. His address is 206 N. Estabrooke 
Hall, University of Maine, Orono, Me. 
04473. 

Donald L. Van Gilder received his juris 
doctor degree from Dickinson School of 
Law and is now a clerk for the Lehigh 
County (Pa.) Court of Common Pleas. 

Donald W. McClain received his 
master's degree in political science from 
Montclair State College and is a teacher 
and head football coach at Wallington 
(N.J.) H.S. His wife, the former Jane 
Brockway '72, is a claims approver for 
Equitable Life Assurance, Oradell, N.J. 
Their address is 25 Locust Ave., Emerson, 
N.J. 07630. 

Frederick R Reilly is an instructor in 
sociology at Juniata College. 

William R. Spory x, is manager of the 
Freeman Shoe Co., Hanover, Pa. 

72 

Gail A. Fullman is a data controller at 
Lehigh University. 

Nancy Porch Swope is a clerk-typist for 
William H. Rorer, Inc., Fort Washington, 
Pa. 

Rebecca Schumacher has completed the 
requirements for the M.B.A. at Lehigh 
University and is continuing on for a doctor 
of arts in economics. She holds a graduate 



assistantship in the department of econom- 
ics. Her new address is 6 SMAGS. Apt. 
131. R. D. 5. Bethlehem, Pa. 18105. 

David W. Mangle and his wife, the 
former Barbara Steiler '73, are teaching in- 
strumental music in the Glace Bay, Nova 
Scotia schools. Barbara specializes in 
woodwinds and Dave, a brass specialist, is 
also chairman of the department. They are 
applying for landed immigrant status. 

Donald Henke x. a wholesale meat 
purveyor, has opened Sandy's Meats at 441 
E. Railway Ave., Paterson, N.J. 

Christine E. Smith x, received her 
master's degree in library science from 
SUNY at Albany and is with the Brooklyn 
Public Library in its Borough Park branch. 
Her address is 2665 Homerest Ave., Apt. 6- 
H, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11235. 

73 

Betsy Haas Polakiewic: is teaching in the 
Hillsborough County public schools, Tam- 
pa, Fla. 

Robert G. Vogel is the new organist and 
choirmaster of Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Staten Island, N.Y., where he presides over 
a three-manual Casavant pipe organ and 
directs three choirs. 

Roy S. Tuomisto is cooperative bowling 
manager at the YMCA, Jersey Shore, Pa., 
as well as resident social director. His wife, 
the former Gale Moore '73. is teaching 
earth and space science in the Jersey Shore 
school district. 

Robert Veach is completing his clinical 
training in physical therapy at the Geisinger 
Medical Center in Danville, Pa. 



"J BO" 



ASKEW-GALLAGHER 
Kathleen Gallagher '74 to Richard R. 
Askew, August 10, 1972. Mr. Askew 
received his M.A. from Kean College and is 
doing postgraduate work at Montclair 
State College. He is an elementary teacher 
in River Vale, N.J. / 38 Nottingham Ct., 
Montvale, N.J. 07645. 

FENSTERMACHER-JACKSON 
Emilie Jackson to Michael R. Fenster- 
macher '70, November 1972. Mike is an in- 
ventory management specialist for the U.S. 
Army Missile Command. / 1000 Airport 
Rd., Apt. 26, Huntsville, Ala. 35802. 
BOHLENDER-WAGENSE1L 
Eliese S. Wagenseil '74 to Hugh D. 
Bohlender, June 9, 1973. Her husband is a 
lieutenant in the United States Army. / 
6130 Young, Fort Bliss, Tex. 79906. 
FOLKOMER-SCHOLLENBERGER 
Be th Ann Schollenberger '72 to Timothy 



Folkomer, August 18, 1973. Beth earned 
her master's degree in education from West 
Chester State College and is teaching junior 
high science in Upper Darby. Her husband 
is a geology graduate of Franklin & 
Marshall College. / 165 Reese Rd., 
Springfield. Pa. 19064. 

HALLIBURTON-LOVGREN 

Wendy M. Lovgren '72 to Stephen 
Halliburton. November 10. 1973, Union 
Hill Presbyterian Church, Denville, N.J. 
Beth Huffman '73 served as organist. Mr. 
Halliburton attended Lehigh University 
and is working on his Ph.D. dissertation in 
information science while with Haverly 
Systems, Inc., a computer software com- 
pany. / 73 Chestnut Terr., Rockaway, N.J. 
07866. 

VALENTINE-BRADWAY 

Patricia J. Bradway '66 to Douglas M. 
Valentine. December 29, 1973, First 
Presbyterian Church, Newport News, Va. 
Patricia formerly taught in Charlottesville. 
Mr. Valentine is comptroller for the 
Charlottesville Redevelopment and 
Housing Authority. 

THEM-MUNROE 

Linda J, Munroe '73 to William W. 
Them '72. April 6. 1974. Katherine 
Glenney Fleming '74 was a bridesmaid. Bill 
is in partnership with his grandfather, own- 
ing and operating Jackson Realty and 
Mobile Homes, Inc. / R.D. 2, Route 6, 
Wysox, Pa. 18854. 

MOYER-SCAIFE 

Laura E. Scaife '68 to the Rev. Paul R. 
Moyer, May 11, 1974. Laura teaches 12th 
grade English at Williamsport and her hus- 
band is associate pastor of Covenant- 
Central Presbyterian Church. Both are in- 
volved in community work with juveniles, 
drugs, counseling and other activities. /414 
Brandon Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 
PAYNE-SALDUKAS 

Linda G.A. Saldukas '73 to Waller J. 
Payne '73, May 25, 1974. Linda is a chemist 
in organic research at Merck & Co., 
Rahway. Walter teaches earth science in 
Westfield. / Apt. 1-A, 1909 Church St., 
Rahway, N.J. 07065. 

REHR1G-BOLTON 

Doreen K Bolton '72 to Dennis T. 
Rehrig, May 25, 1974, St. John's Lutheran 
Towamensing Church. Palmerton, Pa. 
Doreen received her M.S. in mathematical 
sciences from Clemson University and is an 
operations research analyst in the cor- 
porate research department of 
Montgomery Ward, Chicago. / 606 
Preston Dr., Apt. 316, Bolingbrook, 111. 
60439. 

LINDER-SEDLER 

Alice C. Sedler to Richard E. Linder '65. 
April 13. 1974. Mrs. Sedler is a graduate of 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Allegheny College and received her 
master's in social work from Smith 
College. Rich is a stockbroker with Paine, 
Webber, Jackson & Curtis, Inc., 
Philadelphia. / Ardmore Commons No. 5, 
116 Ardmore Ave., Ardmore, Pa. 19003. 
ROBBINS-CHERRINGTON 

Karen A. Cherrington '74 to David Rob- 
bins, May 25, 1974, Roaringcreek Quaker 
Meeting House, Catawissa, Pa. Karen 
Parker '75 was maid of honor. Mr. Rob- 
bins, a graduate of Bucknell University in 
Japanese studies and international 
relations, is studying law at George 
Washington University. / 4065 S. Four 
Mile Run Dr., Apt. 101, Arlington, Va. 
22204. 

CONANT-KRYVORUKA 

Karen Ann Kryvoruka to R. Scott Co- 
nant '72. June 1, 1974, St. Joseph's Church, 
Hammonton, N.J. Diane Farringlon 
Macia '71 and Gary Macia '71 were 
members of the wedding party. Mrs. Co- 
nant is a graduate of Douglass College of 
Rutgers University. Scott is with Liberty 
Mutual Insurance Co. / 211 Carlton Club 
Dr., Piscataway, N.J. 08854. 

HULLINGS-MILLER 

Kathryn Ann Miller '76 to David W. 
Hullings '75. June 8, 1974, St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church, Mount Holly, N.J. 
Douglas Miller 77 and Peter Miller 77 
were ushers. / 201 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove, 
17870. 

McAFEE-WEANT 

Cheryl E. Weanl '74 to Patrick M. 
McAfee '74. June 8, 1974, St. John's 
Lutheran Church, Baltimore, Md. Michael 
Fina '74 was best man. Robert J arjisian '75. 
Edward Schaeberle '75 and Craig Bingman 
'75 were ushers. / 607 Clay St., Apt. 3, 
Blacksburg, Va. 24060. 

NANOS-BEIDER 

Laura Beider to H Gerald Nanos '70. 
June 20. 1974, Judge's Chambers, 
Englewood, N.J. Gerry is a mortgage 
broker for Strouse, Greenberg Financial 
Corp., Philadelphia. / 1926 Linden Hill 
Apts., Lindenwold, N.J. 08021 
GIFT-BEIDLER 

Susan M. Beidler to Kenneth C. Gift '74, 
July 14, 1974, / R.D. 3, Boyertown. Pa. 
19512. 

BRUBAKER-SIMMERMON 

Anne Simmermon to Stephen K. 
Brubaker '74. July 20, 1974. / 823 Chestnut 
St., Lebanon, Pa. 17042. 

FLINDT-WOOLBERT 

Linda R. Woolbert '68 to Walter E. 
Flindt. July 20, 1974, St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church, Shavertown, Pa. Gail Woolbert 
White '58 and Dr. James White '58 were in 
the wedding party. Linda was assistant 
editor of Focus magazine, Philadelphia's 
business weekly. Mr. Flindt, a graduate of 



Pennsylvania State and Drexel universities, 
is a design engineer with Crown Cork & 
Seal Corp., Philadelphia. / Society Hill 
Towers, 200 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
19106. 

KETURAKIS-SANOCKI 

Joan A. Sanocki to PaulJ. Kelurakis '71 . 
July 20, 1974, St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church, Reading, Pa. Mrs. Keturakis 
attended McCann's School of Business and 
is with the National Central Bank. Paul 
received his teaching certificate from 
Alvernia College and is teaching in 
Reading. / 1 2 1 3 Chestnut St., Reading, Pa. 
19602. 

WOODS-ALWINE 

Gail Y. Alwine '72 to Robert A. Woods, 
July 20, 1974, St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 
Biglerville, Pa. Susan Wright '72 was an 
attendant. Gail has done graduate work at 
Choppin State College and is teaching in 
Baltimore where her husband, a graduate of 
Edinboro State College, also teaches. / 
7235 Holabird Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21222. 

KNIPEL-MILLER 

Susan M. Miller to Daniel E. Knipel '74. 
July 27, 1974, Locust Grove United Church 
of Christ, York, Pa. Lonnie Campbell '74 
was an usher. The bride, a graduate of West 
Chester State College, teaches music in 
Upper Darby. / 1304 Oak Lane Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19126. 

EDWARDS-SMITH 

Cathy Ann Smith to Richard L. Edwards 
"74. August 3, 1974, Grace E.C. Church, 
Locustdale, Pa. Perrin Hamilton '74 and 
Leroy Diehl '75 were attendants. Mrs. 
Edwards is with Citizens' National Bank, 
Ashland, Pa. 

HARVEY-STALHAMMER 

Elissa Slalhammer '74 to Raymond N. 
Harvey, August 3, 1974, Pleasantville 
(N.Y.) Presbyterian Church. The groom, a 
graduate of Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College, is with Penn Appliance 
Distributors, Harrisburg. He is a veteran of 
U.S. Army service in Vietnam. / 5 
Talisman Bldg., Briarcrest Gardens, 
Hershey, Pa. 17033. 

MEYER-HESS 

Sara L. Hess '74 to Karl J. Meyer '72. 
August 3, 1974, Christ Church, Summit, 
N.J. Douglas Webb '73 and Kenneth 
Free/and '72 were in the wedding party. 
Karl is affiliated with John Wanamaker's 
in Harrisburg. / Box 7878, R.D. 1, Grant- 
ville. Pa. 17028. 

COOPER-RYAN 

Deborah H. Ryan to Alan H. Cooper 
'69. August 10, 1974, St. John's Episcopal 
Church, Essex, Ct. Mrs. Cooper, a 
graduate of Wilson College, is teaching in 
St. Clairsville, Ohio. Al received master's 
degrees from SUNY at Binghamton and 



Bryn Mawr College. He teaches French, 
Latin and archaeology at Linsley Military 
Institute, Wheeling, W.Va. 

FISHER-MORRISON 

Susan Morrison to Henry R. Fisher '73. 
August 10, 1974. Mrs. Fisher is an English 
graduate of Albright College. Henry 
earned the M.B.A. from the University of 
Pittsburgh and is a staff accountant for 
Price Waterhouse & Co., Philadelphia. / 
R.D. 2, Box 180A, Medford, N.J. 08055. 
GOETZ-SLATTERY 

Jill H. Slattery '74 to David O. Goetz '74, 
August 10, 1974. / 120 N. Main St., 
Nazareth, Pa. 18064. 

STRAUS-OLIVER 

Nancy Lee Oliver '68 to Laurence M. 
Straus, August 15, 1974, Philadelphia. 
Nancy is a social worker at Philadelphia 
General Hospital and working toward the 
M.S.W. at the University of Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Straus, a graduate of the University of 
Nebraska, is a vocational and rehabilita- 
tion counselor with the Bureau of the 
Visually Handicapped in Philadelphia. / 
901 Clinton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. 
WALTER-LUPOLT 

Cynthia K. Lupolt '74 to Ralph M. 
Walter Jr., August 17, 1974, Emmanuel 
Lutheran Church, Middleburg, Pa. Cindy 
is the daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Wayne 
Lupolt '52. The groom graduated from 
Williamsport Area Community College 
and is with Faylor-Middlecreek, Inc., Win- 
field. / R.D. 1, Middleburg, Pa. 17842. 
WEEKS-MANSIR 

Deborah Ann Mansir '75 to Hendryk S 
Weeks Jr. '74. August 17, 1974, East 
Hampton (N.Y.) Presbyterian Church. 
Deborah Mathias '75. Cheryl Bishop '74 
and Janice Friedman '75 were attendants. 
Deborah is majoring in psychology. / R.D. 
3, Box 283, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 
APPLE-SCHOLL 

Brenda J Scholl '76 to Roger D. Apple, 
August 24, 1974, Grace Baptist Church, 
Mount Pleasant Mills, Pa. The groom is a 
graduate of Penn State University and 
teaches vocational agriculture at the AVTS 
of Williamsport Area Community College. 
/ Allenwood, Pa. 17810. 

MORRIS-CROMIS 

Cynthia Kay Cromis XaJohn W . Morris 
'74. August 24, 1974, Memorial United 
Church of Christ, York, Pa. Stephen 
Brubaker '74 and Stephen Mohr '74 were 
ushers. Mrs. Morris graduated from 
Juniata College and attended the Universi- 
ty of Barcelona in Spain. 

VESSEY-GRANT 

Lynn R. Grant '73 to Bruce A. Vessey 
'74, August 24, 1974. Lynn teaches 7th 
grade mathematics in Mendham, N.J. / 
J0791, 3901 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 19174. 



WINTER 1975 



21 










A snowy Saturday in January — students entering the Campus 
Center with Heilman Music Hall in the background. It was 
January 18. and about half of the 140 high school musicians 
taking part in the Central-Central Western District Orchestra 



Festival, being held on the Susquehanna campus, were stranded 
in Selinsgrove an extra night when their parents were unable 
to travel from distant points. The music faculty's David 
Bolt: '58 and John Zurfluh Jr. served as co-host I conductors. 



WINTER-HOLMES 
Judith A. Holmes x'73 to Jeffrey W. 
Winter '72. August 24, 1974, English 
Congregational Church, Lansford, Pa. Jeff 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Winter 
'48. Bradford Ritchie x'74. David Dunn '72 
and Douglas Griese '73 were in the wedding 
party. Steven '72 and Jane Fankhauser 
Josephs '72 served as flutist and vocalist. 
Judy graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing 
and is an R.N. at Beverly Hospital. Jeff is a 
first-year student at Gordon-Conwell 
Seminary in the M.Div. program. / 104 
Elliott St., Beverly, Mass. 01915. 
MICHETTI-TROUTMAN 
Ruby M. Troutman to Joseph C. 
Michetli Jr. 76, August 31, 1974, St. 
Michael's Lutheran Church, Klingerstown, 
Pa. Mrs. Michetti is a secretary for 
Brubaker Tool Corp., Millersburg. / R.D., 
Herndon, Pa. 17830. 

ARNOLD-BROPHY 

Louise I. Brophy '72 to Robert Arnold, 

September 14, 1974, St. Peter's Lutheran 

Church, Allentown, Pa. Jill Styger 

Weekley '71 and Gail Fullman '72 were 



attendants. Charles Brophy '70 and 
Kenneth Havanko, part-time percussion in- 
structor at Susquehanna, were ushers. 
Louise is a teller in the Allentown branch of 
First Federal Savings of Philadelphia. Her 
husband is a piano technician. / South 
Third St., Emmaus, Pa. 18049. 
MOHR-REIFSNYDER 

Deborah G. Reifsnyder '73 to Stephen B. 
Mohr '74, September 14, 1974, North 
Heidelberg Church, Robesonia, Pa. 
Deborah is the daughter of Norman and 
Nancy Griesemer Reifsnyder '42. Nan 
Havens Wrisley '73 and Wendy Mohr 
Lewis '72 were members of the wedding 
party. The bride is with Commerical Credit 
Corp. in Reading. / 2415 Academy Rd., 
Holmes, Pa. 19043. 

FENNIKOH-BUEHLER 

Karen Jo-Anne Buehler '73 to Frederick 
W. Fennikoh, September 21, 1974, Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Tenafly, N.J. Marilyn 
Lacko Stevens '73 and Diane Parton '73 
were in the wedding. Mr. Fennikoh is a 
graduate of Delaware Valley College and 
both bride and groom are with the Institute 
of Environmental Medicine of the New 



York University Medical Center. / Box 
1 19, R.D. 1, Tuxedo Park, N.Y. 10987. 

PELAK-HESSE 
Linda E. Hesse '73 to Daniel A. Pelak. 
September 22, 1974, Our Savior Lutheran 
Church, Fair Lawn, N.J. Carol Dickinson 
'73 was a bridesmaid. Pamela Shay 
Eickhoff'73 was a soloist and Susan Topfer 
'73 was flutist. Linda is a staff accountant 
with Haskins & Sells, New York City, and 
her husband, a graduate of Penn State 
University, is a medical services represen- 
tative for Parke-Davis Division of Warner 
Lambert. / 90 Gaynor Place. Glen Rock, 
N.J. 07452. 

PIATT-HUBBERT 

Bonnie Lee Hubbert to Charles R. Piatt 
III '72, September 28, 1974, First United 
Methodist Church, Carlisle, Pa. William 
Henschke II '72 and David Salvitti '72 were 
attendants. Mrs. Piatt, a graduate of 
Millersville State College, taught in Car- 
lisle prior to her marriage. Charles is 
associated with Roadway Express. / 802-B 
Indiana Creek Dr.. Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
18703. 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



McCARD-THOMAS 

Joanne Lee Thomas '74 to William H. 
McCard '74, October 5, 1974, Ascension 
Lutheran Church, Deer Park, N.Y. 
Marilyn Blend '74, Margaret Shaw '74, 
Jeanne Kauffman '74, Marion Hilsher '75, 
John Guthrie '74, James McClatchy '74 
and James Letts '74 were attendants. 
Christine Schmidt '74 was the soloist. / 
1970 New Rodgers Rd., Apt. G-6, Levit- 
town. Pa. 19056. 

STINSMAN-KLEINFELTER 

Judith Ann Kleinfelter '74 to Robert A. 
Stinsman '76, October 5, 1974, Horn 
Meditation Chapel, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity. Chaplain Edgar Brown performed the 
marriage ceremony. / 206 N. Market St.. 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

WEAVER-EVERHART 

Sharon Lynn Everhart '74 to Thomas M. 
Weaver, October 5, 1974, Lazarus 
Lutheran Church, Lineboro, Pa. Deborah 
Quinn '74. Vicki Rohm '74 and Virginia 
Strand '74 were bridesmaids. Mr. Weaver 
is an environmental control specialist for 
Asplundh Tree Expert Co. / 4509 Arthur 
Shipley Rd., Sykesville, Md. 21784. 
BAXTER-DOWLING 

Evelyn M. Dowling '74 to Daniel M. 
Baxter '74, October 12, 1974. / P.O. Box 
266, Fishkill, N.Y. 12524. 

MAGGI-RICE 

Janet E. Rice '74 to Gary S. Maggi '74, 
October 12, 1974, Darien, Conn. Sus- 
quehanna Chaplain Edgar Brown officiated 
at the wedding. / 52 E. Lancaster Ave., 
Ardmore, Pa. 19003. 

THOMAS-TURNER 

Judith E. Turner '74 to William H. 
Thomas '74, October 19, 1974, Middletown 
Presbyterian Church, Media, Pa. Grace 
Welton '74, Keith Sterling '74 and Richard 
Frank '72 were in the wedding party. / 1004 
Jaques Ave., Rahway, N.J. 07065. 
SMITH-FINAN 

Nancy L. Finan '71 to Rodger L. Smith, 
October 20, 1974, Grace Lutheran Church, 
Perth Amboy, N.J. The Rev. David G. 
Volk '52 officiated. Mary Hanlen Mayer 
'71 and Carol Bring man '71 were atten- 
dants. Nancy is with the National State 
Bank at Fords. Mr. Smith, who served with 
the U.S. Navy, is a member of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers Local 358. / 34 Louis St., Fords, 
N.J. 08863. 

DELIN-CREEDON 

Judith Creedon to Peter W. Delin '69, 
October 26, 1974, Wilmington, Del. Peter 
is with Lee, The Image Changer. / Forest 
Creek Apts., 4503 Apple Lane, West Dept- 
ford, N.J. 08066. 

NAGY-GILLESPIE 

Priscilla E. Gillespie '72 to Dennis J. 
Nagy, October 26, 1974, First Lutheran 



WINTER 1975 



Church, Kearny, N.J. Mr. Nagy is a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley College and a 
research assistant for E.R. Squibb & Sons, 
New Brunswick. / 18A Garden View Terr., 
Hightstown, N.J. 08520. 

STRAWOET-WHITE 

Karen L. While '74 to John A. Strawoet 
'71. October 26, 1974, Presbyterian Church 
of Pleasantville, N.Y. John earned the 
master's degree from Lehigh University 
and is a teacher in the Perkiomen Valley 
School District. / Apt. 5, 201 Davisville 
Rd., Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. 
MOYER-RISLOW 

Kathryn Rislow to Carl M. Mover '61, 
November 2, 1974, Selinsgrove, Pa. Robert 
J. Summer III '61 was best man. Carl, 
former director of admissions at S.U., is 
assistant vice president of the Tri-County 
National Bank in Middleburg. / 203 W. 
Chestnut St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 
NOLTE-LUECK 

Sheryl D. Lueck to Paul A. Nolle '74. 
November 2, 1974. / 1 820 W. 46th St., Apt. 
313, Hialeah, Fla. 33012. 

CORBETT-BICKHART 

Donelta Dee Bickharl x'7l to James W. 
Corbett, November 3, 1974, Sharon 
Lutheran Church. Selinsgrove. The Rev. 
Celo Leitzel '45 performed the wedding 
ceremony. Donetta is an aide at the 
Selinsgrove State School and Hospital and 
her husband, a graduate of Penn State 
University, is a bartender in the Rendez- 
vous Inn, Milton. / 129 Chestnut St., Sun- 
bury. Pa. 17801. 

DUNCAN-DAVIS 

DebraJ . Davis '74 to Thomas A. Duncan 
'74. November 9, 1974. / 207 Maple St., 
Kearny, N.J. 07032. 

WRAY-GRAY 

Fay F. Gray to William A. Wray Jr. '75. 
November 19, 1974, Eberly's Mill Church 
of God, Camp Hill, Pa. Mrs. Wray is a 
graduate of Cumberland Perry Technical 
School. / Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 
GAMBLE-FINCH 

Helen A. Finch to Leslie B. Gamble Jr. 
'71, November 23, 1974, Concord United 
Methodist Church, Englewood, Ohio. Les 
is working toward his M.S. in recreation 
and parks specializing in camp and outdoor 
education at Penn State. 

WEYANT-DUBS 

DebraA. Dubs '74 to JarlR. Weyant '74. 
November 23, 1974, St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church, Hanover, Pa. Susquehannans in 
the wedding party were Wallace J. Lindsay 
'74. Debra Snyder '71. David Fettinger '74 
and David Wemple '74. Musicians were 
Rodger Williard '74. tenor; Susan Gordon 
'75, soprano; Donna Somerfield '74, violin; 
and Donna Zierdl Elkin '70, organ. / 1931 
Downsville Pike, Apt. 24, Hagerstown, 
Md. 21740. 



Born Crusaders 

To Lynn D. '71 and Dorothy Jones 
Zimmerman x'74. a daughter, Rebecca 
Ann, September 28, 1972. / R.D. 1, 
Tamaqua, Pa. 18252. 

To James and Jo Anne Woernle Dudley 
x'70, a son, Paul, February 1973. Mrs. 
Dudley is a church organist in Bedford. / 
804 Baltimore Ave., Bedford, Va. 24523. 

To Paul W. and Gail Spory McPherson 
'67, a daughter, Gretchen Sue, March 9, 
1 973. Gail is a free lance correspondent for 
The York Dispatch and York Daily 
Record, county information director for 
York County Farmers Association, and 
part-time secretary and advertising agent. / 
R.D. 1, New Park, Pa. 17352. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John A. Burton Jr. '71, 
a son, Jeremy John, April 4, 1973. Jack is 
accounting manager for Vitramon, Inc., an 
electronics manufacturing company in 
Monroe, Ct. / 100 E, North Turnpike Rd.. 
Wallingford, Ct. 06492. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Havas '68. a 
daughter. Jeanne Marie, May 31, 1973. 
John is associated with Shearer, Mette, 
Hoerner & Woodside, Attorneys at Law in 
Harrisburg. / 6310 Stephens Crossing, 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1975 

Spring Sports Schedules 

BASEBALL 



M26 

M29 

A9 

Al2 

A16 

Al9 

A23 

A26 

A30 

M3 

M7 

MIO 

Ml4 

Ml7 



A8 

AIO 

Al2 

Al4 

Al6 

Al9 

A22 

A24 

A26 

A28 

A30 

M2-3 

Ml3 



(All games are double headers) 
Dickinson 
Messiah 
Juniata 
Wilkes 
Scranton 
Delaware Valley 
Philadelphia Textile 
Elizabethtown 
Western Maryland 
Albright 
York 

Lock Haven State 
Bucknell 
Penn State Capitol Campus 

MEN'S TENNIS 

Kings 

Juniata 

Elizabethtown 

Dickinson 

Lycoming 

Wilkes 

Bloomsburg State 

Scranton 

Albright 

Upsala 

Delaware Valley 

MAC 

Bucknell 



A 
H 
A 
H 
A 
A 
A 
H 
H 
H 
H 
A 
A 
H 



A 
A 
H 
H 
A 
A 
A 
H 
H 
A 
H 
F 
H 



* 



To Stanley L. Jr. and Mary Jane 
McCrea Spencer '68. a daughter, Barbara 
Christie. November 30, 1973. Son Andrew 
Joseph was born October 6, 1972. Mary 
Jane is president of the Big Spring Area 
Junior Woman's Club, secretary of New- 
ville Civic Club, and a director of the New- 
ville Historical Society. She earned the 
M.S. in public administration from Ship- 
pensburg State. / Spencer Farms, R. D. 1, 
Box 41. Newville, Pa. 17241. 

To Brian A. '68 and Sandra Woolston 
Gross x'69. a daughter, Kelli Jean, 
December 15. 1973. Brian is vice president 
of R.G. Woolston Associates, Inc.. chair- 
man of the board of Shillington Manage- 
ment Corp.. and owner of Brodel's Hearth 
& Gift Shops of Reading, Lancaster and 
West Chester. / 35 Fairway. Rd„ Reading, 
Pa. 19607. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Van Deroef 
'67, a son. Geoffrey Christopher, March 29, 
1974. Roger is a research assistant at the 
Institute of Microbiology. Rutgers Univer- 
sity. / 206 S. Martine Ave., Fanwood, N.J. 
07023. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David W. Madison '71 , 
a daughter, Jennifer Lynn, April 6. 1974. 
Dave is manager of the Georgia Division of 
Union Products, Inc. / 81 Twiggs Corner, 
Peachtree City, Ga. 30269. 



u 






* 


k 


WOMEN'S TENNIS 


A 10 


Millersville State 




A 


A15 


WMkes 




H 


A17 


Bloomsburg State 




H 


A21 


Dickinson 




A 


A24 


Juniata 




A 


A28 


Lock Haven State 




H 


Ml 


Elizabethtown 




H 


M5 


Bucknell 




H 


M8 


Shippensburg State 
TRACK 




A 


A9 


Dickinson 




H 


A12 


Bloomsburg State 




H 


A19 


Lycoming 




A 


A22 


Juniata 




A 


A24 


Delaware Valley & Alb 


right 


DV 


A30 


Gettysburg 




A 


M2-3 


MAC 




Dickinson 


M6 


Bucknell 




H 


MIS 


York 

GOLF 




A 


A8 


Lycoming 




A 


A10 


Dickinson 




A 


A 14 


Upsala 




H 


A 17 


Bloomsburg State 




A 


\:i 


Juniata 




H 


a:: 


Bucknell 




A 


■\24 


Scranton 




H 


A28 


M u 


Delaware Valley 


Ml 


Elizabethtown 




H 


M5 


Wilkes 




H 


M9 


(ietusburg 




A 


MI2 


York 




A 



To the Rev. and Mrs. Donald B. Green 
'71, a daughter, Angela Marie, April 18. 
1974. Don is pastor of St. John Lutheran 
Church. Hummelstown and Zion 
Lutheran, Union Deposit. / 3 W. Main St., 
Hershey. Pa. 17033. 

To Brian and Barbara Pont: Tolbert 
x'6l. twin daughters, Alexis and Laura. 
April 2 1 , 1 974. There are two brothers, Eric 
and Matthew. Mr. Tolbert owns and 
operates a commercial-industrial 
photography studio. Barbara holds the B.S. 
in nursing from Columbia University 
School of Nursing. / 942 Salisbury Ct., 
Lancaster, Pa. 17601. 

To the Rev. Jesse H. Ill and C. Lenore 
Knupp Barton '68, their first child, a 
daughter, Heidi Ruth. June 11, 1974. 
Father is minister of the Picture Rocks 
Charge of the United Methodist Church. / 
Box 366, Picture Rocks, Pa. 17762. 

To Lawrence J. '65 and Patricia Craig 
Galley '67, their second son, Todd Garret, 
July 2, 1974. Patricia does accounting at 
home and Larry is vice president of Shore 
Tire Co. He and his partner have just built 
and opened a new place of business in 
Bricktown, N.J. / 90 New St., South River. 
N.J. 08882. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Livernois, 
their second daughter, Renee Elise. through 
adoption, July 17, 1974. Renee was born 
July 14, 1974 and sister Laura is 5. Dr. 
Livernois is assistant professor of religion 
at S.U. / 207 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hummel Jr. 
'70. their first child, a son, Christopher 
Ryan. August 8, 1 974. John is a caseworker 
for McKean County Board of Assistance. / 
31 Onofrio St.. Bradford, Pa. 16701. 

To John P. and Sherry Inch Hunt '71 , 
their second child, a daughter, Jennifer 
Michelle, August 1 3, 1974. / 439 N. Second 
St.. Sunbury. Pa. 17801. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John P. While 76. their 
second son. Jason Michael, August 22, 
1974. / 120 N. High St., Selinsgrove. Pa. 
17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Slauffer '66. 
their third child, a son, Kirk Samuel, 
August 28, 1974. Sam is a teacher in the 
Mid-West School District and also boys' 
head basketball coach. 

To Gary G. '65 and Joan Hoffman Zerbe 
'67. their second child, a daughter. Heather 
Michele, August 28, 1974. Brother David 
was 5 years old on July 9, 1974. Gary is vice 
president of Pan American Group Homes, 
Inc., Trappe, Pa„ which has developed and 
operates 15 community residential homes 
and apartments for mentally retarded 
citizens. / 417 Laurelwood Dr., Douglass- 
ville. Pa. 19518. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Larry A. Giesmann '66. 
their first child, a son, David Reinhardt. 



August 30, 1974. Larry is assistant 
professor of biological sciences at Northern 
Kentucky State College, where he also 
coaches the wrestling team. / R.R. 2. Box 
111, California. Ky. 41007. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Phillip G. Buchanan 
'70. their first child, a son, Nathan Samuel, 
September 6, 1974. Phil is a member of the 
faculty at Penn State University, Capitol 
Campus in Middletown. / R.D. 3, Box 348 
AA, Hummelstown, Pa. 17036. 

To Lloyd H. '70 and Joan Vondercrone 
Ross '68. their second child, a son, Jeffrey 
David, September 9, 1974. Lloyd is band 
director at Newark H.S. / 120 Kenmark 
Rd.. Todd Estates, Newark, Del. 19711. 

To Ignacy and Dr. Mary Lou Ernst 
Fonberg '58. their first child, a daughter, 
Margaret Sandra. September 11, 1974. 
Louie, daughter of veteran Alumni Office 
secretary Margaret "Peg" Ernst, is assis- 
tant professor of biology at Yale University 
and her husband is a computer consultant. / 
600 Orange St., New Haven. Conn. 065 1 1 . 

To Francis P. and Priscilla Reade 
.Xewbert x'70. their first child, a daughter, 
Priscilla Alden, September 18, 1974. / 6505 
Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia. Pa. 19135. 

To Frederick C. and Carolyn Robinson 
Landis '65. their first child, a son, Ross 
Frederick. September 19, 1974. / 1100 
William St., Apt. 613. Fredericksburg, Va. 
22401. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Daniel R Seyss '65. 
their second son. Thomas. September 19, 
1974. Brother Theodore Daniel was born 
September 13, 1972. Dan is a textile 
designer with Deering Milliken. Inc., New 
York City, and is involved with menswear 
marketing and sales. / 1 13 Ford Rd., Den- 
ville, N.J. 07834. 

To Barry R. '68 and Denise Horton 
Jackson '68. their second daughter. 
Bethany Dawn, September 27. 1974. 
Barry's new position is with Fidelity 
Mutual Life. Philadelphia, as an invest- 
ment officer. / 264 Valley View Rd., 
Springfield (Delaware County). Pa. 19064. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Palm '71. 
their second daughter, Kimberly Ann. Oc- 
tober 1, 1974. Linda Cheri was born 
September 10, 1972. Don is an agent for the 
Internal Revenue Service in Williamsport. 
/ R.D. 2, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Book '69. a 
son, October 1. 1974. / 23 Woodmere 
Building. Village of Pineford, Middletown, 
Pa. 17057. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. King '66. 
their second child, a daughter. Karen Lee. 
October 2. 1974. Don is a history teacher 
with the Montoursville Area School 
District, coaches varsity tennis and is super- 
visor of detention. / 604 Montour St.. 
Montoursville. Pa. 17754. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Rehearsing a scene from Mozart's "Cosifan tulle" for the Music Department's 
Opera Workshop are Steven Hinks '78 of Johnstown. Pa. as Ferrando. Ronald 
Lennen '76 of.Easton. Pa. as Don Alfonso, and Susan Gordon '75. also of 
Johnstown, as Dorabella. The workshop, scheduled for February 2 in Weber 
Chapel Auditorium, was billed as "Four Comedies of Love" and also included scenes 
from Mozart's "Don Giovanni." Verdi's " Falsi aff." and Flolow's "Martha." 
It was directed by Harriet Couch, a first-year music instructor at Susquehanna. 



deaths 



Florence Smith Patterson '07 (Mrs. 
Walter), East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

William E. Schlegel '34, Herndon, Pa., 
December 11, 1971. He taught in 
Northumberland for almost 40 years before 
retiring with physical disabilities. 

Ruth Albert Baer x'25, Norwood, Pa., 
May 16, 1974. She was the widow of the late 
Rev. Dr. Dallas C. Baer '23. 

Lewis Kline Rich x '32. Northumberland, 
Pa., June 30, 1974. He owned and operated 
the Rich Oil Co. Inc. 

William M. Duncan '27 . Upper Darby, 
Pa., August 10, 1974. Holder of a master's 
degree from Temple University, he was a 
teacher and administrator in Hanover, 
McAlisterville and Honey Brook, Pa. and 
was associate superintendent of Philadel- 
phia schools at the time of his retirement. 

Russell Glace '28. Selinsgrove, Pa., 
August 24, 1974. A former science teacher, 
he was active in the automobile and service 
station business until retirement in 1971. 
His sister is Florence Glace Romberger '25. 

Max A. Blair, McAlisterville, Septem- 



ber 1, 1974. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
■Max S. Blair '36 and nephew of Glenn Blair 
x'36. 

Charles W. Ritter, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
August 31, 1974. He was a member of 
Susquehanna's Advisory Council, Crusa- 
der Quarterback Club, and generous bene- 
factor of the University. The Rev. Celo W. 
Leitzel '45 officiated at the funeral. 

The Rev. Dr. Norman S. Wolf he 25, 
Gettysburg, Pa. summer 1974. He 
graduated from Gettysburg College in 1904 
and from the seminary at Gettysburg in 
1907. Pastor of St. Matthew Lutheran 
Church, Bloomsburg, and later of Zion 
Lutheran Church, Fairfield, he retired in 
1953. 

Dr. Chester W. Todd '29. Montoursville, 
Pa., September 6, 1974. A graduate of 
Wooster College and Princeton Seminary, 
he received his B.D. from Susquehanna, 
S.T.M. from the Lutheran Seminary of 
Chicago, and S.T.D. from Temple Univer- 
sity. He served Presbyterian churches in 
Mt. Union, Sunbury, and Coudersport, Pa. 
and was stated clerk for the Northumber- 
land Presbytery for 25 years. 

Dr. Waller E. '27 and Clare Fisher 
Reifsnyder x'14. Rehoboth Beach, Del., 
both fall 1974. Dr. Reifsnyder earned the 



B.D. from the Theological Seminary of the 
Reformed Church in the U.S. and the 
Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. 
He served in the Signal Corps during World 
War I and in the Chaplains Corps in World 
War II. He was chaplain of Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospitals at Marion, Ind. and 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Andrew N. Grover '68. Camden, Me. 
September 13, 1974. Andy taught English 
and general business at H.B. Lawrence 
School, Holyoke, Mass., did graduate 
work in the Columbia University School of 
Library Service and was writing a book. 

Helen G. Fisher '13. Redondo Beach, 
Cal., September 23, 1974. She held an 
M.A. from Columbia University and 
taught for many years in Idaho, Hawaii and 
California. A sister, Dr. Lillian E. Fisher 
'12. survives. 

The Rev. Dr. John B. Kniseley '13. Glen- 
dale Calif., September 25, 1974. Besides 
the B.A., he also held the M.A., B.D. and 
D.D. degrees from Susquehanna. Heserved 
Lutheran congregations in Port Royal, 
DuBois, Northumberland and Pittsburgh, 
Pa. and in 1959 went to Glendale where he 
became associated with his son, the Rev. 
Dr. Karl E. Kniseley '38. senior pastor of 
First Lutheran Church. He was named 
associate pastor emeritus for life in 1970. 
Dr. Kniseley on his 50th anniversary and 
Karl on his 25th conducted the church ser- 
vice at the S.U. Alumni Weekend. The 
elder Kniseley was a past president of the 
University's Alumni Association and past 
member of the Board of Directors. His 
wife, the former Mary Mae Graybill '13. 
and a son, Paul Kniseley x'43. preceded him 
in death. Karl's wife is the former Margaret 
Dunkle x'41. 

John W. Kiracofe, Carlisle, Pa., 
September 28, 1974. He was the brother of 
Clifford A. Kiracofe '30. 

Pearl I. Kawel '27. Sunbury, Pa., Oc- 
tober 14, 1974. A school teacher for 40 
years, she received the bachelor's degree 
from Bucknell University and the M.A. 
from Susquehanna. 

Miles S. McLain '27. New Berlin, Pa., 
October 17, 1974. Retired for the past 15 
years, he taught at high schools in Penn- 
sylvania and New York and was super- 
vising principal of the S.S. Seward 
Institute, Florida, N.Y. He was a member 
of First Presbyterian Church and numerous 
organizations. Among his survivors are his 
wife, the former Harriet Dietrich x'27; 
brother Dr. Joseph C. McLain '24. married 
to the former Mabel Mumma '24; sister 
Sarahx, widow of the Rev. WE. Watls'17, 
and sister Leah x'30. wife of Stewart Car- 
son x'30. The Rev. Robert Kerchoff58 of- 
ficiated at services. 

Mary K. Potleiger '24. Selinsgrove, Pa., 



WINTER 1975 



25 



Jobs For Alumni 



EACH YEAR 80 to 82 percent of Susquehanna's seniors file 
applications with the University Placement Service which they hope 
will help them find suitable positions upon graduation. Under the very 
able direction of Frances MacCuish since 1966, the Placement Office 
has gained a sound reputation. Five years ago the number of recruiters 
visiting Susquehanna to talk with seniors reached a peak figure of 127, 
including 85 representatives from business, 38 from schools, and 4 from 
the military. While in some cases the degree of help is indirect or sup- 
portive, rather than direct, 76 percent of those applicants were placed. 

Current unemployment problems have reached up into the 
educated, as well as the labor groups, blue-collar and white-collar 
groups. Last year, only 52 recruiters showed up to talk with Susquehan- 
na seniors and, at this point, it appears that the total this spring will not 
exceed 35. Jobs are scarce — especially for teachers. A dramatic excep- 
tion in this field is music, where Bill Roberts '29 of the music faculty, 
working with the Placement Office, has in recent years done yeoman 
service in helping to place 100 percent of the music ed graduates. 

Two nationwide surveys announce that major corporations will 
hire about the same number to somewhat fewer college graduates this 
year than they did last year — when placement was slightly down at 
Susquehanna. The outlook for engineers is characterized as "bright," 
for those headed for accounting or other financial-type positions, "fair- 
ly good." Prospects for graduates in most other disciplines are 
described as "slim." 

All alumni who may be contemplating hiring personnel, or are 
familiar with job opportunities anywhere, are urged to contact Mrs. 
MacCuish at the University. You can be of great help to your Alma 
Mater and its seniors — 37 majoring in business, 22 in accounting, 26 in 
music education, 37 seeking other teaching posts, 141 in liberal arts. 

Alumni, too, are welcome to file applications with Susquehanna's 
Placement Office. They are also being placed, and the number of alum- 
ni registrants has doubled in the past year. 



October 27, 1974. Much-loved piano 
teacher at Susquehanna for 42 years, she 
retired with emeritus status in 1967. Miss 
Potteiger had studied piano pedagogy un- 
der Leopold Poldosky and also done 
graduate work at New York University. 
She was active in professional organiza- 
tions and Sigma Alpha Iota as well as the 
University's Women's Auxiliary and 
Sharon Lutheran Church. Among her sur- 
vivors are sisters Mildred Potleiger '29 and 
Helen Potteiger Oberdorf, a member of 
Susquehanna's library staff, and sister-in- 
law Marion Mover Potleiger 77, widow of 



Dr. Robert J. Potteiger x'18. She was a 
sister of three previously-deceased alum- 
ni — Anna L. Potteiger '12. Albert R. 
Potteiger '20. and Jack Potleiger x'29. 

Amy A. Swab '24. Elizabethville, Pa., 
November 6. 1974. Also a graduate of the 
Peirce School of Business Administration, 
she was a registered representative in in- 
vestments. She was a member of St. John's 
Lutheran Church, Berrysburg. 

Dr. George S. Mover '22, Freeburg, Pa., 
November 14, 1974. A graduate of the 
Eastman School of Business, he earned the 
M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from 



the University of Pennsylvania, and the 
B.D. from Duke University. He headed 
economics departments successively at the 
University of Louisville, Lenoir Rhyne 
College, and Catawba College. He was a 
life-long member of Freeburg United 
Church of Christ and active in many civic 
organizations, and was a decorated U.S. 
Army veteran of World War II. 

William S. Shipman, Sunbury, Pa., 
November 17, 1974. He was the father of 
the Rev. W. Stevens Shipman '69. 

Dr. Francis R Geigle '33, DeKalb, 111., 
November 15, 1974. He earned the M.A. 
and Ed.D. from New York University and 
held an honorary doctor of humanities 
degree from Lycoming College, from which 
he graduated when it was Dickinson Junior 
College. He taught at Lycoming and 
Montclair State College, was a New Jersey 
banker, and began a distinguished 
educational administrative career at 
Northern Illinois University in 1951. He 
retired last year after having served as 
acting president and then vice president for 
development and alumni relations. He was 
a brother of Dr. Ralph C. Geigle '35. 

Carrie Zimmerman Klase (Mrs. 
Franklin), Sunbury, Pa., November 22, 
1974. She was the mother of Patricia A. 
Klase x'59. 

Stanford C. Sholley, Lewisburg. Pa., 
November 22, 1974. He was the father of 
Dr. Stanford C. Sholley Jr. '62 and Sandra 
K. Sholley 63. 

Edna M. Rowe '33. Mount Carmel, Pa., 
November 27, 1974. A retired elementary 
and high school teacher, she was a member 
of St. Paul's United Methodist Church and 
past president of the Northumberland 
County Federation of Women's Club. 

Wilbur E. Bennage '15. Lewisburg, Pa., 
November 29, 1974. A World War I 
veteran, he became a teacher in Columbia, 
Pa., and was a correctional officer in the 
U.S. Penitentiary at Lewisburg until retire- 
ment. He was a member of Christ's 
Lutheran Church. 

Pierce A. Coryell '43. Selinsgrove, Pa., 
January 6, 1975. An Army veteran of 
World War II. he earned his law degree 
from the University of Michigan Law 
School and practiced from his home, the 
Governor Snyder mansion on Market 
Street. Borough solicitor for 22 years and a 
leader in many civic enterprises, he also was 
an active historian and writer. For the past 
four years he authored anonymously the 
highly witty "Along the Trail," a weekly 
column published in The Selinsgrove 
Times-Tribune. He was a member of 
Sharon Lutheran Church. A nephew is 
David A. Coryell '73. married to the former 
Susan Hancock '72. 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



A Letter 
From Taiwan 



£ 









LAST SUMMER Dr. Neil H. Potter, associate 
professor of chemistry, his wife and four children were 
consecrated as missionaries at the Central Pennsylva- 
nia Conference, United Church of Christ, held at Sus- 
quehanna University. On sabbatical leave, Dr. Potter is 
teaching this year at Tunghai University in Taichung, 
Taiwan, which is supported by several Protestant 
denominations. He recently sent along this picture of 
the family, "taken at Changhua, about 15 miles from 
Taichung. The Buddha is claimed to be the largest in 
southeast Asia." 

He writes an interesting letter. Here are a few ex- 
cerpts — 

"We feel we have survived the first few months of 
'culture shock' and now can take most things in our 
stride. We are fortunate in having in our maid a very 
good cook and thoroughly enjoy Chinese food six 
nights a week, but everyone looks forward to our 
bimonthly trips to the Navy snackbar for good old 
hamburgers. Mary has enjoyed her vacation from 
household chores, but has been doing other things in- 
stead. She has been taking Chinese language lessons 
since August which we realize is a necessity for at least 
one member of the household. . . . In addition she is the 
secretary for Dean Kao in the Environmental Institute 
and does a lot of typing for Western professors in 
general. In between stencils and lessons she practices 
karate and is now the proud owner of a 'yellow belt.' 

"The children have adjusted remarkably well. 
Amy and Andy enjoy their school despite the fact that 
they must ride in a taxi for half an hour every morn- 




ing .. . very few children their ages here. Ben and Abby 
are more fortunate since they attend Chinese 
kindergarten and have been able to make a few Chinese 
friends. Abby has picked up enough Chinese so that she 
and Mary . . . make their little friends feel somewhat 
at home to play here. 

"With all the grades in I can say that I have been 
pleased with the students' performance this first 
semester. I gave them the same tests I gave at Sus- 
quehanna last year and the averages were about the 
same. Tunghai has many problems but I will return 
home knowing that we are able to solve some of them in 
the Chemistry Department. Interestingly enough, the 
communication problem has been very small. . . ." 

Their friends at Susquehanna wish the Potters the 
very best in their remaining time in Taiwan, and look 
forward to their return later this year. 



WINTER 1975 



27 



su 


CROSS COUNTRY 


Opp 


CRUZRdER SCOREBORRd 


SU 


JV SOCCER 


Opp 




30 


Lebanon Valley 


27 








1 


Bucknell 







23 


Kings 


38 








6 


Kings 







50 


Bucknell 


15 








3 


Dickinson 


4 




20 


York 


42 











Bloomsburg State 


1 




31 


Western Maryland 


26 










Won 2 Lost 2 TiedO 






50 


Juniata 


15 
















47 


Delaware Valley 


15 










FIELD HOCKEY 






23 


Elizabethtown 


37 








SU 




Opp 




26 


Albright 


33 








2 


Juniata 




37 


Dickinson 


18 




FALL 1974-75 




1 


Bucknell 


o 




29 


Baptist Bible 


26 




VARSITY FOOTBALL 




10 


Lycoming 







25 


Wilkes 


30 











Dickinson 


2 




50 


Gettysburg 


15 


su 




Opp 





Messiah 


1 




22 


Scranton 


38 


14 


Grove City 


14 


3 


Bloomsburg State 


1 






Won 6 Lost 8 




7 


Westminster 


14 


2 


Lebanon Valley 


3 










7 


Juniata 


21 


2 


Wilkes 


1 






VARSITY SOCCER 




31 


Geneva 





1 


Shippensburg State 


3 




SU 




Opp 


9 


Albright 


14 




Won 5 Lost 4 TiedO 






3 


Wagner 


1 


14 


Delaware Valley 













1 


Western Maryland 





8 


Wilkes 


10 








7 


Lebanon Valley 


1 


30 


Lycoming 


18 




JV FIELD HOCKEY 




1 


Gettysburg 


2 


10 


Waynesburg 


11 


SU 




Opp 




3 


Upsala 


1 


33 


Upsala 


14 


3 


Juniata 


2 




3 


Lycoming 


3 




Won 4 Lost 5 Tiedl 







Bucknell 


5 







Elizabethtown 


2 








4 


WACC 







1 


St. Bonaventure 


1 




JV FOOTBALL 







Dickinson 


6 




1 


Bucknell 


6 


SU 




Opp 


1 


Messiah 


1 




5 


Wilkes 


3 


6 


Lycoming 


24 





Bloomsburg State 


1 







Scranton 


1 


14 


Lock Haven State 


21 


1 


Lebanon Valley 


2 




3 


Dickinson 


2 


6 


Stevens Trade 


12 


2 


Wilkes 


1 







Muhlenberg 


3 


13 


Juniata 


22 





Shippensburg State 


1 






Won 6 Lost 5 Tied 2 







Lycoming 


14 




Won 3 Lost 5 Tiedl 














WonO Lost 5 TiedO 














ipmu 



[ ^m^M\ 



m*i: 




This pair of remarkable photos (by Vannucci of Williamsport) indicate what happened 
when the Crusaders beat Lycoming 30-18. At left. Jim Camut shows his opponent 
just how touchdowns are made. The picture at right appears to be of the headless, 
legless remains of a Lyco quarterback after being hit very hard by one of ours. 



28 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Fall sports reviewed . . . winter season in process 



SU Sports 



by PETE SILVESTRI 



THE PHENOMENON of "rising expectations" makes the 
1974 Crusader football campaign difficult to assess. 
Although the 4-5- 1 record fell short of the pre-season goal of a 
winning season, it was the best mark since 1970, and the 
team's playing performances were much better than its 
record indicates. But those outstanding efforts caused many 
S.U. fans to wish for better results, and to wonder why a team 
with such talent could not post more wins. 

The sad truth is that at least three defeats (Westminster, 
Albright, Waynesburg) came at the hands of teams that were 
clearly outplayed by Susquehanna, and two losses (Juniata, 
Wilkes) and the one tie were contests that could have been 
won. The Crusaders were never out of any game they played, 
and there was little doubt about any of the four victories. But 
the team was repeatedly unable to avoid the mistakes and 
make the big plays that could have made a difference in the six 
close games that were lost or tied. 

The final statistics indicate the extent to which Sus- 
quehanna dominated its opposition, with advantages of 16.3 
to 11.6 in points per game, 19.2 to 15.4 per game in first 
downs, 177.8 to 143.9in net rushing yardage, 121.5 to 106 in 
passing yardage, and 300.7 to 249.9 in total offense. 

At the post-season banquet, Quarterback Club members 
called it "the best 4-5-1 team in the country." But assistant 
coach Dick Purnell, accustomed to winning championships 
as coach at Shikellamy High School, noted that the players 
and coaching staff would gladly "trade that excellent 4-5-1 
mark for the worst 9-0 record in the country next year." The 
schedule is back down to nine games in 1975. Geneva is off the 
slate, but the other opponents are the same as in 1974. 

The opening game set the tone for the season. Sus- 
quehanna had GroveCity on the ropes, driving for a possible 
touchdown or at least a "chip-shot" field goal try by Chuck 
Smeltz '75 of Sunbury when a last minute pass that was sup- 
posed to go out of bounds to stop the clock was intercepted in 
the end zone by Grove City, the game ending in a 14-14 tie. 

S.U. outgained Westminster 256 total yards to 130. but 
lost four fumbles and the game, 14-7. The Crusaders stayed 



even with Juniata in yards gained, but again lost four fumbles, 
and were defeated by 21-7. 

Susquehanna dominated Geneva and scored a 31-0 
whitewash for its first victory as Smeltz broke the NCAA 
College Division record for consecutive extra point kicks with 
his 66th in a row. The Crusaders manhandled Albright, un- 
beaten at the time, for three quarters, and took a 9-0 lead into 
the final period. Then the offense fizzled and the defense fell 
apart, and Albright pulled out a 14-9 victory. The offense was 
"flat" against Delaware Valley, coach Jim Hazlett said, but 
the defense scored its second shutout of the season and a 14-0 
victory. Wilkes, which won the MAC-North crown, had a 
tough time with S.U. The margin of the Colonels' 10-8 vic- 
tory came from the longest field goal in Wilkes history (41 
yards), and was nearly eclipsed in the closing seconds by a 48- 
yard Smeltz attempt that was between the uprights but fell 
just short of the crossbar. 

The Crusaders handed Lycoming an 18-3 halftime lead, 
before pulling themselves together and storming back to 
score a 30-18 victory. In showing the game films, assistant 
coach Charlie Kunes felt obliged to preface the second half by 
saying, "now these are the same players wearing the same 
numbers as in the first half." He could have cracked the same 
joke the following week, but it wouldn't have been funny. The 
Crusaders followed their most stirring comeback of the 
season with their most disappointing collapse. 

The Hazlettmen physically beat up Waynesburg 
throughout the first half, and only several costly penalties 
kept them from building up more than a 10-0 lead. But during 
intermission, in the cold, damp, cinderblock shed "locker 
room," the spirit born a week earlier at Lycoming somehow 
died, and the second half at Waynesburg was played by the 
same team that had stumbled through the first half in 
Williamsport. With a last-minute field goal, Waynesburg 
pulled out an 1 1-10 victory. 

The season ended with something expected, Upsala's 
17th straight loss, and something unexpected, a missed PAT 
by Smeltz. Enroute to a 33-14 rout, the Crusaders packed 



WINTER 1975 



29 




These seniors played their last game for Susquehanna in the Crusader victory 

over Upsala on November 16. front: Joe Narcavage, Ml. Carmel, Pa.; Mark Haslett. 

Springdale. Pa.; Mike J. Kennedy. Delran. N.J.; Chuck Smetlz. Sunbury. Back: 

Bob Brett. Roslyn. Pa.; Keith Green, Red Lion. Pa.; Mike Buterbaugh. Gibsonia. Pa.. 

Bud Morgan. Philadelphia; Pete Rambo. Philadelphia. While winning only four 

games, the Crusaders dominated most of the statistics and gained many honors. 



three touchdowns into the first quarter, and Smeltz booted 
the PATs to run his NCAA College Division record total to 
75 in a row. Then, with the University Division record of 77 
within reach, Smeltz missed for the first time in his college 
career on both his 76th and 77th attempts. 

The number of post-season laurels heaped on the 
Crusaders confirmed that they were a pretty good 4-5-1 
group. Smeltz was named as place-kicker on the All-East, 
ECAC Division III, and MAC-North all-star teams. He also 
made MAC-North as a defensive end. Others receiving 
league honors were quarterback Mike Buterbaugh '75 (Gib- 
sonia, Pa.) who led the division in passing and total offense, 
split end Jeff Steltz '76 (Wyomissing, Pa.), offensive tackle 
Bob Brett '75 (Roslyn, Pa.), linebacker Joe LoCastro '76 
(Barrington, N.J.), and safety Pete Rambo '75 
(Philadelphia). Receiving honorable mention on the All- 
State team were Brett and offensive tackle Gerry Huesken '77 



(Palmyra, N.J.), who also was given honorable mention on 
the AP Little All-American squad. Brett was also named as 
one of the top 35 fall season Scholar-Athletes in the country 
by the NCAA. 

The annual All-Lutheran College selections from among 
28 Lutheran colleges in the nation included Smeltz as kicking 
specialist on the second team offense, with honorable men- 
tion going to Brett, Buterbaugh and Rambo. 

Receiving S.U. coaching staff awards were Smeltz, 
Clyde R. Spitzner MVP Award; Rambo, best back; defensive 
tackle Pat Lowe '76 (Johnson City, N.Y.), best lineman; 
fullback Paul O'Neill '78 (Stratford, N.J.) best rookie; half- 
back Jim Camut '77 (Johnstown, Pa.), most improved; safety 
Dave Breymeier '78 (Duryea, Pa.), most aggressive; split end 
John Xanthis '77 (Newburgh, N.Y.), best reserve back; and 
two-way tackle Mike Piersol '78 (Sinking Spring, Pa.), best 
reserve lineman. Buterbaugh was cited for setting a new 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



school record with 92 pass completions during the season, 
surpassing Ernie Tyler's 1969 total of 87. 

Although noting that occasional momentary lapses had 
cost games, Hazlett praised the 1974 squad as the most 
cooperative and hardest-working he has coached. The offen- 
sive line especially drew praise from Hazlett throughout the 
season. With 27 lettermen expected to return, perhaps next 
year the Crusaders can satisfy even the "Monday morning 
quarterbacks" who are happy only with victories. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

has completed 76 seasons of football 

since the first in 1892 

for a grand total of 569 games: 

228 wins, 304 losses, 37 ties. 



Field Hockey 

The biggest surprise of the fall was the field hockey team. 
Under first-year coach Connie Delbaugh, the women sur- 
passed the win total and equaled the goal total of the entire 
1973 season in their first game, a 2-1 win over Juniata; 
equaled the win total of the previous three years combined in 
the second outing, a 1-0 decision over Bucknell; and went on 
to achieve the first winning field hockey campaign since 1962 
with a 5-4 mark. 

Leading the team in goals were Sally Scheid '75 
(Oreland, Pa.) and Leslie Beers '76 (Springfield, Pa.). Liz 
Graham '75 (Bethesda, Md.) earned her fourth letter at 
center halfback and Bev Hafer '75 (New Columbia, Pa.) was 
outstanding as goalie. The team received a big boost from 
four freshmen who lettered: JoAnn Kinkel (Red Lion, Pa.), 
Audrey Kiljian (Media, Pa.), Margaret Schozer (Wantagh, 
N.Y.), and Anne Guckes (West Chester, Pa.), who is also the 
only female on Susquehanna's ice hockey club team. 

Soccer 

The soccer team, under interim coach Will Kepner, set a 
tough pre-season goal for itself — improving on 1973's 6-2-4 
record which was the best in the squad's 14-year history — and 
fell short with a 6-4-2 regular season mark. But Kepner, 
filling in while Dr. Neil Potter is on sabbatical in Taiwan, did 
guide the team to a second consecutive invitation to play in 
the ECAC regional post-season tournament, where the 
booters lost to Muhlenberg, 3-0. 

Paced by six goals from Kurt Kohler '76 (Grosse Pointe 
Woods, Mich.), the soccer team equaled the school record for 
goals in one season with 28. John Waddell '75 (Reedsville, 
Pa.), who switched from halfback to center fullback, received 
honorable mention on the MAC-North all-star squad and 
received a trophy from coach Kepner as the team's best defen- 
sive player. Freshmen Brian Jadney (Churchville, Pa.) and 
Tom Cook (Loysville, Pa.) were co-winners of the best rookie 



award. The squad elected Pat Kreger '76 (Trenton, N.J.) and 
Jim Schrader '77 (Livingston, N.J.) as co-captains for 1975. 
The high points of the 1974 campaign came at the begin- 
ning and the end of the regular season. The booters started 
with three straight wins by a combined margin of 1 1-2, and 
ended with a come-from-behind 3-2 victory over a Dickinson 
team that had defeated S.U. in 1973. 



Cross Country 

Coach Bruce Wagenseller said the 1974 cross country 
season taught him something: "Don't make any predictions." 
With all eight 1973 lettermen expected to return, Wagenseller 
had hoped the squad would at least equal the previous year's 
8-5 record. However, three lettermen decided not to par- 
ticipate in 1974 and before the campaign's end the two top 
runners, Jeff Yoder '76 (Mt. Carmel, Pa.) and Joe Cramer 
'77 (Toms River, N.J.), were both lost to injuries. This left 
Wagenseller with an eight-man squad which managed a 6-8 
mark — highly respectable under the circumstances. 
Freshman Robert Whomsley (Cherry Hill, N.J.) received 
trophies from the coach as both the outstanding rookie and 
the highest point man on the squad. 

Winter Sports 

It is too early as this goes to press to draw any final con- 
clusions, but at the Christmas break the wrestling and basket- 
ball squads were doing the reverse of what had been expected. 
The grapplers, not entertaining great hopes with only four 
lettermen returning from a 3-7 team, went home for Christ- 
mas with a 2-0 mark, while the basketball squad, hoping for a 
fine year with eight lettermen back from a 13-12 group, came 
out of the Lutheran Brotherhood Tournament in Minneapo- 
lis over vacation with a 2-6 record. 

The wrestlers opened with a 30-24 win over Juniata and 
followed with a 20- 1 8 decision over Messiah in which a win by 
freshman heavyweight Mike Piersol (Sinking Spring, Pa.) in 
the final match climaxed a Crusader comeback. The basket- 
ball team topped Messiah -73-65 for its first win after four 
straight defeats. Junior forward Dave Long (Doylestown, 
Pa.) averaged 18 points over the first five games, followed by 
freshman guard Mike Scheib (Millersburg, Pa.) with 11.4 
and senior forward Ralph Wolckenhauer (River Vale, N.J.) 
with 11.2. In Minneapolis, the cagers lost to Augsburg, 
defeated Upsala, and were nipped 61-60 by Luther. 

All-American 

The most impressive S.U. athletic performance of the 
fall was turned in by a member of the women's physical 
education faculty and coaching staff. Rose Ann Neff, new 
head women's basketball and assistant field hockey coach, 
earned selection on the U.S. National Field Hockey Squad 
for her play as captain of the Mid-East regional team in the 
U.S. Field Hockey Association National Tournament at 
DeKalb, 111., in November. Last spring Miss Neff was chosen 
as a reserve member of the National Women's Lacrosse 
Team. She is also good at golf and tennis, and at the noon 
hour can be seen on the basketball court dribbling circles 
around male faculty and administration members. 



WINTER 1975 



31 



I 



ATTENTION PARENTS 

I f this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address a< your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 





2VZ£- 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undeliverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



SPRING 1975 




-EUTK07S 




The Susquehanna Alumnus 



DN OUR COVER: Following Commence- 
nent on May 31, President GustaveW. Weber 
at right) chats with three who received 
tonorary degrees: Pauline Tompkins, presi- 
lent of Cedar Crest College and Commence- 
nent speaker, Litt.D.; The Rev. Carl H. Mau, 
;eneral secretary of the Lutheran World 
■ederation and Baccalaureate preacher, 
LL.D.; The Rev. Manas Buthelezi, South 
\frican Lutheran leader, D.D. 

A political scientist, Dr. Tompkins is a 
brmer executive of the American Association 
)f University Women and serves in several im- 
»ortant national educational posts. Dr. Mau, 
vhose headquarters are in Geneva, 
Switzerland, represents 55 million Lutherans 
hroughout the world. Dr. Buthelezi, currently 
:ead of the Christian Institute in Natal 
'rovince, is the only person ever to have lifted 
he "ban" imposed by the apartheid govern- 
nent of his country. 

C. Willard Smith of Bucknell University was 
jive the Pd.D. (see page 21). 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H CARR '52 

Staff Writers 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 
MARGARET F. ERNST 



Ki$mU$MiUummWitiKit 



Alumni Association 



Seorge H Baniley '41. president. William C Davenport 
53 Robert Hackenberg '56, vice presidents, Signe S 
Sales 71. secretary; Chester G Rowe 52. treasurer; 
Douglas E Arthur 49, Henry J Keil 39, Edward S. Rogers 
it 42 Samuel D Ross Jr '54. representatives on the 
Jniversity Board ol Directors, Simon B Rhoads '30, Louis 
e Santangelo 50. representatives on the University Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Committee 



Vol. 44 



SPRING 1975 



No. 3 



CONTENTS 

Euro '75 Inside front cover 

The Sights and Sounds of Alumni Weekend 4 

Plastino: Paralegal Intern 10 

by Peter Silvestri 

The Local Scene 14 

by George Tamke 

A Great Man for Susquehanna and for the 

Pennsylvania Dutch: Russell Gilbert 15 

Susquehannans On Parade 16 

"I Do" 21 

Books, Used and Rare 22 

Born Crusaders 24 

Deaths 26 

Crusader Scoreboard 29 

SU Sports 30 

by Pete Silvestri 



Executive Board members-at-large. term expiring 1976: 
Samuel D. Clapper '68, James Gormley '55, Lester C. 
Hellman '52, Alan C. Lovell 70, Franklin G. Smith '55. 
Term expiring 1977; Marie Wernlkowskl MacFarlan '62, 
flwood M. McAllister '49. Virginia Carlson McKenzle '69. 
[Wl R Smith '63. James W, White '58. Term expiring 1978: 
Imothy E, Barnes '35. Judith A. Blee '62, Martha A. Fisher 
73. D. Edgar Hutchison '34. Gene L. Stock "56. 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 193I, at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 1 7870. under the Act of August 24, 19 1 2. Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SPRING 1975 



The Sights and Sounds 
Of Alumni Weekend 



Alumni Weekend is one of the more exciting times of the year at 
Susquehanna and this year was no exception. The dates were May 
2, 3, and 4. On these few pages the Alumnus depicts some of the 
weekend sights for its readers. The sounds, since the magazine is 
not on tape, can only be suggested— sounds like the click of a club 
hitting a golf ball, the squeal of delight when someone recognizes 
an old roommate, the din of voices and laughter and Rudy Gelnett's 
piano at Jack Shipe's and at the crowded luncheon, the reading of 
award citations and the appreciative applause, Dr. Weber's jokes 
and Johnny Gensel's Weber-story, the cheers for the homerun that 
won the first of two baseball games for the Crusaders, the dinner- 
dance music, and Bob Sander's Sunday morning sermon. . . 



MINUTES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEETING 



THE SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY Alumni Association met 
in the Campus Center at Selinsgrove on Saturday, May 3, 1975 for 
the annual Alumni Weekend business session in connection with the 
Alumni Luncheon. There were 502 in attendance. The meeting was 
called to order by President George Bantley '41 and the invocation 
was pronounced by the Rev. Dr. Edgar S. Brown h'75, chaplain to the 
University. 

Following the luncheon, Buss Carr '52, director of alumni 
relations, introduced May Queen Charlotte Graham of Lebanon, 
Pa., members of her court and their elected escorts who assisted Bob 
Hackenberg '56 in presenting remembrances to emeriti alumni and 
those celebrating the 50th anniversary of their graduation. Other re- 
union classes recognized were 1930, 1935, 1940, 1945, 1950, 1955, 
I960, and 1965. The Class of 1975 was received into the Alumni 
Association and its president. Charles Janaskie of Camp Hill, Pa., 
announced the class gift of a campus park to be located in front of the 
Campus Center. The gift was accepted by Dr. Weber, president of the 
University, with appropriate remarks. 

The business session opened with a motion to approve the 
minutes of the last meeting as reproduced and distributed. Bob 
Hackenberg, Alumni Day chairman, announced the weekend 
schedule and expressed appreciation to the persons who were in- 
strumental in making the weekend a success. Lester Heilman '52, 
chairman of Club Activities, announced that there were 1 1 area club 
meetings held this year with over 400 alumni attending. One par- 
ticular activity that was successful was the planning of meetings in 
connection with concerts by the Susquehanna Band or Choir. Buss 
Carr "52, reporting for the Nominations Committee, announced the 



results of the election for the five members-at-large to the Alumni Ex- 
ecutive Committee: D. Edgar Hutchison '34, Timothy E. Barnes '35, 
Gene L. Stock '56, Judith A. Blee '62, Martha A. Fisher '73. The 
slate of nominees for office for the coming year: George H. Bantley 
'41, president; William C. Davenport '53, and Robert Hackenberg 
'56, vice presidents; Signe S. Gates '71, secretary; Chester G. Rowe 
'52, treasurer. There were no further nominations from the floor. 
Nominations were closed and the secretary was instructed to cast a 
single ballot for the entire slate. William C. Davenport '53, chairman 
of the University Relations Committee, referred to the published 
minutes with special mention of alumni help in student placement, 
and recommended that an alumni directory be published at the 
earliest possible time. Buss Carr then presented Mrs. Margaret 
Ernst, secretary in the Alumni Office, with a watch from the Alumni 
Association. She is retiring June 1, 1975. 

Awards Committee Chairman Donald E. Wissinger '50 made 
these presentations for 1975: Distinguished Citizenship Award to 
Barbara Miller Mitchell of Selinsgrove; Senior Man and Woman 
Most Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna to John D. Granger of 
Cleona, Pa. and Susan B. Gordon of Johnstown, Pa.; Achievement 
Medal to the Rev. Dr. John Garcia Gensel '40 of New York City; 
Service Medals to Blanche Forney Rogers '42 and Edward S. Rogers 
'42 of Yardley, Pa. 

The luncheon meeting was adjourned with the singing of the 
Alma Mater. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Signe S. Gates '71, Secretary 



SPRING 1975 




f. iT 




till I I H ' ' B ^^h 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 









The golfers had a great lime Friday on the spacious links 
of the Susquehanna Valley Country Club, although the first 
try at a tennis match didn't have enough takers. The 
golf tournament was won by Ruth Naylor Shaffer '41 (who 
for some reason doesn't show up in any of our pictures) 
and Bill Clark '62 ( with the wild shirt in the center left 
pholo. opposite page). Above: Terry Malzone of Cranbury, 
N.J. and Charles Janaskie of Camp Hill, Pa., vice 
president and president of the Senior class which gave 
its alma mater a park for the front of the Campus Center. 



SPRING 1975 




Upper left: President Weber and Barbara Mitchell, editor-publisher of 

The Selinsgrove Times-Tribune, admire the 1975 Distinguished Citizenship 

Award presented to Mrs. Mitchell. Right: Queen and King of Alumni 

Weekend were seniors Charlotte Graham of Lebanon. Pa. and Joe Prekopa 

of McAdoo. Pa. Lower left: Susan Gordon of Johnstown. Pa. and John 

Granger of Cleona. Pa. listen to Don Wissinger '50 announce them 

winners of Alumni Award medals as the Senior Man and Woman Most 

Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna. In foreground is George Banlley '41. 

president of the Alumni Association. Right: Editor Janice Trojan '76 

reads the 1975 Lanthorn dedication to Dorothy Anderson '62. dean of 

freshmen and associate dean of students, on the SU staff since 1967. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Medal winners John Gensel '40. Blanche Forney Rogers '42. and Ed Rogers '42. 



SUSQUEHANNA'S 1975 Alumni Award medals were 
presented to the Rev. John Garcia Gensel '40, for Achieve- 
ment, and Blanche Forney Rogers '42 and Edward S. Rogers 
'42, for Service. 

Dr. Gensel (he was conferred with his alma mater's D.D. 
in 1963) is well known as pastor to thejazz community in New 
York City. A native of Puerto Rico and raised in Catawissa, 
Pa., he went from S.U. to the Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nary at Gettysburg, served as a chaplain in the U.S. Navy, 
held pastorates in Ohio and Puerto Rico, and has been in New 
York since 1956. He began his unique ministry in 1959 and it 
has been a full-time calling for him for the past 10 years. His 
base is St. Peter's Lutheran Church in Manhattan, where he 



is associate pastor and where thejazz idiom is an integral part 
of many religious services. 

The Rogers couple, who live in Yardley, Pa., have been 
leaders in alumni activities for many years — hosting 
freshman parties, taking part in telethons, recruiting stu- 
dents, and holding office on boards and committees. Mr. 
Rogers is a past president of the Alumni Association and 
currently a member of the University Board of Directors. A 
research engineer at the David Sarnoff Research Center for 
RCA in Princeton, N.J., he has published papers in the field 
of acoustics and communication systems, holds a number of 
patents, and has received several professional achievement 
awards. He earned an M.S. at Case Institute of Technology. 



SPRING 1975 



Plastino: PARALEGAL 

INTERN 



4 



1 




by PETER SILVESTRI 






■-fcv' 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




The subject of this article at work in the Sunbury 
office of Central Susquehanna Valley Legal Services. 



TONY PLASTINO '76 of Lancaster, Pa. spent the 
spring term learning about politics and society and ex- 
amining his own values and future career goals through 
a new internship program of the Susquehanna Univer- 
sity Political Science Department. 

The 10-week program involved about 25 hours per 
week serving a paralegal internship in the Sunbury of- 
fice of Central Susquehanna Valley Legal Services. 
Tony received two course credits for a first hand educa- 
tion in civil and criminal law and the problems of the 
poor in today's society. His work for the legal aid office 
ranged from researching case precedents in law librar- 
ies to setting up a series of lectures and discussions for 
senior citizens on legal problems of the aged. 

However, as is the case with students who have 
been involved in the other internships offered by Sus- 
quehanna in various business and social service 
situations, Tony found that the most valuable 
knowledge and insights he gained from the experience 
were related to personal growth and development 
rather than strictly academic matters. He says that the 



internship aided the establishment of his own career 
goals by allowing him to "see into the future" and ex- 
perience the workaday world and what it is to "be 
responsible" as a concerned and contributing member 
of society. 

Tony knows that it is easy for a student to live in a 
"wonderland world" in blissful ignorance or disregard 
of the realities of life, both in terms of making a living 
for oneself and being of service to others. He says that 
the internship gave him the opportunity to "test" 
himself in a life situation in which he might find himself 
after graduation. This testing process concerned many 
personal questions to which Tony did not have the 
answers: How deep and lasting was his interest in prac- 
ticing law? How competent could he be at this vocation 
in particular or at "working with other people" in an 
"office" environment in general? How strong was his 
desire and commitment to work "to help others" rather 
than to pursue "the buck." 

The internship arrangement also benefits Legal 
Services, which can use the help, according to Joseph 



SPRING 1975 



11 





In the unimposing headquarters of 

Legal Services, Tony confers with director 

Campagna and other staff members. 



Campagna, director of the Sunbury office of the Cen- 
tral Susquehanna Valley organization. Not being a 
profit-making venture, Legal Services is dependent on 
funding from Federal, state and local governments. 
Some politicians resent and distrust the legal aid peo- 
ple, who tend to act as a "watchdog" over governmen- 
tal agencies, and are not overly generous with financial 
support. That Legal Services are not lavishly funded is 
evident from the humble headquarters facility of the 
Sunbury office, located in a partially renovated old 
two-family house on Market Street. 

The internship began during the third term this 
year, but the Political Science Department and Legal 
Services hope that one student can be placed in the legal 
aid office during each term in the future. Tony is a 
political science major, but the program will also be 
open to students in other related fields. 

Legal Services are "advocacy oriented," Tony 
says. In addition to providing legal assistance to in- 
dividuals who come in with problems and cannot afford 
to hire a private attorney. Legal Services seeks to 
protect the rights of all poor people with regard to 
government and public and private agencies and to ad- 
vocate changes to make those bodies more responsive 
to the public interest. As examples, Tony cites a dispute 
between Legal Services and local courts over com- 
pliance with a Supreme Court ruling that indigents be 
allowed to file for divorce without paying a $175 court 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



fee, and an effort by Legal Services to end what it 
believes are discriminatory admissions policies by local 
housing authorities. 

Court cases can involve litigation between a tenant 
and landlord, buyer and seller, debtor and creditor, or 
suits over personal and family matters. Intervention 
with an agency on behalf of a client can involve an issue 
such as a person who believes he is not getting what he is 
entitled to from social security, workman's compensa- 
tion, unemployment or veterans' disability payments. 
Tony conducted some client interviews and fact in- 
vestigations, but his major projects during the ten 




weeks were to organize research files on categories of 
cases for the legal aid office and to arrange the lecture 
series for senior citizens. Tony got speakers from 
various public and private agencies to talk to the elderly 
on such topics as insurance, nursing homes, wills, 
welfare, social security, tenant rights, and consumer 
complaints. The purpose, Tony says, is "to inform 
senior citizens of their rights and how to help 
themselves and advise their friends." He says that the 
elderly are often ignorant of their rights and when they 
believe they are being treated wrongly they are often 
"afraid to make waves and unaware of people who can 
help them." 

Tony's role in the work of the legal aid office kept 
him busy. He found the staff very cooperative and help- 
ful, but he knew that they could not afford to take too 
much time away from their professional duties to ex- 
plain things to him. "I had to be on my toes," he says, 
so that he did not have to be told the same thing twice. 
Getting up every morning and spending four to six 
hours on the job left him "beat" when he returned to 
campus or his apartment in Selinsgrove. In addition to 
serving the internship, he also took one course on cam- 
pus during the term. Unlike some other Susquehanna 
student interns, Tony received no stipend for his labors. 
But he has no complaint about that. He says that the ex- 
perience he gained was payment enough. Tony's life is 
not all work, however. During the spring term he also 
found time to play with the highly successful Sus- 
quehanna Rugby Club, and in the fall he is a first string 
defensive end with the Crusader football team. 

Tony says that through the internship experience he 
was "stimulated in a lot of ways," and found answers to 
the questions referred to previously. He thinks that he 
will go to law school and pursue a "socially-oriented" 
career in legal services for the poor. He believes that 
legal aid people are "understaffed and underpaid" and 
he learned that "sad things can happen to poor people." 
But he sees no cause for despair and prefers being aware 
of the unpleasant aspects of life and having feelings for 
others rather than becoming "a robot." He says he 
wants to "maintain a human attitude" and believes he 
"can help and can get results." 



Varsity football player Plaslino walks 
off the field following one of 
last season's Susquehanna games. 



SPRING 1975 



13 



THE LOCAL SCENE 



byGEORGETAMKE 



WHEN DR. WALTER FREED told the Board of Directors 
that Cedar Crest College President Pauline Tompkins was to 
be the first woman ever to deliver the Commencement ad- 
dress at Susquehanna, I noticed a coed observer (and just 
what is a coed in this Age of Women's Liberation?) offer a 
cheering gesture with her right arm. 

It made me think of Billy Jean King's famous tennis vic- 
tory, and Gloria Steinem and Barbara Jordan and Connie 
Parvey and other women in the recent news who have been ac- 
tively championing women's rights or simply making it in 
fields heretofore reserved largely for men. And it reminded 
me that Susquehanna (then Missionary Institute) was really 
one of the pioneers in coeducation when it admitted women 
students in 1873. And that it was in danger of going complete- 
ly the other way in the late '20s when a study of all its church- 
related colleges conducted by the then-United Lutheran 
Church suggested that Susquehanna ought to become a 
women's college. 

But it didn't and I'm glad. Because coeducation has 
flourished mightily at Susquehanna. It has produced some 
fine student leaders, and great teachers, musicians, doctors 
and businesswomen among the fairer sex (dare I call them 
that?). And it has helped produce many happy families, too! 

Now, the skeptics may be tempted to think that this 
University has been party to one grand put-up job to exploit 
the International Women's Year. After all, we not only had 
our first woman Commencement speaker, Barbara Mitchell 
was the first woman winner of the Distinguished Citizenship 
Award. The 1975 Lanthorn was dedicated to Dean of 
Freshmen Dorothy Anderson '62. And one of our gals, 
Margy DuVal '76 of Montclair, N. J., was elected the national 
president of the Intercollegiate Association of Women 
Students. But that's not the way it was. I was privy to some of 
the discussions and selections and I know there was no put-up 
job. These women, bless 'em, were chosen fairly and 
squarely — for themselves. 

So, we welcomed Dr. Tompkins to our podium and we 
congratulate, again, the winners of awards and offices. And 
we're happy to say thank you to our women for all they have 
done for Susquehanna and for us. . . . 

Which brings us to Peg Ernst. Margaret (Mrs. Donald) 
Ernst joined the secretarial staff at Susquehanna on May 1, 
1959. Originally, she worked for the late Dan MacCuish 
while he was still wearing three hats for admissions, alumni 
and public relations. When I arrived in June she did letters 
and news releases for me, too. And when Don Wissinger '50 
assumed the alumni relations job in September, Peg was the 
official veteran secretary in the Alumni Office. She was with 
Don for three years, with John Hendricks '57 for one year. 




Peg Ernst, Alumni Office secretary, checks 
the time with Buss Carr '52, director of 
alumni relations, who surprised her at the 
May 3 Alumni Luncheon with presentation of a 
watch recognizing her 16 years of service. 



another year virtually on her own, and then with Buss Carr 
'52 for the past 1 1 years — 16 years in a key spot of continuing 
contact with thousands of alumni. 

I'll never forget that year of 1963-64 when we didn't have 
an alumni relations director. Keeping things running kind of 
fell to me. We were in the midst of a capital campaign, too, so 
"keeping things running" in the Alumni Office kind of fell to 
Peg. She kept things running then, as she had before and has 
ever since. She has our everlasting gratitude. 

Peg, of course, has been much more than a secretary. 
Besides receiving dictation and transcribing thousands of 
letters, she wrote many hundreds more herself, spent hours 
culling newspapers and making telephone calls to track down 
the details of an alumni story, a marriage, a birth, a death. In 
16 years, she prepared a whale of a lot of material for this 
magazine. She has been our star reporter. 

Peg Ernst has given of herself as a way of life, with 
diligence, with unflagging loyalty, and with good humor. She 
gave Susquehanna her four children, too — Dr. Mary Lou 
Ernst Fonberg'58, Sonja Ernst Sampsell x'63, Sharon Ernst 
Lauver'68, and Donald Ernst '74. We salute her as she retires 
from our midst, and wish her many years of much-deserved 
happiness. 

Turning to another subject, we were quite thrilled the 
other week to read a couple of reviews from European critics 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



A great man tor Susquehanna and for 
the Pennsylvania Dutch 

RUSSELL GILBERT 




DR. RUSSELL W. GILBERT, professor emeritus of German, was honored by The 
Pennsylvania German Society with an April 26 presentation of a Citation "in ap- 
preciation for the contributions he has made to the study of the Pennsylvania Ger- 
mans, to the dialect literature, and to this Society which he has served, since 1946, as 
director, vice president, and president." 

The attractive document, in fraktur and colors, includes a stanza from "Gott Is 
Mei Freind im Ganse Yaahr" (God Is My Friend the Whole Year Through), one of 
100 of the professor's poems recently published in Bilder un Gedanke (Pictures and 
Thoughts), which also happens to be the 100th volume published by the Society and 
its predecessors, the Pennsylvania German Society and the Pennsylvania German 
Folklore Society. 

Dr. Gilbert, who taught at Susquehanna for 40 years until his retirement in 
1970, is regarded as the "best contemporary dialect poet" in a language which was 
once almost exclusively spoken, rather than written. His book is a delight, even for 
the reader who does not understand "Dutch," as each poem is accompanied by a 
brief explanation or translation. Selected from all his verse written between 1943 and 
1974, the poems are rich in humor, imagery, color, and lyric quality. 

Editor of this magazine during World War II, the poet had a very active career 
while at the University — chairing the Modern Languages Department as well as the 
Athletic Committee, coaching debate, even officiating at baseball games. He still 
keeps busy, but is not quite as active after several hospital visits. He and Mrs. Gilbert 
are the parents of Joyce K. Gilbert '54, assistant registrar at S.U., and Ar'an K. 
Gilbert '55, who teaches history at Hillsdale College. 

— G.T. 



concerning appearances of Susquehanna's Band and Choir in 
late winter (see inside front cover). In La Republique du Cen- 
tre, J. Pascual wrote of the concert in the Chartres Cathedral: 

"It must be said that the orchestra is of a rare quality, 
and the calculated measure of tone quality is in relationship to 
the density and volume maintained at constant balance, im- 
portant details which are not overlooked by director James 
Steffy. . . . Woodwinds and brass gave a consistently clear vi- 
sion of the polyphonic blend, of the sonorous pleasure of a 
well-adjusted interpretation." 

Of Cy Stretansky's Choir, this reviewer "admired the 
value of these voices which rendered to us skillfully and easily 
as many shades of meaning as the sentiments with which they 
('Ave Maria' of des Pres, 'Verbum coro Factum est' of 
Hassler, and 'Holy, Holy, Holy' of Mendelssohn) are 
overflowing can suggest. . . . Let us then be grateful for the 
merits of these delightful performers . . ." 

Writing of the concert in Dinkelsbiihl, Hanns Brunner 
expressed surprise that the young musicians had no trace of 



fatigue at this concluding performance of their ten-day tour, 
and at the variety of the program. "Indeed," said he, "there 
has rarely been an opportunity for local music lovers to hear a 
concert of such a wide range of styles. . . . they master the 
musical language of the past and present with as much 
enthusiasm and pep as the big, wide-open American heart can 
stand. . . . 

"These 'Benjamins of instrumental music' took the 
hurdles of technically difficult musical figures with great skill 
and accomplishment," bearing witness "to an amazing 
musical discipline which is the result of careful and high quali- 
ty training. . . . They like to make music with a fresh spirit 
and nonchalance, even with a bit of magic. The result is a 
demonstration of accomplished and spontaneous concert 
music which fascinates the audience. ... a friend of the 
muses will not likely forget this quickly." 

We always knew our Susquehanna musicians were good, 
but it's nice, too, to know that these Ambassadors are so well 
appreciated by our friends overseas. 



SPRING 1975 



15 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'19 

The Rev. Dr. Willard D. Allbeck recent- 
ly had published his book, The History of 
Florida Lutheran Retirement Center. He 
sent S.U. a complimentary copy which was 
placed in the Blough Learning Center. Dr. 
Allbeck lives at 43 1 North Kansas Ave., 
DeLand, Fla. 32720. 

'24 

The Rev. W. John Derr and his wife 
toured Israel last fall. He is pastor emeritus 
of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Bellrose, 

N.Y. 

'25 

Dr. Norman R Benner received a 
Fellowship in the Academy of Family 
Physicians at the annual meeting of the 
Academy of General Practice held last fall 
in Los Angeles. 

'27 

Dewey S. Herrold was recipient of the 
Wesley Award from the Wesley United 
Methodist Church, Selinsgrove. He was 
honored for his many years of faithful ser- 
vice to the congregation and the communi- 
ty- 

'28 

The Rev. Dr. RussellJ. Crouse retired as 
minister of Morning Star Lutheran 
Church, Luray, Va. on January l. His 
career as a Lutheran pastor has included 
service in Pennsylvania at St. Matthew's, 
Shamokin Dam; St. John's Northumber- 
land; Trinity, Point Township; Grace, 
Berwick; St. James, Altoona; and Em- 
manuel, York. He also held pastorates at 
Messiah, Baltimore, and St. Timothy's, 
Forrest Park, Ga., and was active in the 
Georgia-Alabama Synod as a mission 
organizer, vice president of Central 
Conference, and vice president of the 
Forrest Park Ministerial Association. He 
and Mrs. Crouse now life in Columbia, Md. 

'29 

Professor Raymond O. Rhine, a faculty 
member at Massachusetts Bay Community 



Two groups of emeriti alumni, the 
50th and 45th reunion classes. 




16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




■ft A 1 



77ip 40(A and 35lh reunion classes, and the 25th 
(1950) and 20th (1955). There is no official 
picture of the 30th (1945) but most of its 
members appear on the center right photo, page 4. 



College. Concord Mass., was recently ap- 
pointed assistant chairman of the Division 
of Humanities. 

G. George Luck retired in January after 
25 years as Borough Council Secretary in 
Middleburg, Pa. 

'31 

Reno S. Knouse. professor of dis- 
tributive education at SUNY at Albany, 
received the American Vocational Asso- 
ciation's Distributive Education 
Professional Development Award at the 
association's annual convention in New 
Orleans. He is the first teacher-educator 
selected for the honor, presented to out- 
standing educators for professional devel- 
opment activities that contribute to the en- 
tire distributive education field. He and his 
wife reside at 40 Thorndale Rd., 
Slingerlands, NY. 

Dr. Ira C. Sassaman retired as staff 
assistant to the president of the Central 
Pennsylvania Synod, Lutheran Church in 
America. He has served on the Synod staff 
since 1956. 

'32 

The Rev. Herbert G. Hohman celebrates 
the 40th anniversary of his ordination in 
May. He is pastor at Grace Lutheran 
Church, Stoystown, Pa. 15563. His 
daughter, Cleone LaRuex'60. is married to 
the Rev. Lester E. Rudisill '59. 

'34 

The Rev. Dr. Harold L. Rowe hc'59 

retired January l as a mission developer un- 
der the LCA Board of American Missions, 
for which he worked in Pike Creek Valley. 
Del., for more than five years. He formerly 
served pastorates at Oriole Parish, Jersey 
Shore, Pa.; Bethany, Palmyra. N.J.; Trini- 
ty, Johnstown, Pa.; St. Mark's Colonial 
Park, Harrisburg; and Nativity, Newark, 
Del. He and his wife are living in York, Pa. 

'35 

Dr. Erie I. Shobert has been elected to 
the board of directors of the American 
National Standards Institute. The Institute 
is a clearing house and coordinating agency 
for voluntary standardization in the United 
States. 

'37 

The Rev. Dr. Raymond E. Shaheen, 
pastor of St. Luke Lutheran Church, Silver 
Spring, Md., is the only clergyman ap- 
pointed to a new five-person consulting 
committee for personnel of the Lutheran 
Church in America. The group will provide 
counsel in the review of salary plans, per- 
sonnel practices and evaluation procedures. 



SPRING 1975 



17 



'42 

S Jack Price of Ashland, Pa., has 
qualified for the 1974 Challenger Club, 
honorary organization for representatives 
of Nationwide Insurance Companies, for 
his high standards of sales and service. 

'43 

Donald F. Spooner, district com- 
missioner for Cubbing for the Nittany 
Mountain District of the Juniata Valley 
Council of Boy Scouts of America, received 
the district's Award of Merit. He has been 
actively engaged as a Scouter since 1962 at 
St. Paul's United Methodist Church in 
State College, Pa. His wife is the former 
Ruth Billow. 

'45 

Dr. Robert W. Surplus, professor of 
music and education at Eastern Kentucky 
University, was appointed to the Music 
Education Research Council of the Music 
Educators National Conference. He is state 
chairman of the Alliance for Arts Educa- 
tion, chairman of the Kentucky Music Ad- 
visory Council, and a member of the Ken- 
tucky Bicentennial Parade of Music Com- 
mittee. A past president of the Kentucky 
Music Education Association, he coor- 
dinates music education as well as graduate 
studies at EKU. 

'46 

Janet Rohrbach Robinson is now presi- 
dent of Tau Province, Sigma Alpha Iota. 
The province has ten chapters at colleges 
and universities in North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia and Alabama. 

'47 

Dr. George E. Riegel 111 joined Dravo 
Corporation's medical department staff 
headquartered on Neville Island, Pa. He 
has been engaged in family practice in 
Sewickley, Pa., for 24 years, and is a Fellow 
of the American Academy of Family 
Physicians. 

'49 

John G. Devine has been named assistant 
special agent in charge of FBI operations in 
Alaska. His address is P.O. Box 560, 
Anchorage, Alaska 99510. 

Dr. Paul R Bingaman. principal of 
Pennsylvania's State College Area Sr. 
H.S., was elected president of the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools. The association represents ap- 
proximately 1800 universities, colleges and 
high schools. The main duties of Middle 
States is to provide accreditation, evalua- 
tion, consultation, and in appropriate ways 
promote the improvement of higher educa- 
tion and secondary education. 



Edith Wagner Hebel and her husband, 
H Lee Hebel '48. hc'74. played a key role in 
the adoption of 16 Vietnamese orphan 
children this spring. Edith is director of the 
Adoption Department of the Pearl S. Buck 
Foundation. They live in Kellers Church, 
Pa., where Lee is pastor of St. Matthew's 
Lutheran Church. 

'53 

Richard L. Bidelspach has been 
reassigned to the Pentagon in Washington 
D.C. For the past two years he was senior 
civilian assistant to the Defense Attache, 
Republic of Vietnam, headquartered in 
Saigon. 

Harvey P. Jeffers. vice president and 
chief operating officer of Midland 
Research Corporation, Rochester, N.Y., 
was the main speaker for a two-day seminar 
for the Upper Hudson-Chamberlain Valley 
Society of Real Estate Appraisers. 

'54 

The Rev. William F. Bastian resigned as 
pastor of Dreisbach United Church of 
Christ and is now teaching world cultures 
and civics in Selinsgrove H.S. 

x'54 

DeWitt C. Reynolds is head of the Trust 
Department at Howard Savings Bank, 
New Jersey's largest bank. He lives in Fair- 
field. 

James R. Diemer is store manager for 
J.C. Penney, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

'55 

Bruce A. Bell was among outstanding 
personnel honored at a recent sales 
management conference at Port St. Lucie, 
Fla., for the Johnson & Johnson Baby 
Products Co. He won membership in the 
Ring Club for outstanding sales accom- 
plishment. The company's account 
manager in Philadelphia, he was last year 
elected to the Sales Hall of Fame for 
leadership in the trade and in the communi- 
ty. 

'57 

Arthur A. Zimmerman was promoted to 
assistant general auditor, raw materials and 
water transportation division, Accounting 
Department of Bethlehem Steel Corpora- 
tion. He advanced from assistant to general 
auditor in the same division. 

'59 

Joseph M. Barlow is an inventory 
management specialist, Naval Air Systems 
Command. He lives at 6207 Erman Ct., 
Burke, Va. 22015. 

Dr. Foster R. McCurley. who teaches 
Hebrew and Old Testament in the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 




Riegel '47 and Zimmerman '57 



appeared at Susquehanna in March 
assisting in the teaching of a seminar course 
on "Communicating the Gospel," offered 
by the Department of Religion. Foster's 
book, Proclaiming the Promise, was 
published by Fortress Press last fall. 

'61 

Dr. Marvin L. Brubaker, was advanced 
to associate professor of mathematics at 
Moravian College. Last year he was ap- 
pointed chairman of the department. 

Dr. Stephen T. Toy is now a cellular im- 
munologist in the E.I. duPont de Nemours 
Experimental Station, Wilmington, Del. 
He lives at 1648 Rolling Glen Dr., Booth- 
wyn. Pa. 19061. 

'62 

Leslie R. Butler was promoted to senior 
vice president. Consumer Finance Depart- 
ment of the First Pennsylvania Bank, 
Philadelphia. 

'63 

Lynn E. Lerew, band director for 
Chambersburg Area Sr. H.S., was elected 
director of the Hagerstown (Md.) Munici- 
pal Band. The band performs monthly but 
is best known for its Sunday night concerts 
in Hagerstown Municipal Park. 

David Hackenberg is among other alum- 
ni whose bands are performing for profes- 
sional football teams. His East Pennsboro 
H.S. Band played for the Baltimore Colts 
last fall. His co-director is Nate Ward '63 
and they are assisted by Richard Semke 
69. 

'64 

Robert G Silar has been elected 
secretary of Diller Plank Inc., construction 
firm in Lancaster, Pa. His wife is the former 
Pam Y eager '64 and they live at 1 15I Penn 
Grant Rd., Lancaster. 

'65 

The Rev. Ray E. Dice, formerly at Christ 
Lutheran Church, Pittsburgh, is now pastor 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



of Zion Lutheran Church, Hummelstown, 
Pa. He and his family live at 243 Lincoln 
St., Hummelstown, Pa. 17036. 

'67 

Barbara Mundy Hand and husband Jon 
x'64 are working for the Chateau D'Ville in 
Boston. Jon began a production of "Fiddler 
on the Roof in January and Barbara is 
doing "Cactus Flower" with Joan Fon- 
taine. 

Charles S. Bender joined the staff at 
Farmer & Merchants Trust Co., 
Chambersburg, Pa., specializing in the 
bank's lending function. 

Mary Drake Franco is living at Bishop 
Rd., Bedford, N.Y. 10506. Her husband is 
assistant controller of Westvaco and they 
have two children. 

Bernard J. Manner Jr. received the M.D. 
degree from the Medical School, Universi- 
ty of Rome, in 1973. He has a practice in 
Passaic, N.J. 

'68 

J. David Kelly Jr. is director of theatre 
arts and forensics at Hillsdale College. His 
wife, the former Judith Wittosch '69, is 
working toward the master's degree in 
English at the University of Michigan. 

Donald A . McBane is attending Germain 
School of Photography in New York City. 

The Rev. W. Dean Bickel has been 
promoted to pastor of The Good Shepherd 
Lutheran Church, Monroeville, Pa. 15146. 

x'68 

James T Frutchey received his B.S. in 
business administration from Temple 
University in 1 973 and is now a golf pro in 
an apprentice program. A Marine Corps 
veteran, he is married and lives at 418 S. 
Kings Ave., Apt. 2, Brandon, Fla. 33511. 



h'68 



Ron Berkheimer. longtime public infor- 
mation director at S.U., is now a salesman 
for Investors Diversified Services. He and 
his family live at R.D. 1, Port Trevorton, 
Pa. 

'69 

Jeffrey K. Turns, a sales representative in 
Philadelphia for Johnson & Johnson's 
Patient Care Division, was presented with 
membership in the Ring Club for outstand- 
ing sales achievement. He and his wife, the 
former E. Lynn McAllislerx'68. live at 151 
Millbridge Apts., Clementon, N.J. 

Robert H. Pritchard is with the Peace 
Corps in Poland. 

Edward H. Vermillion has been admitted 
to practice law in Pennsylvania. He is 
associated with the firm of Shutack, 
Lavelle& Lavelle in Lehighton, Pa. 18235. 




The 15th and 10th reunion classes. 



Charles A. Bolig earned his Ph.D. in 
physics from Arizona State University. He 
and his wife are living in Schenectady, 
N.Y., where he is associated with Knowels 
Atomic Power Laboratories training U.S. 
Navy personnel in the function of nuclear 
reactors on ships and submarines. 

Fred H Hart is manager of Executive 
Books, Carlisle, Pa., a division of Life 
Management Services Inc. His address is 
R.D. 9, Box 702, Carlisle, Pa. 

Dr. Heister H Linn is practicing den- 
tistry part-time and is a full-time graduate 
student in orthodontics at Temple Univer- 
sity. He lives at 8117 Forrest Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19150. 

Linda Henshel Paulin has joined Merck 
& Co. as an associate marketing analyst. 
She and her husband live at 1405 Hunter 
La., West Chester, Pa. 19380. 

'70 

Loreen S. Wimmer is coordinator of adult 
education at Lehigh County Community 
College in Schnecksville, Pa. She is living at 
21 E. Ettwein St., Bethlehem, Pa. 18018. 

John C Fickes received his M.S. in 
counseling from Shippensburg State 
College. His address is 22 Cedar Cliff Dr., 
Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 



Bruce W. Ficken received the J.D. degree 
from Dickinson School of Law, graduating 
first in his class in 1973. He is an attorney 
with Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz, Phila- 
delphia. 

Linda Ann Matthes Kraus and her hus- 
band, William G., are returning to the U.S. 
this spring from the Philippines, where Lt. 
Kraus has been stationed at Clark AFB. 
While in the Philippines, Linda did some 
substitute teaching in the dependents' 
schools. The family visited Hong Kong and 
Bangkok and wrote Dr. Armstrong that it 
was like walking inside the pages of a copy 
of the National Geographic, only better! 
On their return, they are scheduled for 
Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, where the 
captain-to-be will be attending the Air 
Force Institute of Technology. 

Alan F. Pawlenok has been appointed 
financial aid director at College Misericor- 
dia, Scranton, Pa. 

John E Bolton III is a sales represen- 
tative for Music Corporation of America, 
Los Angeles. He lives at 18347 Collins St., 
Apt. 30, Tarzana, Calif. 91356. 

'71 

Mark L. Stevens is a guidance counselor 
at Orange Park (Fla.) Middle School and is 



SPRING 1975 



19 



working on a specialist degree in counseling 
rehabilitation at Florida State. His wife, 
the former Marilyn Lacko '73, is working 
on a master's degree in botany-ecology and 
is doing her research on a Federal grant. 
They live at 15 Colonial Cir., Ormond 
Beach, Fla. 32074. 

Patricia Rauh Schroeder was appointed 
the State of Maine's first affirmative action 
officer by Gov. James B. Longley. She is 
responsible for Maine's affirmative action 
plan and monitors state departments to en- 
sure that they follow equal opportunity 
guidelines in hiring. Her husband is Peter B. 
Schroeder '70. 

John W. Ruhl received his D.D.S. from 
Temple University School of Dentistry and 
is now practicing in a partnership in 
Miffiinburg, Pa. His wife is the former 
Georgeann Mercineavage '73. They live at 
838 Chestnut St., Miffiinburg, Pa. 

Kenneth J. Vermillion also earned his 
D.D.S. from Temple and is practicing with 
his father and brother, Lou '70, in Summit 
Hill, Pa. Ken is married to the former Rox- 
ane Havice '71 and they live at 246 W. 
White., Summit Hill, Pa. 18250 

Whitney A. Gay hasjoined the sales staff 
of A & A-Cresca, importers and dis- 
tributors of gourmet foods. He covers the 
New England area. 

Ronald C Waters is a supervisor in 
mortgage and real estate accounting with 
the Connecticut General Life Insurance 
Corp. His wife, the former Susan Wollz 
'73. is a group insurance contract analyst 
with the same firm. Their address is 4 
Pioneer Dr., Ellington, Ct. 06029. 

H Wayne Griesl was promoted to 
manager of the Fidelity Bank's Lionville of- 
fice, Exton, Pa. 

'72 

William W. Them is a partner in Jackson 
Realty & Mobile Homes Inc., Wysox, Pa. 



He is married to the former Linda Munroe 
'74. 

Carl C. Yingling passed his CPA ex- 
amination in Maryland. Last December he 
was honored to receive the outstanding 
auditor-trainee-of-the-year award for the 
Philadelphia region of the Defense Con- 
tract Audit Agency. Department of De- 
fense. He is now with the agency's Alaskan 
subofficein Anchorage. He and his wife live 
at 7330 Tanaga Cir., Apt. 2, Anchorage, 
Alaska 99504. 

Becky Frit: Garrison is a school social 
worker. Central Susquehanna Intermedi- 
ate Unit 6. Lewisburg, Pa. She is taking 
part-time graduate work in elementary 
guidance at Marywood College. Her ad- 
dress is 1110 Avenue F, Riverside. Pa. 
17868. 



73 



John C. Foltz joined the U.S. Coast 
Guard in 1974 and is with the Coast Guard 
Band in the percussion section. His address 
is 46 Alger PI., New London, Ct. 06320. 

Kalhy Kennedy is living in Penn Town- 
ship, Pa., and is serving as a biology lab 
assistant at Bucknell University. 

Douglas Schultz is in management with 
Service Master Hospital Service Inc. His 
address is 401 S. Main St., Blandon, Pa. 
19510. 

Deborah Siegfried is a program analyst 
for the Federal Energy Commission. She 
lives at 2208 Wyoming Ave. N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20008. 

Bruce A. Rogers, who has taken the 
professional name of Bo Tomlyn, was the 
subject of a feature article in The Reporter 
Dispatch, White Plains, N.Y. He is rapidly 
making himself known as a popular writer 
of "sweet rock" music. 

Samuel J. Greco is with the Pennsylvania 
Personal Income Tax Bureau in Harris- 
burg. 



'74 

Christine A. Schuck is a counselor of 
emotionally handicapped children at the 
Lutheran Children's Home of the South. 
Her address is P.O. Box 151, Salem, Va. 
24153. 

Spencer G. Pope 111 is a job placement 
counselor with United Cerebral Palsy, 
Pottsville, Pa. 

Jocelyn A. Ftoody successfully com- 
pleted the eight-week Entree Program at 
the Katharine Gibbs School. She is with 
RKO General Inc., New York City. 

Vicky F. Rohm is teaching English at 
Pine Grove H.S. Her address is Box 73, 
Pine Grove, Pa. 17963. 

Karen Cherringlon Robbins is doing 
graduate work in college student develop- 
ment at George Washington University. 

Waller Breuninger is a carpenter with 
Berger Acoustical Co., Berwyn, and lives at 
1 Park La., Feasterville, Pa. 19047. 

Vicki Metz is a caseworker in charge of 
Family Day Care Homes for the Mifflin 
County Day Care and Child Development 
Center, Lewistown, Pa. 

Thomas P Bewley is in the computer 
programming department of the Snyder 
County Trust Co., Selinsgrove. 

Michael W. LaBant Jr. is a business 
analyst for Dun & Bradstreet Inc., 
Harrisburg. He also is a part-time hor- 
ticulture consultant for Bryfogle's Nursery 
in Muncy, Pa. 

Shelly A. Gehman is office manager for 
J. Appleseed Inc., Shamokin Dam, Pa. 

x'74 

Georginna R Huston received her B.S. 
in music from West Chester State College. 

David M. Miele is general manager of 
the Lycoming Hotel-Motel, Williamsport. 
Pa. 




On Alumni Weekend, the Senior class poses, too. 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




DR C. WILLARD SMITH, professor emeritus of English at Bucknell University is 
conferred with the honorary Doctor of Pedagogy by President Weber as Marshal 
Howard DeMott adjusts his hood. Holder of three degrees from Princeton, the 
professor joined the Bucknell faculty in 1924. retired in 1969. and then spent 
jive vears as part-time visiting professor at Susquehanna. A gifted teacher of 
literature, he was cited for making education a vital experience for thousands oj 
students and for his "unstinting loyalty to the highest standards of leaching." 
He is one of four persons receiving honorary degrees at SU's May 31 Commencement. 



"J BO" 



ASKEW-GALLAGHER 
Kathleen Gallagher x' 59 to Richard R. 
Askew, August 10, 1972. Kathy earned an 
M.A. in education and behavioral sciences 
from Kean College and an M.A. in child 
development from Fairleigh Dickinson. 
She is doing postgraduate work at 
Montclair State College and is an elemen- 
tary teacher in River Vale, N.J. / 38 Not- 
tingham Ct., Montvale, N.J. 07645. 
KL1NGER-TRESSELT 
Drusilla Tresselt to Raymond W. 
Klinger '66, August 25, 1973. Mrs. Klinger 
graduated from Western Maryland College 
and is a social worker with the Carroll 
County Department of Social Services, 
Westminster, Md. Ray received the M.S. 
from Bucknell University and has done 
work toward the Ph.D. at Penn State 
University. He is associated with his father- 
in-law in a goldfish hatchery. / 21 Carroll 
St., Thurmont, Md. 21788. 

RANKIN-DAVIS 
Sally A. Davis '68 to David E. Rankin, 
August 25, 1973, Forty Fort (Pa.) Presby- 
terian Church. Sally is an elementary vocal 



music teacher in the Cumberland Valley 
school district, where her husband, a 
graduate of Muskingum College, also 
teaches. / R.D. 5, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
17055. 

CLOUD-BUCKINGHAM 

Gail L. Buckingham '70 to Robert F. 
Cloud '72, November 24, 1973, First 
Presbyterian Church, Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Bob is attending Widener College. / 1118 
Lafayette Ave., Apt. 208, Prospect Park, 
Pa. 19076. 

HOFFMANN-WALSH 

Kathleen M. Walsh to John H. Hoff- 
mann '74, March 16, 1974, St. Joseph's 
Roman Catholic Church, East Rutherford, 
N.J. Kenneth Heslop '75 served as an usher. 
Mrs. Hoffmann is a graduate of William 
Paterson College and an 8th grade teacher 
at West Brook Jr. H.S., Paramus, N.J. 
John is the New York City office of Price 
Waterhouse & Co. 

CARLINI-WILLIAMS 

Wendy Williams '74 to Michael D. 
Carlini '74, April 6, 1974, Nevil Memorial 
Church of St. George, Ardmore, Pa. Wen- 
dy is a counselor at the Elwyn Institute and 
Mike is a staff accountant for Price Water- 
house & Co. in Philadelphia. / 30 E. Jeffer- 
son St., Apt. 303-A Gayley Apts., Media, 



Pa. 19063. 

LINDER-SEDLER 

Alice Crane Sedler to Richard E. Under 
'65, April 13, 1974, at the home of the 
bridegroom's parents, Paoli, Pa. Mrs. 
Linder is a graduate of Allegheny College 
with a master's degree from Smith College. 
She is a social worker at the Thomas Jeffer- 
son University Developmental Disability 
Mental Health Center, Philadelphia. Rich 
is a stockbroker at Paine, Webber, Jackson 
& Curtis Inc., Philadelphia. / Ardmore 
Commons 5, 1 16 Ardmore Ave., Ardmore, 
Pa. 19003. 

MENDES-KORPER 

Juliann Korper '70 to Jeronimo Mendes, 
September 28, 1974, Zion Lutheran 
Church, Sunbury, Pa. Julie is working in a 
gourmet shop and doing free-lance French 
translation. Mr. Mendes, formerly of Por- 
tugal, is in the credit office of Eastman 
Kodak Co. / 23 Whitehouse Dr., Apt. 4, 
Rochester, N.Y. 14616. 

MORROW-FOSSELMAN 

Frances R. Fosselman to Frederick E. 
Morrow '73, fall 1974, on the front lawn of 
the farm of the bridegroom's parents, Atty. 
and Mrs. William S Morrow '34, New 
Bloomfield, Pa. Douglas Hauser '73 was 
best man and Lewis Morrow '78 was one of 
the ushers. Mrs. Morrow, a graduate of 
Millersville State College, is a teacher at 
Halifax H.S. Fred is a salesman for Rolling 
Acres Real Estate Inc., Newport. / R.D. 1, 
New Bloomfield, Pa. 17068. 

COLE-HOFFMAN 

Christine Hoffman '71 to Rick Cole, fall 
1974, Valley Forge Freedoms Foundation 
Chapel. Mr. Cole is a graduate of Penn- 
sylvania State University where he also 
received the master's degree. / 3 14 Vine St., 
Lansdale, Pa. 19446. 

GRENIER-vanLIER 

Gail M. vanLier '73 to Francis E. 
Grenier Jr., November 30, 1974, The Rye 
Town Hilton Inn, N.Y. Mr. Grenier served 
two years in the U.S. Army and is an elec- 
trician in Fairfax, Va., where the couple 
lives. 

GOFF-CAVE 

Linda S. Cave x'72 to Gary B. Goff, 
December 7, 1974, Emanuel Baptist 
Church, Ridgewood, N.J. Linda is an 
orthodontist assistant and technician. Mr. 
Goff, a graduate of Ramapo College, is a 
representative for Proctor & Gamble, 
Newport News. Va. 

PIVARNIK-MAHONEY 

Diane P. Mahoney '74 to John M. Pivar- 
nik '73, December 8, 1974, Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, Florham Park, N.J. 
Diane is director of music at the church. 
John completed a year of study at Cologne 
Academy for Music in Germany. He gives 

continued on page 24 



SPRING 1975 



21 



A COMMON DILEMMA these days is that of the liberal 
arts major who can't find a job in his field after graduating 
from college. It's too bad a solution to this problem is not 
always as easy as it was for Susquehanna English major Don 
Ernst '74 of Selinsgrove. 

During the first few months after his graduation last 
May Don ran into several dead ends in his search for a writing 
or editing job with a newspaper or book publishing firm, and 
acquired a distaste for the one job he could find as a factory 
worker. Having failed at finding employment suitable for a 
lover of books and disliking the alternatives, Don went to 
work for himself by opening his own "Old Book Store," 
Selinsgrove's newest business establishment located at 27 
Market St. in the former home of the Cobbler's Bench shoe 
store. 

This enterprising move was easier for Don than it would 
be for most English majors one year out of college, however. 
He had a pretty good head start on setting up a book store 
since his father, Don Ernst Sr., has been a rare book collector 
and mail order book dealer for the past 13 years. A retired 
Weis Markets district manager, Ernst Sr. has accumulated 
about 4000 books while pursuing his hobby. He began by 
buying a warehouse full of books and he replenishes his stock 
at auctions and garage and attic sales. He conducts a "search 
service," trying to locate specific books requested by 
customers, and utilizes the periodical Antiquarian Bookman 
publications where dealers' wares and customers' needs are 
advertised. The Ernst family, living amidst so many books, 
had often discussed the possibility of opening up a book shop 
and with Don's availability for the proprietor's role the idea 
became a reality in February. 

So far business has been good, even better than the 
Ernsts expected. "It's a better situation than I ever thought 
I'd get into," says Don. The best customer, he says, has been a 
man from Maryland who travels through Selinsgrove regu- 
larly on business. The man said he was interested in law and 
wanted to build up a library and write a book on con- 
stitutional law. He stopped in twice and spent a total of $500. 
"He bought a lot of old law books that we never thought we'd 
be able to sell," Don relates. 

The contents of the shop are varied. Books range from 
rare 1 6th and 1 7th century collector's items selling for $50 to 
copies of "dime store" novels, to sports, adventure, romance 
and science fiction stories of more recent past decades, selling 
for 50 cents. Most of the items are priced between these ex- 
tremes at a few dollars. These run the gamut from scarce old 
editions of timeless classics of literature, history and science 
in individual volumes or collections to century-old guide 
books, almanacs and atlases which are more interesting today 
as relics in themselves than as sources of accurate informa- 
tion. 

The nature of the customers is as varied as the inventory. 
The shop attracts university professors searching for a scho- 
larly work now out of print, such as S.U. English instructor 
Ron Dotterer who paid $2 for a 1930s commentary on 



BOOKS, 




22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



used and rare 



ill I 





Coleridge; avid readers seeking some obscure novel of the 
1940s; Amish folk wanting one of the Ernsts' many books in 
German and Pennsylvania Dutch printed in central Penn- 
sylvania in the 19th century; a collector or another book 
dealer looking for a scarce volume; or an antique lover in- 
terested in old books just for the appearance of the thick, 
gold-inlaid leather bindings. 

Don says that he and his father are able to locate about 
80 percent of the books requested by customers through the 
search service. Don has some regular customers who are in- 
terested in any book on a particular subject. These pet topics 
include freemasonry, trolleys, and Roy Rogers and Dale 
Evans. 

Among the more interesting scarce books in the shop are 
The Sermons of Maihew Mead, in German, printed in 
"Selins Grove" in 1830; some Mark Twain first editions; a 
collection of The Spectator, a daily commentary originally 
written in 1712 and collectively published in London in 1724; 
a first edition of Snyder County Pioneers autographed by 
author Dr. Charles A. Fisher; and a collection of Luther's 
works, one of the first books printed in the state of Penn- 
sylvania, published in Germantown in 1793. The rarest 
volumes, however, are not kept in the shop but in the Ernsts' 
home, such as a copy of the New England Primer, the first 
book printed in this country, dating back to the 1600s. The 
shop's capacity is about 2500 volumes, only 60 percent of the 
total Ernst collection. 

The hardest aspect of running the shop, according to 
Don, is pricing the old books. It takes a lot of knowledge and 
experience to be able to pick out the truly rare volume from 
the merely old one. Don notes that he has one advantage his 
father did not have. "He started out cold; I have him to teach 
me," Don says. One thing that enhances the value of a book is 
illustrations, he says. In the past, the average book was more 
lavishly endowed with art work than at present, and the book 
illustrators of the past were often the most well known artists 
of their day. In fact, among Don's favorite items is a set of 
copper plate drawings from the 1600s which have been in- 
dividually mounted and framed, but were once in a book. 

The contents of the store are not limited to books. Don 
notes that purchase of boxes of books that someone has 
cleaned out of an attic often turns up such items as stamp 
collections and old photograph albums, which are also on sale 
at the shop when available. Some other features of the store 
were contributed by other members of the Ernst family. The 
former Sunny Ernst and her husband Joe Lauver, both of 
Susquehanna's class of '68, built the book shelves as well as 
some small benches and wood sculptures which are for sale. 
The Ernsts are definitely an S.U. family. All four children 
attended Susquehanna, and their mother Peg has been 
secretary in the Alumni Office since 1959. 

And Don, the lover of books "used and rare," from 
frustration and disappointment is forging a fascinating career 
he wasn't even contemplating a year ago. A sign in the win- 
dow says "Come in and browse." 

3 — P.S. 



SPRING 1975 



23 



"I DO" 

continued from page 21 

piano lessons and assists with the choirs and 
organ at Calvary. / 1 1 Front St., Chatham, 
N.J. 07928. 

SPIELMAN-SCHALL 

Karen B. Schall to John E. Spielman III 
x'70, December 20, 1974, First Congre- 
gational Church, Sarasota, Fla. Mrs. 
Spielman graduated from Florida State 
University and teaches art at Brentwood 
School, Sarasota. John received the B.A. 
from Bucknell University and is teaching 
6th grade in the same school. / 630 Avenida 
de M ayo, Siesta Key, Sarasota, Fla. 3358 1 . 
COLESCOTT-BANTA 

Eileen Banta to Barry L. Colescott '74, 
December 21, 1974, Forty Fort (Pa.) 
United Methodist Church. Mrs. Colescott 
is a graduate of Lock Haven State College 
and is elementary school librarian for the 
Shikellamy school district. Barry com- 
pleted the requirements for a broker's 
license and is a real estate broker at 
Colescott Real Estate in Sunbury. / 202 N. 
Fourth St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 
MARTZ-HOPPLE 

Cynthia Hopple to Don E. Martz '73, 
December 21, 1974, Emmanuel Bible 
Fellowship Church, Sunbury. Mrs. Martz, 
a graduate of Lock Haven State College, is 
a health and physical education instructor 
at Shikellamy H.S. Don is a partner with 
his father in Martz's Game Farms, Sun- 
bury. / R.D. 1, Box 85, Dalmatia, Pa. 
17017. 

WECK-VAIL 

Jane C. Vail '70 to James M. Week, 
December 21, 1974, Claremont (Calif.) 
Friends Meeting. Jane is a former VISTA 
volunteer in North Carolina. Mr. Week is 
an auto parts counterman and shift man- 
ager at G & H Auto Parts, Alhambra. / 78 1 
Termino Ave., Apt. B, Long Beach, Calif. 
90804. 

HIPPLE-GILLILAN 

Cheryl K. Gillilan to the Rev. Elwood B. 
Hippie Jr. '63, December 29, 1974. Mrs. 
Hippie, a graduate of Kearney State Col- 
lege in Nebraska, is a teacher for the Sandy 
Creek school system, Glenvil, Neb. and 
Elwood is pastor of the Sutton-Saronville 
Lutheran Parish. 

PETRE-CONKLIN 

Lynn Conklin to Lt. Patrick A. Petre '74, 
January 1975, Army War College Memo- 
rial Chapel, Carlisle, Pa. Mrs. Petre is a 
graduate of Kutztown State College and 
Pat is with the U.S. Marine Corps stationed 
at Quantico, Va. 

NAUGLE-KEISER 

Mary L. Keiser x' 76 to Ray M. Naugle, 
January 25, 1975, Trinity Lutheran 



Church, Milton, Pa. The Rev. Waller L. 
Brandau '51 performed the ceremony. 
Mary Louise is with Weis Markets, Milton. 
The groom served with the U.S. Marine 
Corps and is manager of Weis Markets, 
Mifilinburg. / 916 Chestnut St., Mifflin- 
burg, Pa. 17844. 

HUNT-ALBRIGHT 

Juniata Albright '75 to Geoffrey B Hunt 
'74, March I, 1975, Mannsville Lutheran 
Church, New Bloomfield, Pa. Juniata is a 
saleswoman for the Florida Real Estate 
Corp. Geoffrey is a foreman at Abex Corp. 
/ 258 E. Lake St., Apt. GE, Bloomingdale, 
111. 60108. 

KLEMENTOVICH-HERSHEY 

Sharon R. Hershey '71 to Joseph A. 
Klemenlovich '74, March 15, 1975, 
Meditation Chapel, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity. The ceremony was performed by 
Chaplain Edgar S. Brown. / 294 Academy 
St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18701. 

DUNN-DALRYMPLE 

Barbara P. Dalrymple '74 to David S. 
Dunn '72, April 12, 1975, Wayne (Pa.) 
United Methodist Church. Susan Haines 
Casso '74, Bruce Casso '74 and Jeffrey 
Winter '72 were attendants. Barb is training 
supervisor (personnel) for Liberty Mutual 
Insurance Co. and Dave is a production 
planner for GTE Sylvania, both in 
Williamsport. / 1413'/2 West Fourth St., 
Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 

WEIDNER-SHIPTON 

Judith A. Shipton '74 to Leo Weidner, 
April 26, 1975. Judy is secretary at 
Yorktowne Kitchens, Mifflinburg. Her 
husband, a graduate of Penn State Univer- 
sity, is teaching in the Honesdale (Pa.) 
Elementary School. / 809 Market St., 
Mifflinburg. Pa. 17844. 

HARRIS-BROCKWAY 

Martha J. Brockway '71 to Craig Harris, 
May 17, 1975, Messiah Lutheran Church, 
South Williamsport, Pa. The Rev. Boyd 
Gibson, assistant professor of religion at 
S.U., co-officiated at the ceremony and 
Louise Hiller '71 was maid of honor. Marty 
is a counselor/therapist for drug addicts 
and alcoholics at White Deer Run, 
Allenwood, Pa. The groom is an attorney in 
Williamsport. / 1114 Mulberry St., 
Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 

McHENRY-TAMKE 

Marsha M. Tamke '68 to John Jay 
McHenry, May 24, 1975, in the spring 
house garden of the bride's home, Rana 
Villa in Camp Hill, Pa. She is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. George R. F. Tamke h'67 
and a free-lance illustrator. Mr. McHenry 
is the brother of Irene McHenry Mitchell 
'67. A silversmith, he attended Madison 
College, HACC, and the York Academy. / 
3521 Hartzdale Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 



Born Crusaders 

To the Rev. J. Allen '57 and Nancy 
Zimmerman Roshon '59, their third 
daughter. Heather Dawn, August 1 1, 1970. 
Al, since last fall Lutheran chaplain to the 
U niversity of Manitoba, is working toward 
the S.T.M. at the University of Winnipeg. 
He formerly served pastorates in Lundar, 
Beausejour and Winnipeg, and in 1973 was 
a delegate to the World Peace Congress in 
Moscow. Nancy earned a B.Ed, in devel- 
opmental education from the University of 
Manitoba and is teaching children with 
learning disabilities at Springfield Heights 
School. Winnipeg. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Donald Glaser Jr. '68, 
their first child, a son, David Hamilton, 
August 26, 1973. Don is a residential real 
estate broker for the third largest realtor in 
Denver, Perry & Butler Inc. / 7560 So. 
Ulster PI., Englewood, Colo. 80110. 

To Robert J. '65 and Janet Walling 
Scovell '67, their second daughter, Susan 
Walling, October 8, 1973. Bob is a private 
law practitioner in the Wilkes-Barre area. / 
Box 401, R.D. 4, Shavertown, Pa. 18708. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James R. Reaser '68, 
their second child, a son, Michael Bradley, 
January 1, 1974. Sister Amy was 5 years old 
on April 10. Jim is choral director at 
Shikellamy H.S. and organist-choir direc- 
tor for Christ Lutheran Church, Milton. / 
Mahoning Manor, R.D. 1. Milton, Pa. 
17847. 

To Holland E. x'74 and Sylvia 
Montgomery Shaw x'72, their first child, a 
son. Gabriel Holland, July 8, 1974. / 
Singletary Ave., Sutton, Mass. 91527. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William R. Brower 
x'68, their third child and first son, Todd 
William, July 27, 1974. Bill is cost account- 
ing supervisor for C-E Minerals in King of 
Prussia and recently earned his real estate 
license. He is associated with Frank H. 
Stout, Realtor. Broomall. / 1 1 7 First Ave., 
Broomall, Pa. 19008. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Forse '68, a 
son, William Robert, September 16, 1974. 
Bob is assistant cashier. The First National 
Bank of Eastern Pennsylvania, Blooms- 
burg. / R.D. 1, Box 245-B, Catawissa, Pa. 
17820. 

To Ronald M. and Donna Garver Henry 
'67, their first child, a son, Christian 
Garver. October 16, 1974. / 7048 
Kingswood Ct. 2702, Indianapolis, Ind. 
46256. 

To Richard M. and Cynthia Culp Fad 
'67, their second child, a daughter, Regan 
Darby, October 17, 1974. Regan's brother, 
Richard Matthew Jr., was born November 
6. 1973. / R.D. 1. Schwenksville. Pa. 
19473. 



24 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



To Alexander A Jr. '69 and Karen 
Geiger Nash '68, their first child, a son, 
Gregory Alexander, November 13, 1974. / 
104 Helen St., Fanwood, N.J. 07023. 

To Richard E. x'68 and Ellen Rogers 
Mearns '68, their second child, Melissa 
Ellen, November 15, 1974./421 Woodland 
Ave., Morrisville, Pa. 19067. 

To James E. andSandra Bahn Gingerich 
'70, their first child, a son, Jeffrey Edward, 
November 24, 1974. / 7 Slate Ridge Dr., 
York, Pa. 17404. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Pratt '72, a 
son, Andrew John, December 1974. Bob is 
completing his second year at the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest 
University, and after graduation plans to 
return to the Central Pennsylvania area. / 
1430 Chelsea St., Winston-Salem, N.C. 
27103. 

To Bruce T. and Lois Kohl Badgley '59, 
their first child, a daughter, Julia 
(Catherine, December 9, 1974. / 3 17 Second 
Ave., Bradley Beach, N.J. 07720. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gary W. Metza '69, 
their first child, a daughter, Jennifer Ann, 
December 9, 1974. Gary is a 6th grade 
Latin American history teacher at Blue 
Mountain Middle School, Orwigsburg. / 
509 Schuylkill St., Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 
17972. 

To Lynn D. '73 and Dorothy Jones 
Zimmerman x '74, their second child, a son, 
Mathew Lynn, December 9, 1974. /R.D. 1, 
Tamaqua, Pa. 18252. 

To Atty. d Mrs. Terry R. Bossert '68, a 
daughter, December 12, 1974. / 420 Apple- 
tree Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. Ray E. Dice '65, 
their second child, a daughter, Karen 
Elizabeth, December 12, 1974. See Sus- 
quehannans On Parade. 

To Robert R. Jr. '67 and Carolyn Wahler 
Miller '67, their second child a son, Douglas 
Reed, December 24, 1974. Bob is director 
of high school bands on both campuses, 
Abington school district. His band per- 
formed in the Orange Bowl parade in 
Miami on New Year's Eve. / 3215 Wood- 
land Rd., Dresher, Pa. 19025. 

To Leo E. and Mary Wealherlow Shelley 
'63, their second child, a daughter, Sarah 
Virginia, December 28, 1974. / 225 Red- 
wood Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 17603. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. Gerald Carothers 
'70, their second daughter, Laura Beth, 
December 29, 1974. / 221 Richfield Rd., 
Upper Darby, Pa. 19082. 

To Jack and Carol Wentzel Felix '66, a 
daughter, Swatara Lyn, January 3, 1975. 
Swatara has a brother Brian, age 5. / 43 So. 
11th St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Bowen '65, 
their second child, a daughter, Nicole 
Danielle, January 6, 1975. Art, who owns 




A HANDSOME bronze medal mounted on an oiled walnut shield, crafted 
by the Medallic An Company which produces Susquehanna's own alumni medals, 
was presented to the Student Volunteer Program, winner of the Northumberland 
County Medical Society's Benjamin Rush Award, on May 7. /( was received 
on behalf of the University by Susan M. Horr '75 of Moorestown, N.J., last 
year's program coordinator, in recognition of outstanding contributions 
to the health and welfare of the people of the area. It was also announced 
that the Pennsylvania Medical Society will honor Susquehanna with its Rush 
Award for the finest volunteer program in the Commonwealth at special 
ceremonies in October. Nancy K. Musser '76 of State College, Pa., the 
current coordinator, will accept this presentation. The SV program is unique 
in that 25-40 percent of the students participate in a wide variety of 
services to the elderly, the handicapped, children, and others in need. 



and operates the Bowen Agency Realtors 
with his brother, Bill '69, successfully com- 
pleted courses of the Pennsylvania Realtors 
Institute and has earned the designation 
G.R.I. / R.D. 1, Monroe Manor, Selins- 
grove. Pa. 17870. 

To Erik P. '69 and Trixanna Weber Van 



Anglen '68, their first child, a daughter, 
Carly, January 21, 1975. For the past 
several years Erik has been self-employed. 
His firm, Green Country Landscaping, 
headquartered in Harleysville, Pa., pri- 
marily does landscape designing and plan- 
ting in Pennsylvania and surrounding 



SPRING 1975 



25 



slates. / 503 Walnut St., Jenkintown, Pa. 
19046. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Veach '73, a 
son, Robert Stephen, January 21, 1975. 
Bob received the certificate for physical 
therapy from the University of Penn- 
sylvania and passed the state examination 
for P.T. licensure. He is a physical 
therapist at the VVilliamsport Rehabilita- 
tion Center. / 250 Liberty St., Apt. 3, Dan- 
ville, Pa. 17821. 

To J. Dean and Donna Ake Burkholder 
'67, their first child, a daughter, Joe Dara, 
January 26, 1975. Donna has taken a vaca- 
tion from teaching. Father is director of the 
Council of Planning Affiliates for Human 
Services in Lancaster County. / 212 Irene 
Ave.. Ephrata, Pa. 17522. 

To Edward A. and Lynda Dries Strecker 
'63, their third son, Stephen Michael, 
January 29, 1975. / 835 So. Country Rd.. 
East Patchogue, N.Y. 11772. 

To Thomas N. '73 and Virginia Munson 
Vultee x'73, a son, Adam Todd, January 
29, 1975. Tom is assistant manager of the 
Medi Mart Store, a division of Stop & 
Shop. Hillsdale, N.J. / 53 Christopher St., 
Montclair, N.J. 07042. 

To Rudolf J. V. and Carol Viertel Beran 
'66, a son, Rudolf Karl Francis, January 31, 
1975. Carol teaches part-time in the 
English Department at the University of 
California, Berkeley, where Mr. Beran is an 
associate professor of statistics. / 4412 
Weeping Spruce Ct., Concord, Calif. 
94521. 

To Robert J. '68 and Margaret Heil King 
'69, their second son, Randall Steele, 
February 2, 1975. Bob teaches and heads 
the Biology and Physics Department at 
East Juniata H.S. / Shade Rd., McAlister- 
ville, Pa. 17049. 

To Paul W. and Gail Spory McPherson 
'67, their second child, a son, Hugh Clark, 
February 2, 1975. Mr. McPherson was 
recently elected first vice president of the 
National Peach Council. / Maple Lawn 
Farms, New Park, Pa. 17352. 

To James L. and Joyce Lundy Rhodes 
'63, a son, Michael Russell, February 6, 
1975. Father is an accountant with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. / Apt. 
10, 4779 West Braddock Rd., Alexandria, 
Va. 22311. 

To John H. Ill and Linda Kauffman Kir- 
by '67, their second child, a daughter, 
Jessica Lynn, February 10, 1975. Jessica's 
brother, Joshua Ethan, was born July 1, 
1973. Linda has taught junior high English 
at Boyertown, where her husband teaches 
junior high special education. / 533 
Montgomery Ave., R.D. I, Boyertown, Pa. 
19512. 

To Wayne T. mi Joanne Romano Lucas 
'68, their first child, a daughter, Suzanne 
Lyn, February 13, 1975. Joanne has taught 




MARGE DuVAL '76 of Montclair, N.J. (second from right) talks with President 
Gerald Ford at a White House reception on April 15 for the National 
Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year. A sociology 
major, she is the newly-elected national president of the Intercollegiate 
Association of Women Students representing more than 200.000 U.S. college 
women. Others in the picture are William J. Baroody Jr., assistant to the 
president, and Paula Gibson of Gonzaga University, a member of the Commission. 



Spanish at Pomona Jr. H.S., Suffern, 
N.Y., where father teaches mathematics. / 
40 Ackerman Ave., Ramsey, N.J. 07446. 

To David E. and Lana Shaffer Herrold 
x'7l, their second son, Nathan Edward, 
February 17, 1975. / R.D. 2, Port Trevor- 
ton, Pa. 17864. 

To Atty. and Mrs. James W. Knepp '67, 
their first child, a daughter, Alison 
Elizabeth. February 20, 1975. / 22 No. 
Market St., Apt. 22-C, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

To the Rev. David A. '69 and Barbara 
Griesbacher Genszler '66, their third son, 
John William, March 14, 1975. / 1 7 Church 
St., Shiloh, Ohio 44878. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edgar W. Clark '73, 
their second child, a daughter, Dannielle 
Paula, March 14, 1975. Ed is in the 
appliance sales department of Montgomery 
Ward. Sunbury. / 310 No. High St.. 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. Richard J. Moore 
'67, a daughter, Sarah Anne. March 28, 
1975. Dick is pastor of the United 
Presbyterian Church, Cedar Grove, N.J. 
07009. 

To John F. '65 and Carole Sloan Grebe 
'67, their second daughter, Renee Lynn, 
April 4. 1975. / 2023 Hemlock Rd., 
Norristown, Pa. 19401. 



Deaths 



Thomas H. Dixon '29, East Liverpool, 
Ohio, April 2, 1969. Originally a teacher- 
coach and then a military veteran, he was 
principal of the Westgate School in East 
Liverpool. 

Walter Tkaczyk '54, Atlas, Pa., April 
1973. He was a research scientist in New 
York. 

Roy F. Kraber '32, Lansdowne, Pa., 
March 1974. In 1917-1958 he was head of 
the business educational department of 
Lansdowne- Alden H.S. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian Church and secretary of 
the Masonic lodge. 

Andrew A. Clark, Jr. '40. Mechanics- 
burg, Pa., May 1, 1974. He also studied at 
Dickinson College and Penn State Univer- 
sity and was with the U.S. Government at 
the Navy Ships Parts Control Center, 
Mechanicsburg. 

Russell I Sprout '32. Williamsport, Pa., 
July 30. 1974. He was a metallorgraphist 
and chemist for Bethlehem Steel. He was a 
member of St. Mark's Lutheran Church. 

Graham Rychards x'64. Jackson 
Heights, N.Y., November 20, 1974. 

The Rev. Dr. Russell F. Sleininger '21 . 
Butler, Pa.. November 25. 1974. He also 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



graduated from S.U. Academy and from 
the Seminary in 1924. He earned the M.A. 
and Ph.D. from the University of 
Pittsburgh. A veteran of World War I, he 
served Pennsylvania pastorates at Pitcairn- 
Trafford, Pittsburgh, Monessen, and 
Butler. Dr. Steininger was the first director 
of Camp Lutherlyn near Prospect, Pa., and 
was a leader in its development. Sus- 
quehannans among his survivors are his 
widow, the former Ruth Bond '24; sisters 
Hulda Steininger '19, wife of William A. 
Bowser '25; Vesta Steininger Cook '28: and 
Madeline Steininger x'34. wife of William 
S. Herman '31. 

Hubert C. Koch x 30. State College, Pa., 
December 24, 1974. A graduate of the 
Eckels College of Mortuary Science, he 
was affiliated with his father in the Koch 
Funeral Home, State College. His mem- 
berships included St. Paul's United 
Methodist Church, Kiwanis, Alpha Fire 
Co., and State College H.S. Athletic 
Board. 

Christine Brown, December 31, 1974, 
from injuries received in an automobile ac- 
cident. She was the daughter of Susquehan- 
na Chaplain Edgar S. Brown Jr. 

George H. Earle III Esq. hc'35. 
Villanova, Pa., December 30, 1974. He was 
Governor of Pennsylvania, 1935-39. 

Roy A. DeLong Esq. '10. Northumber- 
land, Pa., January 3, 1975. He was a 
graduate of Bucknell University and Tem- 
ple University School of Law and practiced 
in Philadelphia. He was a member of St. 
John's Lutheran Church, Northumberland, 
and several Masonic orders. 

The Rev. Lester J. Kaufman '22. Irvona. 
Pa.. January 12, 1975. He received the B.D. 
from Susquehanna Seminary and the 
S.T.M. from Gettysburg. His pastorates, 
all in Pennsylvania, were at Pleasant Gap, 
Mount Pleasant, Glasgow, New Center- 
ville, Fayetteville, and Lilly-Gallitzin. He 
was a veteran of World War I and an Army 
chaplain in the Pacific in World War II. 
After retirement in 1962, he served as 
chaplain at the Lutheran Home for the 
Aged, York, Pa. 

Janet Secrist McPherson '44. New 
Bloomfield. Pa., January 22, 1975. A vocal 
music teacher at West Perry School, Green 
Park, she formerly conducted a private 
kindergarten. Active in civic and social af- 
fairs, she also was choir director and a 
soloist at the Keboch Methodist Church. 

Donald S. Wormley '30. Tarrytown, 
N.Y., January 24, 1975. He earned the 
master's degree at Bucknell University and 
taught and coached in Dallas. Pa. and Mat- 
tituck, N.Y. prior to joining the staff of Ir- 
vington (N.Y.) H.S. in 1938. Principal of 
the school for 15 years, he received several 
important honors for service to youth. He 



also was named Principal of the Year by 
WABC Radio in New York and the Ir- 
vington High School auditorium was 
named the Donald S. Wormley Theatre. He 
was a past president of Kiwanis and a 
trustee of Irvington Presbyterian Church. 
Among his survivors is sister Sara Jane 
Wormley Shaffer x '41 . A brother was the 
late Neal W. Wormley '25. 

Mary Margaret VonNeida x'15, 
Laurelton, Pa., January 25, 1975. She was 
an elementary teacher in Hartley Township 
and a member of Christ's United Lutheran 
Church, Hartleton. 

George A. Shetterly. Selinsgrove, Pa., 
January 27, 1975. He was the father of Joan 
Shetterly '59. 

Helen Ammerman Brown '29, Selins- 
grove, Pa., January 28, 1975. She did 
graduate work at Columbia and Bucknell 
universities and the Hartford Foundation, 
served as a missionary in China, and was a 
teacher in Freeburg and in Shamokin, Pa. 
She was a member of the Order of Eastern 
Star, Susquehanna University Women's 
Auxiliary, and St. Paul's United Church of 
Christ. 

William R. Burchfield, Montgomery, 
Pa., February 4, 1975. President and 
treasurer of J.C. Decker Inc., he was a 
member of the Susquehanna Board of 
Directors and active in church, civic and 
philanthropic endeavors. 

Marian Klinger Derrick '29. 
Wilmington, Del., February 6, 1975. She 
did graduate work at Penn State and the 
University of Colorado. She was a Latin 
and English teacher at various schools, in- 
cluding Richardson Park Jr. H.S., Wil- 
mington. She sent a number of her students 
to Susquehanna. A brother is Russell 
Klinger '29. 

Martha Von Neida Waterbury, Harris- 
burg, Pa., February 15, 1975. She was the 
wife of Dr. Kenneth B. Waterbury h'50. 

Gladys E. Rhys '35. Warrior Run, Pa., 
early 1975. She was a teacher and principal 
in Warrior Run Elementary and H .S. for 45 
years. She was active in professional and 
social groups and a member of the Welsh 
Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Kenneth H. BothwellJr. '54. March 
4, 1 975, as the result of an automobile acci- 
dent. Director of the Cooperative Center 
for Educational Development and Services 
and a member of the University of Dela- 
ware faculty, he held a master's degree 
from Rutgers University and the Ed.D. 
from the University of Georgia. He was 
preparing to assume the position of 
associate superintendent of the Wilkes 
County schools in Washington, Ga. 

David W. Stuempfle '22, Williamsport, 
Pa., March 12, 1975. He held a master's 
degree from Bucknell University and was at 



Williamsport H.S. for nearly 40 years, 
beginning as a science teacher and retiring 
as principal. He was active in a number of 
civic and humanitarian causes, was a 
sportsman and a chorister, and a leader in 
St. Paul's Lutheran Church. 

John C. Herrold Ac'96, Port Trevorton, 
Pa., March 14, 1975. At first a teacher and 
bookkeeper as well as a driver on the old 
Pennsylvania Canal, for 67 years he opera- 
ted a store south of Port Trevorton and 
retired three years ago. He was a lifelong 
member of St. John's United Methodist 
Church and served for many years as a 
teacher and superintendent of its Sunday 
school. Among his survivors are sons 
George W. '25. James M. '28. Dr. Lewis C. 
'30 and Dr. Warren C. '41; granddaughter 
Jane Herrold x'73. wife of Jeffrey Karver 
'72, and grandson George Herrold '71. 

R. Scott Shirley x'76, Riverton, N.J., 
March 23, 1975. He was with the Shirley 
Office Supply Co., Pennsauken, and a part- 
time student at Burlington County College. 

Benjamin F. Herman x'22, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., April 10, 1975. He began a teaching 
career at Grangers Hollow School, moved 
on to the Fisher School and then taught at 
Shamokin Dam Elementary School until 
his retirement in 1967. 




Raymond P. "Rip" Garman '30, Red 
Bank, N.J., April 28, 1975. Rip was a 
chemistry teacher in Red Bank H.S. and 
had earlier taught in Pennsylvania schools 
and been a pharmaceutical supplies 
salesman. A particularly active alumni 
leader, he was president of the Alumni 
Association at the time of the University's 
presidential search which brought Dr. 
Weber to Susquehanna in 1959. He was a 
member of Red Bank's First Presbyterian 
Church and a number of civic groups, and 
in 1967 was honored with S.U.'s Alumni 
Award for Service (above). 



SPRING 1975 



27 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



For Members and Their Immediate Families 
Present 



TReLaocI 



#*+* 



Call or write for free 
color hotel brochure 



[last 



CALL 



DELUXE 

8 Days - 7 Nights 
August 8-16, 1975 
Philadelphia Departure 

$ 389 

( + 15% Tax & Service) 

Per person-Double occupancy 

Single Supplement - $65.00 



^// 



■^ dine-dRocmd 
RestaciRCints 

a Air transportation - 254 seat Trans International Airlines, U.S. 

Certificated Supplemental Air Carrier, DC-8 Jet; Estimated 

Cost - $215; Land - $232.35; Charter Cost - $54,610 
f Ireland departure tax enacted September, 1974 not included in trip price. 
( Approximately $4.15 ■ subject to change ) 





YOUR TRIP INCLUDES: 

Round trip jet transportation to Ireland. Meals 
and beverages served aloft " Evening Departure 

Deluxe accommodations for 5 nights in Dublin at 
the Jurys Hotel or the Burlington Hotel (or similar) 
and 2 nights in Limerick (Shannon) at the Limerick 
Inn Hotel or Shannon Shamrock Inn (or similar) 

Continental breakfast daily in Limerick 

Dinner three evenings in Dublin - Dine-Around 
Plan - at Dublin's finest restaurants 

Special medieval banquet one evening in an 
Irish Castle in Limerick 

Exciting low-cost optional tours available 

All gratuities for chambermaids, bellboys 
and doormen 

All round trip transfers and luggage handling 
from airport to hotel 

Experienced escort and Hotel Hospitality Desk 

2.50 pounds dinner allowance (Dine-Around Restaurant Plan) 
• 'Alcoholic beverages available at a nominal charge 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Deposits are accepted on a First-Come, First -Served basis as space is lim- 
ited! Final payment is due 60 days prior to departure. New bookings are 
accepted any time prior to departure providing space is available. Reser- 
vations may not be considered confirmed until deposits are accepted by 
Arthurs Travel Center. Information will be sent to you four to six weeks 
after your deposit is received. Cancellation without penalty will be per- 
mitted if written request is received 60 days before departure. Cancella- 
tion after 60 days will be subject to an administrative charge of $25.00 per 
person and there will also be a charge for the pro rata air fare unless re- 
placement is made from a waiting list; however, the availability of such re- 
placement is not guaranteed. An Air Fare Refunder Policy is available and 
an application will be sent to you 4 to 6 weeks after your deposit is receiv- 
ed. Refunds resulting from cancellations may take 8 to 10 weeks to pro- 
cess. ■ Applicable government regulations require that air/land costs are 
quoted and that the air cost is subject to revision based on the actual num- 
ber of participants; however, only the complete air /land package(s) des- 
cribed in this brochure is available. Price subject to change for currency 
fluctuation, any taxes imposed since the price of this trip has been set and 



applicable government regulations. Trips are based on a minimum of 40 
participants. 

Responsibility: Arthurs Travel Center. Inc. SSusquehanna U. Alumni Assn. 
and/or its associated agents act as agent only for all services furnished here- 
in and expressly disclaim all responsibility or liability of any nature whatso- 
ever occurring during the tour or tours described herein and for loss of trip 
time resulting from airline delays. All tickets, coupons and orders are is- 
sued subject to the foregoing and to any and all terms and conditions under 
which the means of transportation and/or other services provided thereby 
are offered and/or supplied by the owners, contractors or public carriers 
for whom Arthurs Travel Center acts solely as agent. Arthurs Travel Cen- 
ter reserves the right in its discretion to change any part of the itinerary or 
the air carrier or the aircraft utilized without notice and for any reason. 

Due to the fuel situation the airlines anticipate the possibility of price in- 
creases for fuel. Therefore, the trip price is subject to increase based on any 
surcharge levied by the airlines resulting from increased fuel costs. 



For further information, contact and mail deposits to 
PHONE: (717) 374-2345 



Buss Carr, Director of Alumni Relations, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 



NOTE: To ensure that you are enrolled on the trip of your choice, make certain that you use this coupon ! ! ! 



Reservation Coupon 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: 

Enclosed find deposit in the amount of $ 

Please enroll us(me). 



Name(s) 



IRELAND: August 8-16, 1975 
($100.00 per person) for 



_person(s). 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



Business Phone 



Home Phone 



Rooming with 



Please check if Single Supplement is desired Indicate airplane seating preferred (Not guaranteed) 

Please make checks payable to: Susquehanna University Alumni Assoc. 



Smoking Non-Smoking 









CAUSADfiR ZCOEEBORRd 
















WINTER 1974-75 












WRESTLING 












JV BASKETBALL 




su 




Opp 








SU 




Opp 


30 


Juniata 


24 








50 


Juniata 


67 


20 


Messiah 


18 








56 


Albright 


62 


16 


Albright 


37 








69 


Wilkes 


56 


12 


Johns Hopkins 


27 








84 


Messiah 


59 


22 


Salisbury 


27 








58 


Albright 


54 


9 


Bucknell 


36 








54 


Lycoming 


72 


26 


Kings 


21 




VARSITY BASKETBALL 


67 


Lock Haven State 


73 


27 


Muhlenberg 


18 


SU 




Opp 


78 


Lebanon Valley 


61 


15 


Lebanon Valley 


42 


57 


Juniata 


66 


103 


Capitol, Penn State 


69 


12 


Moravian 


33 


81 


Westminster 


100 


81 


Intramural All Stars 


61 


3 


Delaware Valley 


44 


69 


Albright 


74 


69 


Bucknell 


73 


12 


Swarthmore 


27 


74 


Wilkes 


83 


58 


Juniata 


59 


10 


Elizabethtown 


45 


73 


Messiah 


65 


69 


Wilkes 


64 


21 


Scranton 


24 


86 


Augsburg 


97 


88 


York 


76 


15 


Gettysburg 


36 


67 


Upsala 


64 


50 


Lycoming 


55 




Won 4 Lost 11 




60 
72 


Luther 
Albright 


61 
70 


56 


Scranton 
Won 9 Lost 7 


52 




VARSITY WOMEN'S 




73 
67 


Lycoming 
Lock Haven State 


66 
68 








SU 

18 


BASKETBALL 

Albright 


Opp 

88 


62 
85 
65 


Lebanon Valley 

Grove City 

Upsala 

Philadelphia Textile 


63 
70 

61 


JV WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 
SU Opp 


26 


Lebanon Valley 


58 


72 


87 


22 


Albright 


15 


10 


Elizabethtown 


64 


80 


Elizabethtown 


88 


37 


Lebanon Valley 


6 


34 


Juniata 


60 


62 


Juniata 


64 


20 


Elizabethtown 


47 


40 


Wilkes 


59 


59 


Wilkes 


60 


18 


Wilkes 


35 


27 
36 


Bucknell 
Bloomsburg State 


73 
81 


71 
95 


Delaware Valley 
York 


54 
75 


14 
12 


Bucknell 
Bloomsburg State 


22 
95 


22 


Dickinson 


65 


75 
63 


Wagner 
Lycoming 


66 
77 


12 


Dickinson 


27 




Won Lost 8 






Won 2 Lost 5 










69 


Scranton 
Won 10 Lost 13 

SPRING 1975 


66 










GOLF 






BASEBALL 






MEN'S TENNIS 




SU 




Opp 


SU 




Opp 


SU 




Opp 


400 


Dickinson 


395 





Dickinson 


4 


6 


King's 


3 


400 


Ursinus 


402 


2 


Dickinson 


1 





Juniata 


9 


393 


Upsala 


475 


4 


Messiah 








Elizabethtown 


9 


393 


King's 


421 





Messiah 


1 


2 


Dickinson 


7 


389 


Wilkes 


415 


9 


Juniata 


7 


5 


Lycoming 


4 


389 


Lycoming 


427 


3 


Juniata 


5 





Bloomsburg State 


9 


389 


Upsala 


441 


1 


Wilkes 


10 


3 


Albright 


6 


395 


Bloomsburg State 


417 


10 


Wilkes 


2 


2 


Upsala 


7 


400 


Juniata 


423 





Scranton 


2 


8 


Delaware Valley 


1 


394 


Bucknell 


389 


4 


Scranton 


6 


6 


Wilkes 


3 


390 


Scranton 


406 


16 


Philadelphia Textile 


22 


5 


Scranton 


4 


397 


Elizabethtown 


413 


3 


Philadelphia Textile 


4 





Bucknell 


9 


399 


Wilkes 


426 


2 


Elizabethtown 


5 




Won 5 Lost 7 




390 


Gettysburg 
Won 11 Lost 3 


389 


1 
3 
3 


Elizabethtown 
Western Maryland 
Western Maryland 




7 





TRACK 










1 


Albright 





SU 




Opp 




WOMEN'S TENNIS 




2 


Albright 


7 


54 


Dickinson 


91 


SU 




Opp 


1 


York 


5 


22 


Bloomsburg State 


123 


2 


Millersville State 


5 


7 


York 


2 


58 


Juniata 


115 


1 


Bloomsburg State 


6 


4 


Lock Haven State 


2 


58 


St. Francis 


8 


3 


Dickinson 


4 





Lock Haven State 


7 


51 


Delaware Valley 


103 


2 


Lock Haven State 


5 





Bucknell 


11 


51 


Albright 


26 


1 


Bucknell 


6 





Bucknell 


7 


46 


Gettysburg 


99 


2 


Shippensburg State 


5 


8 


Capitol, Penn State 


3 


53 


Bucknell 


92 


7 


Wilkes 
Won 1 Lost 6 





10 


Capitol, Penn State 
Won 11 Lost 15 


1 


109 


York 
Won 3 Lost 6 





SU Sports 



by PETE SILVESTRI 



YOU MIGHT SAY it's been a Long year for Susquehanna 
sports. Dave Long, that is. The 6-6, 190-lb. junior from 
Doylestown, Pa., a mainstay for the Crusader basketball 
team for the past three years, passed the 1000 career points 
mark this winter. This spring, he went out for the S.U. track 
and field squad for the first time, and proceeded to equal the 
school record for the high jump in his first intercollegiate 
meet with a leap of 6-4. Later on in the season he jumped 6-5. 
He was a consistent winner all season in that event and in the 
discus to lead the team in scoring with 54 points. At the Mid- 
dle Atlantic Conference Championships he took fourth in the 
discus and fifth in the high jump. 

Hurdler and relay man Bob Rattelman '75 of Pittsburgh 
was the high point man among the runners with 47 3 /i. He 
took second place in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles at the 
MAC meet in 55.6 seconds. Other MAC point-winners for 
the eighth place Crusaders were Glenn Levengood '75 of 
Gilbertsville, Pa., third place in the javelin; Chuck Yoder '76 
of Shamokin, Pa., sixth place in the javelin; and Jeff Yoder 
'76 of Mt. Carmel, Pa., sixth place in the mile in 4:21.8, 
breaking his own Susquehanna school record. The track team 
had a 3-6 record under new coaches Bob Muirhead and Bill 
Frey. 



The Crusader golf team enjoyed an 1 1-3 record, best golf 
mark in 10 years and best results in any sport in the last three 
years at Susquehanna. The golfers were remarkably consis- 
tent, the top five never totaling over 400. Their best day was 
389 and the average was 394.7, or 78.9 per man. Coach Buss 
Carr had good depth and balance, with eight different players 
finishing among the top five during the season. The leader was 
a freshman, Mike McFatridge of Glen Rock, Pa., who 
averaged 76. 

Other letter-winners were Steve Farrell '76 (Bloomfield, 
Ct.), 78.6; Doug Holcombe '75 (Somerville, N.J.), 80.2; Bob 
Carr '75 (East Hanover, N.J.), 81.4; Joe Mafera '77 (Locust 
Valley, N.Y.), 81.5; Kevin Flanagan '77 (Hamden,Ct.), 82.4; 
Bruce Dansbury '75 (Yardley, Pa.), 83.5; and Mark Bostic 
'78 (New Freedom, Pa.), 83.7. The team finished eighth 
among 19 schools at the MAC Tournament. 

Carr, co-captain of the soccer team and captain of the 
golfers, graduates with four letters in each sport, the first 
Susquehanna man to earn four letters in two sports since foot- 
ball and track star Don Owens '72. 



The baseball team took two games from Penn State 
Capitol Campus in its last outing, its only sweep in a season of 
13 doubleheaders, to finish with an 11-15 record. Freshman 



catcher Bill Hart, Weatherly, Pa., batted .292 with a team 
high 2 home runs and 4 doubles, and 10 RBIs to earn coach 
Jim Hazlett's Best Hitter and Best Rookie awards. Second 
baseman Brad Moore '77 (Old Saybrook, Ct.) won the 
Highest Offensive Rating award with a .259 average, 3 
doubles, 7 RBIs, and team-leading totals of 14 walks and 13 
runs scored. Lefthander Dave Brown '76 (Williamsport, Pa.) 
had the mound staffs best record at 4-2 and had a 2.00 ERA. 
Over one stretch he won three games in a row against 
Elizabethtown, Albright and Lock Haven State, including 
two 10-inning shutouts and a string of 25-2/3 straight 
scoreless innings. 



The men's tennis team got off to a bad start, losing six of 
the first eight, but won three of the last four to finish at 5-7. 
The squad had a new coach in Bill Moore '63. Leading players 
were Larry Hill '76 (Brick Town, N.J.), Bob Wentz '77 (Had- 
don Heights, N.J.), Pete Burton '78 (Chatham, N.J.), Jim 
Packer '76 (Aldan, Pa.), and Bob Danielson '75 (Yorba Lin- 
da, Calif). 

Ginny Davis '77 (Warminster, Pa.) was again the only 
bright light on the women's tennis team. Playing in the first 
singles position for the second year she had the squad's best 
record at 5-2. The team took its only victory in its last match, 
finishing 1-6. 



The Crusader basketball team concluded a somewhat 
disappointing season on a high note by winning four of its last 
five games, including two Middle Atlantic Conference 
Northern Division victories, to finish with a 10-13 record, 5-5 
in the league. 

The most impressive performance of the campaign came 
in the finale when S.U. upset Scranton by 69-66 to hand the 
Royals their only MAC-North loss of the year. The Royals 
went on to win the league's post-season championship tourna- 
ment. Susquehanna earlier had scored two victories over Up- 
sala, which met Scranton in the title game, giving the 
Crusaders a 3-0 mark against the league's top two teams. 

The season began disastrously with the Crusaders losing 
their first four games, including three important league out- 
ings. Although the team played a great deal of excellent 
basketball thereafter, its efforts to salvage a winning record 
were repeatedly stymied by an inability to come through in 
the close games. Susquehanna had six contests that were 
decided by one or two points and lost five of them. Perhaps 
the most frustrating of these narrow defeats was the first, a 
6 1 -60 loss to Luther which spoiled an otherwise fine showing 
at the Lutheran Brotherhood Tournament in Minneapolis 
over Christmas vacation. The Crusaders threw a scare into 
host Augsburg in the opening round of the tourney before 
losing 97-86. S.U. topped Upsala 67-64 in the second round. 
In the battle for fifth place, the Crusaders led Luther by six 
points with 1:20 remaining, but lost the lead and had an in- 
bounds pass stolen by Luther for a game-winning basket with 
seven seconds left. The Orange and Maroon took some con- 
solation from the fact that Long, who scored 60 points in the 
three games, was named to the All-Tourney team. 

It seemed that Susquehanna might be on the comeback 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Freshman 

star 

McFatridge 

ofSU's 

winningest 

74-75 

learn. 



Senior 

hoopster 

Wolckenhauer, 

the end of 

a great 

collegiate 

career. 




trail when it nipped Albright 72-70 on a last-second bomb by 
Joe Prekopa '75 (McAdoo, Pa.) and trimmed Lycoming 73- 
66 in its first two games after returning from the North Coun- 
try. However, two consecutive one-point losses followed at 
Lock Haven and Lebanon Valley. Wins over Grove City and 
Upsala at home were followed by four straight defeats, three 
on the road, including a two-point defeat at Juniata and a one- 
point loss to Wilkes in successive outings. The Crusaders then 
put together their fine closing spurt which included home wins 
over Delaware Valley and York and an impressive and im- 
portant MAC road victory, 75-66 at Wagner. 

The Delaware Valley game included Long's 1000th 
career point. The junior finished the campaign with a total of 
1076, placing him eighth on the S.U. all-time list, 106 points 
behind jayvee coach and Sunbury businessman Bill Moore 
'63. Long was named to the second team of the MAC-North 
All-Stars. He finished as the team's top scorer with an 
average of 16.2 points per game and second rebounder with 
7.4 per game. 

Susquehanna's most valuable player was forward Ralph 



Wolckenhauer '75 (Whiting N.J.), who received coach Barry 
Keadle's Outstanding Player and Best Offensive Player 
awards and was named to the second team of the All- 
Lutheran squad. At 6-2, 1 70, Wolckenhauer made up for lack 
of size with drive and determination and was the team's top 
rebounder with 8.6 per game and second ranking scorer with 
14.4 points per game. He had the squad's best field goal 
shooting percentage by far at .573 and hit .800 from the foul 
line. Wolckenhauer's name will not appear among S.U. 
basketball's 1000 Point Club, but those who saw him play will 
remember him as one of the best all-around performers and 
among the most inspirational athletes ever to play the 
hardwood sport at Susquehanna. Few people play with more 
intensity. With great positioning, leaping ability, and timing, 
he excelled at the most difficult aspect of the game, offensive 
rebounding, and regularly scored tap-ins against taller op- 
ponents. He played defense with tenacity, chased loose balls 
with abandon, and could shoot quickly and accurately under 
pressure. He was also a hustler and team leader on defense. 
He will be missed. 

Mike Scheib, a 5-8 freshman from Millersburg, Pa., 
started every game at guard and earned the coach's Best 
Defensive Player award with a team-high 27 steals. An ex- 
cellent ball-handler, Scheib was also an offensive threat, 
averaging 1 1 points per game and leading the team in assists 
with 50. 

Prekopa received the Mr. Basketball award for out- 
standing contributions in terms of'dedication, team spirit, 
and courage." He averaged 7.2 points while appearing in all 
23 games. Another mainstay also seeing action in every game 
was 6-3 forward John Neuhauser '76 (Hatboro, Pa.), who 
averaged 6.1 points and 5.1 rebounds. 

The jayvee team, paced by freshman Bill Hart (Weather- 
ly. Pa.) and Bruce Gessner (Philadelphia), compiled a 9-7 
mark, the only winning record among S.U. winter sports 
aggregations. 

* * * 

The wrestling team's record was spoiled by a lack of able 
bodies that resulted in forfeiture of a total of 3 1 bouts during 
the 4-1 1 campaign. Injuries and academic pressures thinned 
the squad and by season's end the Crusaders had no grapplers 
in the 118, 1 34 and heavyweight classes. However, those who 
did wrestle never gave up and the squad compiled a 58-60-1 
record for the bouts in which it competed. 

Top individual was Bill Finch '76 (Westminster, Md.), 
who carded a 13-2 dual meet record and took fourth place in 
the Middle Atlantic Conference Tournament in the 150-lb. 
weight class. He received the Most Takedowns, Most Pins, 
and Most Valuable Wrestler awards from coach Charlie 
Kunes. 

John Liken '75 (Bloomsburg, Pa.) earned the Most Im- 
proved award with his 12-3 record at 158 pounds and Mark 
Reitz '78 (Jim Thorpe, Pa.) won the Best First-Year Man 
award with a 10-5 mark at 177 pounds. 



Lacking experienced players and practice time, the 
women's basketball team suffered through a second straight 
0-8 campaign and extended its losing string to 20 games. But 



SPRING 1975 



31 



the jayvees won two games out of seven, so there is still hope. 
Best players were Debbie Clemens '77 (Collegeville, 
Pa.), first in rebounds, second in points, and second in steals; 
Donna Jones '78 (Little Meadows, Pa.), leading scorer; and 
captain Bev Hafer '75 (New Columbia, Pa.), leader in steals. 



In club sports, the new hockey team tasted a few vic- 
tories last winter after a long dry spell, and the rugby team 
rang up its eighth straight winning season, counting both the 
fall and spring campaigns. 

The ruggers were 4-1-1 last fall and 6-2-1 this spring. 
Their spring season included a highly unusual triple sudden 
death overtime scoreless tie with Bucknell in the semi-finals 
of the annual Schaefer Tournament in Bethlehem. After one 
hour and 45 minutes of battle in wind, rain and mud, the tour- 
nament director halted play. Neither the Bucknell nor Sus- 
quehanna sides felt up to another contest so Bethlehem, 
winner of the other semi-final, was declared the champion by 
default. Bucknell won a coin-toss with Susquehanna for 
possession of the second place trophy, and Bison players 
proceeded to claim a 3-0 victory in the Lewisburg newspaper. 
While Susquehanna victories over Bucknell in official inter- 
collegiate sports are rare, the S.U. Rugby Club has a 3-1-2 



mark against B.U. over the past two years. 

Top scorers for the ruggers were forward Tony Plastino 
'76 of Lancaster, Pa., and back Kent Houser '76 of 
Lewistown, Pa., each with 16 points. Plastino led the club in 
tries with four. Houser was the captain. 

The hockey club, coached by assistant professor of 
mathematics Jim Handlan, compiled at 3-9 record against 
teams from the Sunbury Ice Hockey League. Next winter the 
Susquehanna team will be an official member of the league, 
which includes clubs from Bucknell, Juniata and other area 
colleges as well as town teams. Top scorers were Doug Miller 
'77 (Bel Air, Md.), Bill Fortune '76 (Timonium, Md), and 
John Fiske '78 (Rumson, N.J.). 

Glenn "Ernie" Stoudt '76 of Reading, Pa., has the dis- 
tinction of being the only student at Susquehanna to be a 
member of both club sport teams. 
* » » 

Joe Prekopa, co-captain of both the basketball and 
baseball teams, received this year's Blair Heaton Memorial 
Award as the senior man "best typifying the devotion to 
scholarship and athletics and the self-discipline and courage 
shown on the playing field by the late Blair L. Heaton '42." 
An accounting major, Prekopa had a 2.90 grade average and 
was a dormitory head resident. 



ATTENTION PARENTS 

If this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address at your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undeliverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



SUMMER 




Admissions Itinerary 



SUSQUEHANNA'S Admissions Of- 
fice personnel cover a lot of territory in 
recruiting each year's freshman class 
and filling it with the kind of students 
who want and will most likely benefit 
from the education offered at your alma 
mater. They have released the schedules 
listed below so you'll know when they 
are in your area. 

To make contact for your own 
children or for friends, call the Ad- 
missions Office at (717) 374-2345 or 
write before the visit. Or, of course, 
simply stop by at the location of a 
College Fair or College Night. These 
people wish to serve you and in doing so, 
serve Susquehanna. They welcome con- 
tacts with you, whether on campus or in 
the field. 

The staff consists of Paul W. 
Beardslee, director; James M. Skinner 
'64, associate director; and two new 
assistant directors, William C. Heyman 
and Nora S. Williams '74. Dean of 
students Edward J. Malloy helps to 
cover some of the College Nights. 



Sept 


. 22-26 


Sept 


. 29-Oct. 3 


Oct. 


3-6 


Oct. 6- 10 


Oct. 


13-17 


Oct. 


20-22 


Oct. 


23-24 


Oct 


20-24 


Oct 


26-31 


Nov 


.3-5 


Nov 


.3-7 


Nov 


.6-7 


Nov 


. 10-14 


Nov 


. 17-21 


Dec. 


1-5 



Dec. 8- 1 2 



Dec 15-19 



Westchester County, New York 

Central New Jersey 

Boston, Western Massachusetts 

Harrisburgarea 

Northern New Jersey 

New York, Long Island College Fairs 

Long Island College Fair, 

ACAC in Atlanta, Georgia 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Philadelphia area 

York County, Pennsylvania 

Baltimore College Fair 

Lancaster County. Pennsylvania 

Northern New Jersey 

Washington, D.C. 

Southern New Jersey 

Southern, Central Pennsylvania 

Western Connecticut 

Washington, D.C. College Fair 

Philadelphia area 

Princeton, Shore area 

Rochester, Syracuse. New York 

Buffalo, New York 

Long Island 

Westchester, Rockland, Putnam 

Counties, New York 

Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania 

Pittsburgh. Johnstown, 

Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania 

Southern, Central Connecticut 

Long Island 

Wilmington, Delaware 



Skinner 

Heyman 

Beardslee 

Skinner, Williams 

Heyman 

Heyman 

Beardslee 

Skinner 

Skinner. Williams 

Skinner. Williams 

Skinner, Williams 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Skinner 

Williams 

Heyman 

Beardslee 

Heyman. Skinner 

Skinner 

Williams 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Heyman 

Skinner 
Williams 

Beardslee 
Skinner 
Heyman 
Williams 



Sept 


.23 


Sept 


.25 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


14 


Oct 


15 


Oct. 


16 


Oct 20 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 22 


Oct 


23 


Oct 30 


Nov 


.3 


Nov 


.4 


Nov. 5 



Nov. 6 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 18-19 



College Nights 

Camden Catholic College Night (Cherry Hill. NJ) 
Bernards High School (Bernardsville. NJ) 
Franklin, Massachusetts College Night 
Northport High School College Night (NY) 
Towson High School College Night (MD) 
Chambersburg High School (PA) 
Maplewood. New Jersey 
Hunterdon College Night (Flemington, NJ) 
Red Lion College Night (York, PA) 
West York College Night (PA) 
Freehold, New Jersey College Night 
Haddon TownshipCollege Night (Camden. NJ) 
Mt. Pleasant College Night (New Castle, DE) 
Scotch PlainsCollege Night(Fanwood, NJ) 
Atlantic City College Night (NJ) 
Manheim Central College Night (PA) 
Wilton, Connecticut College Night 
Conard High School (West Hartford, CT) 
Monmouth County College Night 

(New Shrewsbury, NJ) 
Mathacton High School (Nornstown, PA) 
Monmouth County College Night (Middletown, NJ) 
Upper Moreland High School (Willow Grove, PA) 
Milford Mill High School (Baltimore, MD) 
Jamesville-Dewitt High School (Syracuse. NY) 



Heyman 

Heyman 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Skinner 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Heyman 

Sk inner. Williams 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Herman 

Beardslee 

Heyman 

Williams 

Heyman 

Beardslee 

Beardslee 

Malloy 

Heyman 

Malloy 

Skinner 

Skinner 

Beardslee 



<N OUR COVER: Susquehannans on the 
loon? Not really. University geologists have 
sen in the Rocky Mountains and early this 
immer were in Iceland, but this photo is of a 
eld trip group descending into the Crossman 
lay Pit at Parlin. N.J. We sent Pete Silvestri 
ong to take some pictures and tell you about 
. The story begins on the next page. 
Also, by special request and because it offers 
:atly-expressed insights into Susquehanna's 
lurch-related character, we present the text of 
le 1975 Commencement Address delivered by 
r. Pauline Tompkins, president of Cedar 
rest College. This begins on page 8. 
Speaking of church relationships, lOOalum- 
from the classes of 1940, 1950, 1960 and 1970 
ere randomly selected by computer to take 
irt in an attitude survey conducted by the 
iitheran Church in America among its 18 
lieges and universities in the U.S. If you are 
;e, please help us by completing the question- 
lire — we appreciate your cooperation 
icerely. — G.T. 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writer 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 44 



SUMMER 1975 



No. 4 



CONTENTS 

Admissions Itinerary Inside front cover 

Tracing the Fractures in New Jersey 4 

Your Susquehanna Legacy 8 

by Pauline Tompkins hc'75 

Susquehannans On Parade 12 

"I Do" 15 

Fall Sports Schedules 15 

Born Crusaders 17 

Deaths 18 

SU Sports 19 

by Peter Silvestri 



eorge H. Bantley '41, president, William C. Davenport 
3. Robert Hackenberg '56, vice presidents; Signe S. 
ates 71. secretary; Chester G. Rowe '52. treasurer; 
ouglas E. Arthur '49, Henry J. Keil '39. Edward S Rogers 
2, Samuel D Ross '54. Raymond G. Hochstuhl '47. 
preservatives on the University Board of Directors; 
mon B Rhoads '30. Louis F. Santangelo '50, represen- 
tees on the University Intercollegiate Athletic Com- 
mittee. 

:ecutive Board members-at-large. term expiring 1976; 
imuel D Clapper '68. James Gormley '55, Lester C. 
lilman '52. Alan C. Lovell '70. Franklin G. Smith '55. 
rm expiring 1977; Maria Wermkowski MacFarlan '62. 
wood M McAllister '49. Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69. 
ill R. Smith '63. James W White '58 Term expiring 1978; 
■nothy E Barnes '35. Judith A. Blee '62. Martha A. Fisher 
73, D Edgar Hutchison '34, Gene L. Stock '56. 



SUMMER 1975 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1 931. at the Post Office at 
Selmsgrove, Pa. 17870. under the Act of August 24, 1912 Published four times a 
year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove. Pa 



TRACING 

the 

FRACTURES 

in New Jersey 




ALL SCIENCE STUDENTS spend long hours in the 
laboratory. But for geology students, the most important 
"lab" work is done outside the confines of any building, 
because in a real sense their laboratory is the entire planet 
earth, from crust to core. 

The Geology Department at Susquehanna conducts two 
major field trips each year, usually over three-day weekends, 
in addition to several one-day outings. 

Last spring a group visited eastern Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey. Participating were 1 8 students, faculty members 
Robert Goodspeed, Frank Fletcher and Richard Lowright, 
and a representative of the Alumnus who came back with 
the pictures on these pages and a fine appreciation of the fact 
that a neophyte can only begin to scratch the surface of the 
field of geology in a three-day period. 

The major obstacle to comprehension for the uninitiated 
is the scientific terminology. For someone who doesn't know 
Ordovician from Silurian or Shawangunk from Martinsburg, 
and thinks a graywacke is a creature from a Tolkein fantasy, 
understanding three Ph.D.s and a group of highly intelligent 
college-level geology majors can be very difficult. 

The first stop was the Delaware Water Gap, familiar to 
all who drive on Interstate Route 80 which travels directly 
through the gap. But how many of the thousands of motorists 
who pass through this spectacular piece of scenery every day 
stop to ask how it got there? The S.U. group did. 

Geologists, like all scientists, deal in "multiple working 
hypotheses" rather than absolute answers when dealing with 
such questions. The Susquehannans considered a number of 



alternative explanations for this phenomenon. For 
simplicity's sake, only one is presented here — the one 
preferred by Dr. Lowright. 

The basement bedrock, says Lowright, contains "frac- 
tured traces," tiny fractures in the rock which are so small 
they are invisible to the naked eye but which become major 
weak points in the rock through the action of physical and 
chemical weathering. The fractured traces buckle under the 
weight of the crust above, and a "topographic low" develops, 
in this case a gap in the mountain range. 

Since running water follows the path of least resistance, 
a stream is likely to flow in such a gap and over a period of 
millions of years the rushing water will continue to erode and 
continually enlarge and deepen the gap. This explanation can 
apply not only to the Delaware Water Gap, through which 
flows the Delaware River, but also to the gap where the Sus- 
quehanna passes by Mount Mahanoy, and all similar for- 
mations in the region. 

A fascinating thing about fractured traces, says 
Lowright, is that they occur at certain intervals, thus ex- 
plaining the equally-spaced gaps in the mountain ridges along 
routes 35 and 522 near Selinsgrove. He says that intersections 
of fractured traces can be found from aerial photographs, and 
are good places to drill water wells, an idea which he says 
could benefit industry in Snyder County. 

Attempting to explain the formation of the water gap 
constituted only one level of the geologists' inquiry. Also of 
concern was the formation of the crust itself and the folding 
action which created the mountain range, even before the for- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



m 




**Vo 



M 



Clockwise: Dr. Lowright explains Sandy Hook, SU vans at 
the Gap, the stream running through the Crossman Clay 
Pit, and a student using his hand lense at the same place. 




"*&Uf 



mation of the gap. This matter was pursued at several out- 
crops between the water gap and the Easton area. It was dis- 
covered that the mountain-building process below Easton 
was of a different type than that observed further north, 
"Alpine" rather than "Appalachian." 

Observations were made not only on the large scale of 
the mountains, but on a small scale to the extent of examining 
the "texture" of rocks with hand magnifying lenses to observe 
the size, shape and arrangement of the individual particles or 
grains. The hand lenses got much use, along with the com- 
passes used to measure the "strike" or directional trend of the 
rocks and the "dip" or angle of slope. 

A geology field trip is not always as "rural" an experi- 
ence as one might expect. Most of the formations observed 
on the first day were along highways where sub-surface 
rocks had been uncovered by road-building. "We owe a lot 
to the highway department and the railroads," quipped Dr. 
Fletcher. 

Several years ago the geologists used to eat at 
restaurants and spend the nights in motels on their field trips. 
Recently they have been saving money by camping out and 
preparing their own meals. So the group last spring came 
prepared with sleeping bags and large tents owned by the 
Geology Department. 

However, a long and tiresome search for a suitable 
campground on Friday night ended in frustration as no less 
than five different establishments either rejected the group 
("Families Only") or were rejected by Dr. Goodspeed as too 
expensive. At about 1 a.m., after traveling 360 miles since 



•' -f£ 




SUMMER 1975 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Opposite page: Geologists wander through a glacial deposit 
at Townsbury. Dr. Goodspeed points out a calcile vein at a 
roadside outcrop, some students measure "strike" and "dip" with 
compasses while others examine rock composition at Delaware 
Water Gap Right: Dr. Fletcher and group observe sand dunes 
and grains of sand are studied at Island Beach. 



leaving Selinsgrove, the contingent finally found a place to 
stay — at the home of Goodspeed's mother in Pennington, 
N.J. So instead of canvas, the troops had a real roof over their 
heads. The floors were at least as comfortable as ground, and 
several enjoyed real beds. The kitchen was a little small for 
cooking breakfast for 22 people, but the only real in- 
convenience was that caused by such a large group lining up to 
use one bathroom. 

The second day was spent on the New Jersey shoreline 
studying the geology of the coastal plain. It had rained most 
of Friday evening, and the sunshine at the beach on Saturday 
was a welcome change. The switch in weather also provided a 
lesson in geology, as the students observed how quickly sand 
dunes "recover" from a storm. Sections of dunes that had 
been cut and washed out by the previous night's storm were 
already filling in again with sand. 

The Atlantic Highlands Overlook afforded a spectacular 
view of the New York City skyline and harbor in the distance, 
and an even better view of Sandy Hook, which is what the 
group came to see. Sandy Hook is one of the best examples of 
such a formation that can be seen from the land surface in the 
entire world, according to Dr. Goodspeed. The group dis- 
cussed how the prevailing wind direction and action of the 
waves moves sand along the shoreline, causing the curve on 
the "hook." 

The spot the students seemed to enjoy most was an un- 
likely candidate for the honor: The Crossman Clay Pit in 
Parlin, N.J., a wide, deep sand pit, barren and heavily eroded, 
that could have passed for the surface of the moon except for a 
few junk trappings like an old lawnmower, abandoned in a 
spot where there was no grass in sight. Here, in a small stream 
that wandered through the area, they observed geology in ac- 
tion, and were fascinated by the ripple marks forming in the 
stream bed, the pebbles being carried along by the water, and 
the changes in the course of the stream caused by hard 
material in the bank deflecting the current. "Just like we 
learned in class!" one student exclaimed. "Did you think we 
were kidding?" laughed Dr. Lowright. 

The final stops on Sunday were to observe glacial 
deposits in Northern New Jersey, where it was noted that the 
region owes its fertile soil to silt left on the bed of a glacial lake 
during the ice age. 

Back in Selinsgrove, the Alumnus observer went 
home to rest while the geologists stayed on campus stowing 
away their gear until the next outing — including the tents 
which had never been unpacked. — P.S. 



SUMMER 1975 



' V 





A .f : -> 





Your 

Susquehanna 
Legacy 



by PAULINE TOMPKINS hc'75 

Dr Tompkins, president of Cedar Crest College, is a former political 
science professor and executive of A All W. This is her address to 
Susquehanna's 1975 Commencement, where she received the honorary Litl.D 



PRESIDENT WEBER, members of the Board of 
Directors, members of the faculty and staff, parents 
and friends of the Senior Class; and — primar- 
ily! — members of the Class of 1975: it is my privilege to 
share this eventful occasion with you. 

Each one of you is a unique human being; each of 
you will take from your years here, in addition to the 
experiences you have shared in common, your par- 
ticular Susquehanna "legacy." How you spend, invest, 
develop it is peculiarly up to you. But you are already 
the recipients of a strong heritage, and everyone of us 
who watches you set forth this day does so with keen 
and prayerful expectations. 

For the few moments I have with you today, let me 
talk about the legacies of a college or university. 
Although you and I are products of a different genera- 
tion and geography, we are joined through our involve- 
ment in the great liberal arts tradition. I think perhaps 
it has some persisting common elements which affect us 
all, regardless of time and place. In describing them, I 
do so with the thought that if I could give each of you a 
graduation gift, it would be an awareness of your Sus- 
quehanna legacy. 

For simplicity, I divide the legacy into three parts. 

The first is an appreciation of the capacity of in- 
dividuals for greatness, and through this a reaffirma- 
tion of man's and woman's potential for growth. 



Susquehanna is what it is today because of the vi- 
sion and life involvement of some very dedicated in- 
dividuals, starting well over a century ago. In your 
time, given the relative smallness and intimacy of this 
university community, I am confident that you have 
sensed greatness in your midst, among those with 
whom you have studied and learned. Their light will 
brighten as the years go by. 

The value of this part of the Susquehanna legacy is 
underscored when we realize the degree to which we 
frequently tend to underestimate our potential as in- 
dividuals. In a mass society marked by the imper- 
sonalism of technology and by sheer numbers, it is dif- 
ficult to believe that the efforts of any individual can 
count for much, or make any real difference. There is a 
subtle temptation to excuse ourselves from trying. We 
look to the giants of the past and lament that "they 
don't make people like that anymore." 

The truth is that the "people like that" emerged 
frequently from the most unlikely situations. We only 
need recall a Jesus, a Lincoln, a Helen Keller to make 
the point. 

But I am sure you can identify such persons of 
greatness among living contemporaries, including in- 
dividuals on this campus. Their importance cannot be 
overestimated because they are a part of your life at a 
critical age. The late teens, the college years are crucial- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




ly significant in the individual's development of self- 
identity. To be undergoing this process in a place where 
the vast potential of individuals is demonstrated before 
one's eyes can be one of the most telling influences on 
his development. 1 suggest that a fuller awareness of 
this influence will be apparent to you in the years ahead. 
It will give you an increasing certitude about your own 
worth as a unique human being. 

The second part of your legacy will stem from the 
way the University has prepared you for living. Here 
too, each of you will realize your full inheritance only 
much later, and its measure will be determined by the 
use you make of what was offered you while you were 
here. 

It is traditional to call the college years "the best 
years of your life." I am not altogether certain what is 
meant by the phrase. I suspect that to many, looking 
back nostalgically after the "life is real, life is earnest" 
experience of the so-called "real" world, the college 
years seem like a bright, carefree interlude. I suggest 
that if indeed this is what is meant, it is a tragic com- 
mentary on the lives of adults who apparently never 
really grew up after college. For each of us, as an 
evolving, maturing human being, the best years of our 
life ought to be the years we are living now: a moving 
panorama in which we are quietly, unostentatiously 
building on all that has gone before. Your education, in 



retrospect, should contribute substantially to the foun- 
dation for this kind of continuing growth. If and to the 
degree that it does, the years here should have been — up 
to this point in your lives — the best years of your life. 
The college years are times of carefree fun. But 
they are also times of anguish. Education is frightening 



people like that came 
from unlikely situations 



because it exposes the mind's illiteracy and poses a 
potential threat to principles and convictions which 
have been programmed into us from infancy, if not 
before. Ignorance, compounded by immaturity, does 
not take kindly to education. Paradoxically, in self- 
defense, we are often tempted to resist the mind- 
opening which education requires. We don't want to 
"know" the truth because the freedom which truth 
bestows bears a burden of responsibility we are not 
ready to embrace. 

For the undergraduate, the revelations of 



SUMMER 1975 



knowledge come at a time when the struggle for self- 
identity is most acute. He cannot mature without 
knowledge; yet because he lacks maturity the exposure 
to knowledge can be excruciating. The challenge before 
him is how to get a balanced perspective on his relation 
to the rest of the world, on the relative importance of his 
selfhood in an incredibly complex universe. 

I don't know how each of you has tried to cope 
with this challenge. Hopefully, as you have added to 
your store of knowledge, you have learned how to 



we don't want 
to know the truth 



evaluate facts, how to work with concepts, how to use 
your minds — in short, how to think. To this degree you 
may already have seen yourselves "grow." You may 
have acquired an appreciation of the relationship be- 
tween ignorance and intolerance, fear and dogmatism, 
love and beauty, truth and humility — through the 
courses you have taken, but also through observing 
these relationships in your own mind and behavior. 

Education should have as a primary objective 
relating each student to the human concerns inherent in 
the disciplines and subjects studied: otherwise it will 
have limited use as a preparation for living and the 
college graduate will go through life as observer rather 
than participant. This has to be an immensely 
frustrating life experience; in addition, the world simp- 
ly can't afford it. 

One of the most profound causes for despair in the 
contemporary world is our sense of inadequacy — even 
impotence, in responding to the crisis conditions which 
characterize our civilization. We feel overwhelmed by 
them because of their magnitude and because they 
seem to require the invention of new concepts and 
methods transcending our experience. The unremitting 
burden of an overpopulated planet in terms of existing 
life-support systems; the world energy crisis with its 
particular impact on this country, which for the first 
time in our history appears to have reached the end of 
its last frontier; the muted threat of nuclear an- 
nihilation — here are three dramatic illustrations of the 
plight of mankind. Too encompassing to comprehend, 



too tragic and too demanding of us in their implications 
to be willing to confront them, the vast majority pass by 
in studied aloofness. Only a handful among the world's 
few billion are about the task of responding. 

It is my conviction that the responses you make to 
the crises and challenges which will confront you will be 
shaped in large part by the degree to which this institu- 
tion has in truth prepared you for living. If your en- 
counter with knowledge has been thought-provoking as 
well as fact-learning, it will enable you in the course of 
your life and experience to perceive contemporary 
issues with a sense of proportion. Instead of the 
dramatic overreaction of the underdeveloped intellect, 
which pronounces each crisis unique and un- 
precedented — you will be able to discern historical 
parallels in certain of the situations confronting you, 
and thus to bring a more tempered and a wiser 
response. You will recognize that to other peoples and 
other times, their crises and dilemmas seemed unique. 
If you have studied the 14th Century, for example, you 
will have experienced vicariously one of the worst 
epochs in European history when the continent was 
beset with famine, war, and the bubonic plague — which 
killed about one-third of the entire population of 
Europe and was the most lethal episode known to 
history. In the words of historian Barbara Tuchman, 
there came an "epidemic of violence, depopulation, 
bad government, oppressive taxes, . . . working class 
insurrection, monetary crisis, decline of morals and rise 
in crime, decay of chivalry (we, today, would translate 
chivalry as 'civility'), and above all, corruption of 
society's central institution, the Church, whose loss of 
authority and prestige deprived man of his accustomed 
guide in a darkening world." 

One could argue that it must have been far more 
difficult for men to surmount the evils of the 14th Cen- 
tury than for us to respond to today's crises. Given the 



the doom factor generates 
a coping mechanism 



absence of widescale education, the lack of knowledge 
about the past, the primitive state of technology and 
communication, and the seeming collapse of religious 
authority — one can only wonder that man made it at 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



a reverence for life 



all. And yet the moral of the tribulations of the 14th 
Century — a universal moral actually — is that "the 
doom factor (again quoting Miss Tuchman) sooner or 
later generates a coping mechanism." Or, in Professor 
Toynbee's words, "challenge and response." 

"Dead" history — the recitation of facts — simply 
notes that Europe survived the 14th Century. "Living" 
history explores the reasons why Europe survived. The 
why involves human beings — what made them respond 
or give up; turned them into saints or demons. "Living" 
history does more than this however: it relates you, the 
individual student, to those European ancestors so that 
you grow through the conscious act of identifying with 
them in their sometimes pragmatic, sometimes blind, 
sometimes moral and philosophical responses to the 
challenges and catastrophes of their time. 

If one moves from history to science, art, 
literature — the same sort of relevance applies. You 
become involved as a unique, discreet human being. A 
connection is made. And education as preparation for 
living is the result. 

The last part of the legacy is a recognition of the 
sanctity, the holiness if you will, of life. It develops 
through the college years from an education which 
highlights both the mystery and majesty of life. Sus- 
quehanna is one of a relatively small number of univer- 
sities which is church-related. The ambiguousness of 
that phrase is painfully evident in contemporary socie- 
ty, where far too often the educator hides the light of his 
Christian commitment under a barrel of secularjargon. 
There are some church-related institutions where this 
tendency is resisted, not by a narrow, mind-closing 
religious parochialism, but by a positive, mind-and- 
soul-stretching effort to combine a growth in learning 
with growth in the Christian faith. This effort is a 
response in part to the proven inadequacy of education 
which regards values solely in relative terms and ig- 
nores the search for the sanctions which give them 
validity. At the time of the Nuremberg trials, Justice 
Robert Jackson noted the chilling paradox that 
"modern society needs to fear . . . only the educated 
man. . . . the most serious crimes against civilization 
can be committed only by educated and technically 
competent people." 



The attempt to combine growth in learning with 
growth in the Christian faith has also a more fun- 
damental, positive rationale: it should lead inward to a 
recognition of man's relation to a higher power and to 
his destiny as a child of God; and outward to a percep- 
tion of the universe transcending the ephemeral and 
material, imbuing it with eternal relevance. With such 
perspectives the educated man and woman can attain 
their God-given potential, and become fit instruments 
in the fulfillment of the divine plan. 

Alfred North Whitehead reminds us that educa- 
tion should afford "the habitual vision of greatness." 
Our capacity for developing this vision is ultimately 
shaped by our conception of man. And the loftiest con- 
ception is one rooted in faith in the spiritual essence of 
man. 

The religious dimension in a church-related in- 
stitution at its highest is inseparable from the spirit of 
the university. It does not require a particular 
curriculum. And beyond the formal educational 
program, it finds expression through "witnessing." The 
individual student sees the witnessing through the eye 
of the spirit in the characters of those who teach him, 
and in the values their lives reveal. Looking back to my 
undergraduate years I can recall the names of adults 
who affected me spiritually. In retrospect, I have added 
others to the list, whose influence I felt only later when I 
was more ready to receive it. There weren't many; there 
don't have to be. "Where two or three are gathered 
together" the spirit — God — is truly in the midst of 
them, and the results in the lives of those they touch are 
incalculable. 

There is an intimacy on our smaller campuses, a 
potential for achieving what the Quakers call "a 
blessed community." To see the divine in the com- 
monplace, to respond with awe to the magic of crea- 
tion, to develop a reverence for life and a respect for 
every other human being — this is the priceless spiritual 
legacy which education at its best can bestow. As you 
go forth from this university, this is the legacy I covet 
most for you. 

And now you are ready to "commence"; to begin 
the next chapter in the venture of living. I hope Sus- 
quehanna has prepared you well for it. The universe is 
both frightening and exciting; the challenges wherever 
you are will be exhausting and inspiring. I hope you will 
never stop growing and wondering, either through con- 
ceit or despair. I hope you will keep pushing on, in the 
intuitive knowledge that life is a journey, not a harbor, 
and in the sublime conviction that a Divine hand is at 
the helm. 



SUMMER 1975 



11 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'21 

Marie Romig Huntington and her 
grandsons assisted in the dedication of a 
sanctuary lamp (Eternal Flame) in memory 
of the Rev. Dr. Park W. Huntington 7 7 at 
St. Stephen's Lutheran Church, Wilming- 
ton. Del., where he was pastor. 1 926-5 1 . 
and later pastor emeritus until his death in 
1972. 

'24 

Dr. Claude Buss, professor of Asian 
History at San Jose State University, was 
commencement speaker there in May. 
Retired from the San Jose faculty this year, 
he was the senior U.S. State Department 
officer in the Philippines when they were 
overrun by the Japanese in World War II. 
He received the S.U. Alumni Award for 
Achievement in 1970 after a distinguished 
career teaching at Stanford University. 

'30 

Dr. Luke H. Rhoads retires in October 
after 25 years as head of the Allegheny 
Lutheran Homes in Johnstown and 
Hollidaysburg. Pa. and Lutheran Social 
Services of the Allegheny Region. 

'32 

Mary Potter Copp retired after 26 years 
as head librarian of Jersey Shore(Pa.) H.S. 
and Public Library. She lives at 169 Ken- 
dall Ave., Jersey Shore. 

'34 

Edith Frankenjield Cramer retired from 
teaching in the Philadelphia schools. She 
expects to do part-time office work after 
settling in her new apartment at 5555 
Wissahickon Ave., Apt. 418, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 1 9 1 44. Mrs. G. Morris Smith, widow of 
Susquehanna's 10th president, is living with 
her. 

'35 

John P Maguire wrote a fascinating 
letter to his reunion class chairman John F. 
Hanna expressing regrets that he could not 
be back at S.U. for Alumni Day. Chief of 
all U .S. Army ports in Japan, he has been in 
that country ever since leaving the Navy as 
a Commander in 1947 to join General 
MacArthur's staff as a civilian. Flyer, 
golfer, fisherman, athletic official and art 
collector, he leads a most active life. Ad- 
dress: Chief of Water Terminals, Direc- 
torate of Transportation, U.S. Army 



Garrison, Honshu, FPO Seattle 98760. 

James W. Stirling retired as music 
teacher in the Hazleton (Pa.) schools. He 
did graduate work at Penn State and 
N.Y.U. and sang professionally in New 
York City. 

'40 

Virginia Mann Wolvern retired after 35 
years as director of the Yonkers (N.Y.) 
Public Library. Starting as a summer in- 
tern, she spent her entire professional 
career in Yonkers. 

Horace A. Kauffman was appointed 
manager, plant engineer at Lancaster (Pa.) 
Osteopathic Hospital. 

'45 

Harold R. Snyder has been appointed 
executive director of United Cerebral Palsy 
of Pennsylvania. He previously served as 
director of Travelers Aid International 
Social Services in New York and is a 
former pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church. 
Harrisburg. His son is Jeff Snyder '78. 

'46 

Ruth Cochrane Surplus is a school 
psychologist in the Clifton (N.Y.) public- 
schools. She lives at 198A Pompton Ave., 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 07009. 

Dr. Arthur Gelnett. Milton (Pa.) dentist, 
continues his interest in theatre and recent- 
ly played a lead in the Milton Rotary 
production of "You Can't Take It With 
You." 

'47 

Nancy Myers Landis of 1 3 15 Clayton 
Rd.. Lancaster, Pa. 17603, is associate 
buyer of handbags and luggage for Hagers 
Department Store in Lancaster. 

Dr. Donald R Bashore. associate 
professor of psychology at Bloomsburg 
State College, delivered the 1975 com- 
mencement addresses at SUNY 
Agricultural & Technical College at 
Morrisville, N.Y., the high school in Punx- 
sutawney. Pa., and Wyoming Seminary, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

'48 

William H McClure was promoted to 
vice president of finance for the manufac- 
turing division of Kinney Shoe Corp. He 
and his wife and family live at R.D. 3, Car- 
lisle, Pa. 

Harriet Gould Mertz. educational 
TV/AV media specialist. South Miami 



(Fla.) Sr. H.S.. was a participant of the 7th 
annual summer Asian seminar to Taiwan, 
Republic of China. Hosts were the 
National Chenghi University and the 
Chiang Youth Corps who served as guides, 
interpreters, and friends. Harriet is presi- 
dent of the University of Miami School of 
Music Alumni Association and the first 
woman secretary of Phi Delta Kappa 
professional education fraternity. 

'50 

Dr. Harry Bohonich is acting dean of the 
Graduate School. Shippensburg State 
College. He recently completed a book 
manuscript on nutrition. 

Richard R Doig was appointed general 
superintendent of machining and assembly 
at the Hydro-Turbine Division of Allis- 
Chalmers. York, Pa. With the corporation 
for a year, he formerly was owner of 
Plasticon Products, Inc., Honesdale. Pa. 
He lives with his family at 2740 
Stillmeadow La., York. 

'54 

Audrey M. ll'arnets is now office 
manager — supervisor of Agriculture Com- 
munications at Penn State University. 

'55 

The Rev. Charles W. Coales is the new 
administrator of the Buffalo Valley 
Lutheran Village in Lewisburg, Pa., a 
modern 108-bed facility offering certified 
skilled nursing care. He and his wife, the 
former Rose Marie Sharretls '55. and fami- 
ly continue to live in Williamsport. 

'56 

Gordon C Boop. senior vice president 
and trust officer of Bloomsburg (Pa.) Bank- 
Columbia Trust Co. was elected chairman 
of the administrative committee. Penn- 
sylvania Bankers Association Trust Dept.. 
serving some 200 banks in Pennsylvania 
with trust powers. 

Dr. Glen E. Smith is practicing at the 
Doctors Clinic, Webster, Tex. and is a 
member of the executive committee of 
Clear Lake Hospital, Webster. He was 
listed in the 1974 edition of Who's Who In 
Texas. He lives at 2709 Jamestown Dr., 
Dickinson, Tex. 77539. 

x'57 

Maj. Gerald Musselman was named 
Commandant of the Air Force Com- 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



munications Service NCP Professional 
Education Center at Richards-Gebaur 
AFB, Mo. 

'59 

Nicholas Kloap is a supervisory 
production engineer with Alcoa in Benton, 
Ark., and is also active in Boy Scouts and 
church. His wife is the former-Zane; Brown 
'56. Their address: 716 Saline Cir., Benton, 
Ark. 72015. 

Ronald G Alter was elected vice presi- 
dent, controller and treasurer of American 
Life, Wilmington. Del. 

'60 

William C. Shun is vice president of 
manufacturing. Knoll International, East 
Greenville, Pa. His address: 246 Lesher, 
R.R. 1, Collegeville. Pa. 19426. 

'62 

Dr. Charles R Bowen has successfully 
passed the examination for certification by 
the American Board of Oral Surgery. He is 
with Oral Surgery Associates. Burlington 
and Montpelier, Vt. 

Norman H Lauer was elected to council 
of the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified 
Public Accountants. He is a partner with 
the firm Fisher, Clark & Lauer, 
Selinsgrove. 

Dorothy Anderson, dean of freshmen 
and assistant dean of students at Sus- 
quehanna, is the dedicatee of The 1975 
Lanlhorn. 

'63 

Lee R. Conrad. 5242 Meadowbrook Dr., 
Good Hope Farms. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
17055, is a materials engineer with AMP 
Inc. He is a member of the executive com- 
mittee for the York chapter of American 
Society for Metals, an educational society 
for the advancement of metals engineering. 

Robert W. Curtis has been named chief 
of the division of the Washington. D.C. 
Area Audit Services. U.S. Department of 
Labor. He lives at 7742 Brandeis Way, 
Springfield. Va. 22153. 

Lynn Lerew was recently honored by the 
Chambersburg Area Sr. H.S. Band Promo- 
tion Association with a "This is Your Life" 
program. 

Sandra Sholley. instructor in the 
business education department at Mifflin- 
burg (Pa.) H.S.. was honored by the senior 
class with dedication of 1975 yearbook. 

'64 

Dr. Jane Gelnett, an osteopath, is in 
general practice at a six-person Medical 
Centre located at 412 First St., Indian 
Rocks, Fla. 33535. She is a charter member 
of the American College of Emergency 
Physicians. 




MANY ALUMNI wailed a long lime for this day! Ralph Witmer 15 fastens 
the orange and maroon ribbon to Susquehanna's ceremonial shovel, held by 
President Gustave Weber, at the informal groundbreaking for the new gymnasium 
and swimming pool on July 31. Both Witmer and Jack Shipe '40. center, are 
members of the University's Board of Directors. When completed in the 
fall of 1976. the physical education center, attached to the present Alumni 
Gym. will add some 43.000 square feel to the renovated facility built in 1935. 



Alan F. Straubel has purchased a garden 
center in York and named it "The Natural 
Look" after originating the name in the 
Selinsgrove area. He is doing residential 
and commercial landscape construction. 
His wife is the former Deanna Savior '65. 
who operates the garden center including a 
gift shop. They live at South Main St., Ex- 
t'd.. Red Lion, Pa. 17356. 

x'64 

Thomas H.L. Curtis was named light 
products coordinator of Pennzoil Com- 
pany's Economics, Supply and Distribution 
Division in Houston, Tex. He lives with his 
family at 14047 Cleobrook Dr., Houston, 
Tex. 77070. 



'65 

Dr. David A. Koch is the new president 
of the Pennsylvania Optometric Associa- 
tion. He practices in Altoona, Pa. 

William A. Straus is a chemistry and 
physics teacher at West Essex H.S. and 
teaches evenings at Montclair State 
College. His address is 55 E. Reid PL. 
Verona, N.J. 07044. 

x'65 

Susie Ryan Lyon received her B.S. in 
speech pathology and audiology from 
Ithaca College in 1968. She is now a recep- 
tionist and guide for the Sonnenberg 
Gardens Inc. mansion. She and her hus- 



SUMMER 1975 



13 



band live at 400 N. Main St., Canandaigua, 
NY. 14424. 

Edward E. Strang and his wife, the 
former Kennetha McCarthy '65. their son 
and daughter live at Revere La., R.D. 1, 
Glenmore. Pa. 19343. He is an assistant 
vice president, corporate banking depart- 
ment. Southeast National Bank of Penn- 
sylvania. 

'66 

James W. Good is an oceanography 
student at Oregon State University 
working on a master's in marine and 
coastal resource management. 

Fred W, Kelly is the newly-elected presi- 
dent of the Snyder County Trust Co. He, 
his wife and two sons live at 804 N. Eighth 
St., Selinsgrove. 

Dr. Suzanne Springer Zeok is assistant 
clinical professor of anesthesiology at the 
University of Kentucky Medical Center. 
She, her husband and daughter live at 278 
Winn Way, Lexington, Ky. 40503. 

'67 

Wayne H. Fisher is in actuarial work with 
Royal Globe Insurance Co. He is currently 
an associate of Casualty Actuarial Society 
and is working for fellowship membership. 
He is living at 270 Jay St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
10201. 

Charles A. Holmes, with Saban Metal 
Corp., lives at 3 Birchwood Dr., Scottsville, 
N.Y. 14546. 

Terry L. March was elected corporate 
controller of the international investment 
banking firm of Dillon Read & Co. Inc., 
New York City. 

'68 

Dr. Martin Banschhach has a 
biochemistry teaching appointment at the 
Louisiana State University School of 
Medicine beginning in September. 

Dr. Frank C. Grenoble has been dis- 
charged from the Navy and is in private 
dental practice in Palmyra. He. his wife and 
new daughter Amy live at 626 E. Birch St., 
Palmyra, Pa. 17078. 

Millard M . Grimes III earned his M.S. 
at the University of Colorado in January 
and is in dextrin products with Clinton 
Corn Processing Co. in Iowa. 

Ann Griffin Jones is clinical director for 
Tri-County Family Planning Services in 
Northern Dauphin County. Husband 
William Jones '72 is with the Dauphin 
County Redevelopment Authority, Ly- 
kens. Pa. 

Laura Scaife Mayer is teaching 7th grade 
English in the Gloversville (N.Y.) school 
system. Her husband Paul is pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church in Broadalbin. 
Their address: Box 86, Broadalbin, N.Y. 
12025. 



The Rev. Benjamin Larzelere is now 
pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Santa 
Fe. His wife, the former Beverly Steely '69, 
is program director for family planning 
materials for adult mentally retarded 
citizens, working with the New Mexico 
Association for Retarded Citizens and New 
Mexico Family Planning Council. They 
live at 645 E. Barcelona Rd., Santa Fe, N. 
Mex. 87501. 

William A. Lewis Jr. recently left the 
Felony Jury Trial Unit of the Philadelphia 
District Attorney's Office and is now 
working in the Congressional Liaison Unit, 
U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 
Washington D.C. Bill's primary respon- 
sibility is to review Congressional legisla- 
tion dealing with the criminal justice 
system. His new address is 1 17 E St. S.E., 
Washington. D.C. 20003. 

Dr. Richard M. Rex is associated with 
another doctor in optometric practice in 
San Diego. He is separated from the Army 
after two years as Chief of Optometry at Ft. 
Hood, Tex. Address: 3250 Ashford St., San 
Diego, Calif. 92111. 

Norrine Bailey Spencer was voted 1975 
Young Career Woman by the Newark 
(Del.) Chapter of the Business and 
Professional Women's Association of 
America. She is assistant director of 
summer and winter sessions in the Office of 
the Provost, University of Delaware. 

A. Michael Weaver is process and quali- 
ty control manager of the Owens-Corning 
Fiberglass plant in Seattle He, his wife the 
former Susan Heintzleman x'69 and son 
live at 17009 N.E. 35th St., Redmond, 
Wash. 98052. 

Frederick R. Swavely is now in the 
Process Engineering group of Firestone 
Plastics Co. He lives at 325 N. Reading 
Ave.. New Berlinville, Pa. 19545. 

x'68 

Stephanie J Blank is a certified 
respiratory therapy technician in the inten- 
sive care unit of the Bryn Mawr (Pa.) 
Hospital. Her new address is 3400 West 
Chester Pike, Apt. 509B, Newtown Square, 
Pa. 19073. 

Michael J- Cannizzo is division manager, 
Ryan Homes Inc. He and his wife, the 
former Barbara Gray, have two daughters 
and live at 4563 North Landing Way, R.R. 
6. Marietta. Ga. 30060. 

'69 

Paul D. Harro has been named first vice 
president of the Snyder County Trust Co. 
He, his wife and three sons live at 8 
Woodruff Ave.. Selinsgrove. 

Jon S. Bouker of William E. Ford & 
Associates was named to the 1975 
President's Council, Home Life Insurance 




JOGGERS Dr. Ken Fladmark. Dr. Gerry 
Gordon, and Skip Wieder, members of 
the Running Club at SV, recently won 
trophies for jogging over 3000 miles 
(presented by Phys Ed Dept. head Bruce 
Wagenseller who has jogged over 10.000 
miles I. Fladmark is a professor of 
business administration, Gordon an 
associate professor of history, and 
Wieder, vice president for development. 
The club includes area residents as 
well as University personnel. Other 
trophy winners have been Dr. Tom 
McGraih, professor of chemistry, 5000, 
and Sunbury architect Stan Seiple. 3000. 



Co.'s highest honor group, in recognition of 
outstanding achievement in placing $1 
million of new life insurance coverage 
during a 12-month qualification period. He 
lives with his wife and two sons in Atlantic 
Highlands, N.J. 



70 



Garrett L. Slauffer has been promoted to 
general practice manager of the Philadel- 
phia office of theC.P.A. firm ofCoopers & 
Lybrand. 

Frank J. Trembulak is controller for the 
Washington Township Memorial Hospital. 
Turnersville, N.J. 

71 

Timothy P. Byrnes is in data reduction 
and processing in the Analytical Section of 
the Materiel Test Directorate, Aberdeen 
Proving Grounds. His wife, the former 
Pamela Flinchbaugh '73, attended the 
American Institute of Musical Studies in 
Graz. Austria this summer for graduate 
study in vocal performance. Their address 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



is 813 Williamsburg Ct., Edgewood, Md. 
21040. 

1/Lt Frederick C. Hoffman is now 
stationed at Holloman AFB in New Mex- 
ico for duty as a weapons systems officer. 
He recently returned from Thailand. 

Karen L. Olson was commissioned a se- 
cond lieutenant in the Air Force after 
graduating from Officers Training School 
at Lackland AFB. Tex. She has been to 
Chanute AFB. 111., for training and duty as 
an aircraft maintenance officer. 

Nancy E. Wright, a senior at Ffamma 
School of Theology, spent the summer as a 
circus chaplain traveling with Circus Kirk, 
headed by a York College professor and 
operated by 50 students. 

John S. Hall is an associate manager of 
the Endicott Johnson Shoe Store in Hun- 
tington. N.Y. His wife, the former 
Christine Mowery x'73. graduated from 
SUNY at Stony Brook with a degree in 
sociology. Their address is 125 Terryville 
Rd., Apt. 14d, Port Jefferson Station, N.Y. 
11776. 

Lt.(jg) Alan B. Kegerise was awarded the 
Coast Guard achievement medal and cita- 
tion for superior performance at Gloucester 
City, N.J. 

Cynthia A. Frishkorn teaches Spanish at 
Cumberland Valley H.S., Mechanicsburg, 
Pa. She earned her M.S.Ed, at Temple 
University a year ago. 

Frederick D. Westbrook is principal of 
the New Hope elementary school, Hender- 
son, N.C. He lives with his wife and young 
son at Route 3, Box 202, Henderson, N.C. 
27536. 

72 

Janet Patten Bondi is a senior instructor 
in the department of medicine at 
Hahnemann Medical College and director 
of the Pulmonary Laboratory. She and her 
husband live at 1856 Acorn La., Abington, 
Pa. 19001. 

Tommy F Pelro has joined ICI United 
States Inc. as an income statement accoun- 
tant in the controller's department. He is 
based at corporate headquarters in 
Wilmington, Del. 

Joseph W. Lovman Jr C.P.A., has 
opened a new office at 370 Wymore Rd.. 
Winter Park, Fla. 32789. 

73 

Douglas C. Webb is coordinating 
manager of Servicemaster Industries Inc. 
He lives at 4591 Sequoia Dr.. Apt. B315. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17109. 

Steven L Brinser was transferred by 
Price Waterhouse & Co. to the firm's new 
office in Little Rock. He is a staff accoun- 
tant and his wife, the former Judy Stacker 
x'73. is an area supervisor for Dillards. 



SUMMER 1975 



They live at 14 1 3 Wewoka Dr., North Little 
Rock. Ark. 72116. 

74 

Susan J. Craft is on the public relations 
staff of the National Association of 
Manufacturers, Washington, D.C. She 
lives at Harwich Ct., Apt. 133, Alexandria, 
Va. 22311. 

John B. Madison was admitted at 
midyear to study biochemistry in graduate 
school at Western Michigan University on 
a teaching assistantship. 

John T. Ombelets is a new district 
manager with The Centre Daily Times cir- 
culation staff in State College, Pa. 

Joseph Cipriani is associate producer of a 
Bicentennial album. "The Colonial 
Keystone." for which musical arrange- 
ments were created by Nevin Garrett, band 
instructor at Danville Jr. H.S., and David 
Kammerer '76. TV's "Bonanza" star 
Lome Greene narrates the album — the only 
known state Bicentennial album — which 
was recorded at Susquehanna Sound 
Productions in Northumberland, Pa. 

x75 

Jeffrey L. Claflin is now organist at the 
Supplee Memorial United Presbyterian 
Church in Doylestown, Pa. He attends the 
Philadelphia Musical Academy. 



"I w 



BENNER-TROUT 

Margaret Trout x'72 to Douglas A. 
Benner. December 18, 1971, Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Lemoyne, Pa. Gail 
Alwine Woods '72 was a bridesmaid. Peggy 
earned her B.A. in English from Wilson 
College in 1972 and taught for two years in 
Harrisburg. She is now busy taking care of 
Cory Douglas who was born January 15, 
1975. Her husband is a graduate of Get- 
tysburg College and is doing graduate work 
at Penn State. / 830 Cricklewood Dr., Apt. 
306. State College, Pa. 16801. 

SCHANTZ-CHAMBERS 

Sandra C. Chambers x'72 to Robert F. 
Schantz, November 18, 1972, St. Bernard's 
Episcopal Church, Bernardsville, N.J. San- 
dra works with Nopco Division, Diamond 
Shamrock Corp., Morristown. Mr. 
Schantz is a steamfitter. / 1I75A Mt. 
Horeb Rd., Martinsville, N.J. 08836. 
GLAWE-SMITH 

Susan Smith '70 to Philip Glawe, March 
10, 1973, Calvary Methodist Church, East 
Orange, N.J. Attendants from Susquehan- 
na were Mary Lotspeich Lawrence '70 and 
Debra Davis Duncan '74. Susan is a 
caseworker for the Essex County Welfare 



Board in Newark. Her husband is a 
graduate of Indiana University, Bloom- 
ington, and is project manager at Bonland 
Sheet Metal Co., Wayne. / 24 Claremont 
Ave., Bloomfield, N.J. 07003. 
WERNER-LAUCKS 

Vicki Laucks to David Werner '70. April 
19, 1974, Harrisburg, Pa. Mrs. Werner is a 
registered nurse and Dave is in manage- 
ment with Pennsylvania Blue Shield. / 9 
Redwood Ct.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 
HARRISON-LANG 

Dr. Kathie Lang '71 to Dr. Randolph 
Harrison, July 26, 1974. Both earned their 
medical degrees in May from Medical 
College of Virginia and will serve residen- 
cies at the University of Kentucky Medical 
Center in Lexington. / 3501 Pimlico Pkwy., 
Apt. 37, Lexington, Ky. 40502. 
RIVOLI-LEHMAN 

Marsha A. Lehman '74 to Michael A. 
Rivoli, October 4. 1974, Rochester, N.Y. 
Marsha is an applications analyst with 
Eastman Kodak Co., Elmgrove. / Apt. 
50D. Poplar Garden Apts., Poplar Garden 
La., Rochester, N.Y. 14606. 

FALKNER-HINKLEY 

Laurel Hinkley '73 to Michael Falkner 
x'75. October 12, 1974, First 
Congregational Church, Canton Center. 
Ct. The wedding party included Lynn Hoff- 




SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1975 

Fall Sports Schedules 



FOOTBALL 



Sl3 



GROVECITY 

(Kiwanis-StaggHat) 
S20 at Westminster 
S27 at Upsala 

04 LYCOMING (Homecoming) 

Oil at Juniata 
Ol8 ALBRIGHT(ParentsDay) 
025 at Delaware Valley 
Nl at Wilkes 

N8 WAYNESBURG 



SOCCER 

Ol WESTERN MARYLAND 

04 UPSALA 

08 at Gettysburg 

Ol4 LYCOMING 

Ol8 BLOOMSBURG STATE 

022 at Elizabethtown 

029 at Bucknell 

031 WILKES 

N5 atScranton 

N8 at Lebanon Valley 

Nl2 at Dickinson 



1:30 

2:00 
2:00 
1:30 
1:30 
1:30 
1:30 
1:30 
1:30 



3:00 
10:00 
3:00 
3:00 
10:00 
3:00 
3:00 
3:00 
7:30 
10:30 
3:00 



man '74. William Bowman '75 anAJess Hill 
'75. James McFarland x'73 was organist. 
Laurie is a trust administrator with 
Maryland National Bank and Mike is 
associated with Riggs, Counselman. 
Michaels & Downes Insurance Agency, 
both of Baltimore. / 33 Maple Ave., 
Catonsville, Md. 21228. 

HORAN-BENINCASA 

Janis Benineasa '72 to Rex Horan, 
November 23, 1974, St. Columbkill 
Church. Boyertown, Pa. Terri Benineasa 
'75 and Diane Decker '73 were attendants 
and Susan IV right '72 was organist. Janis is 
in summer stock and her husband is an at- 
torney in New York. / 1574 81st St., 
Brooklyn. N.Y. 11228. 

HUGHES-WELLS 

Karen Wells '75 to W. Garrett Hughes. 
January 4. 1975. Karen teaches for the 
Montgomery County Intermediate Unit, 
King of Prussia, and is attending graduate 
school at Penn State. / 703 Mill Grove Dr., 
Audubon. Pa. 19407. 

BECK-STANSFIELD 

Lynne Stans field '74 to Gregory M . Beck 
'73. January 18, 1975. / R.D. 4, Dillsburg, 
Pa. 17019. 

MERTZ-MITCHELL 

Lugene C. Mitchell x'76 to Daniel 
Mertz. April 5. 1975, St. Paul's Lutheran 



CROSSCOUNTRY 



S20 


at Lebanon Valley 


2:00 


Ol 


WESTERN MARYLAND 


4:15 


04 


YORK 


2:15 


08 


ELIZABETHTOWN 


4:15 


Oil 


at Juniata, St. Francis 


2:15 


015 


at Dickinson 


3:00 


021 


MESSIAH* WILKES 


4:15 


025 


at Delaware Valley 


2:15 


029 


GETTYSBURG 


4:15 


N3 


ALBRIGHT 


4:15 


N5 


atScranton 


3:00 


N8 


MAC at Gettysburg 

FIELD HOCKEY 




S29 


at Messiah 


3:00 


Ol 


BUCKNELL 


3:30 


07 


LYCOMING 


3:00 


09 


DICKINSON 


3:00 


OI6 


at Bloomsburg State 


3:30 


021 


LEBANON VALLEY 


3:00 


024 


at Wilkes 


3:30 


028 


SHIPPENSBURG STATE 


3:00 


031 


at Juniata 

JV FOOTBALL 


2:30 


S29 


LYCOMING 


3:00 


06 


at Lock Haven State 


3:00 


OI3 


at Stevens Trade 


3:30 


O20 


JUNIATA 


3:00 


027 


at Lycoming 


3:00 


N3 


BUCKNELL 

JV SOCCER 


3:00 


09 


BUCKNELL 


3:00 


O20 


at Dickinson 


3:00 



Church, Cohocton, N.Y. Mr. Mertz is a 
graduate of Penn State and is an arborist 
with the F.A. Bartlett Tree Co. / Stony 
Lane Apts.. Apt. 50J, Dover, Pa. 17315. 
KLOCK-NICHOLS 

Karen E. Nichols to Barry R. Klock '70. 
April 25. 1975. St. Ambrose Church, 
Brockport. N.Y. Mrs. Klock is a personnel 
interviewer and Barry is assistant secretary 
in charge of wage and salary administra- 
tion, both at First Federal Savings and 
Loan Assn. / 1033-7 Stowell Dr.. 
Rochester. N.Y. 14616. 

BLOM-MANNINO 

Marilyn Mannino to Albin BlomJr. '71. 
May 10, 1975. Holy Trinity Church, Plain- 
field, N.J. Both bride and groom are with 
Dun and Bradstreet Inc. 

LAWRENCE-ROSIC 

Debra L. Rosic to Edward G. Lawrence 
Jr. '72 May 24, 1975, St. Thomas More 
Church, Darien, Ct. Ernest Tyler '72 was 
an usher. Ed is a graduate of the American 
Academy McAllister Institute of Funeral 
Service and is with the Edward Lawrence 
Funeral Home. / 2119 Post Rd., Darien, 
Ct. 06820. 

HAND-ELSER 

Gail P. Elser '74 to Raymond J. Hand 
'74. May 24. 1975, Church of the Abiding 
Presence at the Lutheran Theological 
Seminary, Gettysburg. Susquehannans in 
the wedding party included Janet Rice 
Maggi '74. Pamela Starkey Plude '74. 
Cynthia Wood '74. Harold Hand Jr. '74. 
Craig Bingman '75. David Allison x' 74 and 
Robert Jarjisian '75. Ray is in his second 
year at the seminary. / 531 Baltimore St., 
Gettysburg, Pa. 17325. 

HARDIE-FROST 

Elizabeth O. Frost '69 to William Har- 
die. May 31. 1975. Baptist Church of the 
Great Valley, Devon, Pa. Mr. Hardie is a 
graduate of Drexel University and the bride 
is a programmer with Keystone Computer. 
BRATTON-KRECKMAN 

Phyllis A. Kreckman '74 to Timothy L. 
Bratton. June 7, 1975. Church of the 
Redeemer. Bryn Mawr. Pa. Phyllis is 
study ing for her master's and the groom is a 
doctoral candidate, both at Bryn Mawr 
College. He is w ith the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. / 700 Panmure Rd.. Haver- 
ford. Pa. 19041. 

JACKSON-GRUBB 

Susan E Grubb '75 to Christopher S. 
Jackson, June 7, 1975, in a garden 
ceremony at the home of the bride's parents 
in Selinsgrove. Susan is a teacher in 
Selinsgrove. Mr. Jackson attended Emer- 
son College, Boston, and is manager of the 
Hotel Governor Snyder. Selinsgrove. / 405 
S. High St.. Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 
HADLEY-SMITH 

Sharon K Smith '75 to John C. Hadlev 



'74. June 14, 1975, Meditation Chapel, 
Susquehanna University. Chaplain Edgar 
S. Brown performed the ceremony. Janet 
Selden x'75 was maid of honor and Coleen 
Warn Bidetspach '72 was organist. John is a 
newsman and announcer at WCNR Radio, 
Bloomsburg. / 272 W. 4th St.. 
Bloomsburg. Pa. 17815. 

KANOUSE-MILLER 
Billye Jean Miller '75 to Kevin S. 
Kanouse '75. June 14, 1975, Good 
Shepherd Lutheran Church. Berwick, Pa. 
Lena Zehner '75 was soloist and members 
of the wedding party were Kathleen Phillips 
'75. Stephen Pecha '75. Thomas Keane '75. 
Harold Letter '75. Linda Barran '76. 
Roberta Laudenslager '75 and Carol 
\ichols '75. Kevin is starting his first year 
in the Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg. / Old Heiges Hall, Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa. 
17325. 

LENZ-LAMBERT 
Judy L Lambert '65 to Lt. Douglas C. 
Lenz, June 14, 1975, Trinity Lutheran 
Church. Westminster, Pa. Attendants were 
Barbara Lambert x'74. Debra Maurer '75. 
and Kathleen Pickering '75. Lt. Lenz is a 
graduate of the U.S. Military Academy. / 
241 B Matheson Rd.. Columbus. Ga. 
31903. 

MADISON-MARKLE 
Ann E. Markle to Dean Madison '74. 
June 21, 1975, St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 
Spring Grove. Pa. Douglas Brinkman '74 
was best man. Mrs. Madison is a graduate 
of Brandy« ine College and was a buyer for 
S. Grumbacher & Son. Dean is a southern 
regional manager of Union Products. / 81 
Twiggs Cor.. Peachtree City, Ga. 30269. 

PARIS-BARNES 

Jane A. Barnes '73 to Francis J. Paris, 
June 21. 1975, Presentation B.V.M. 
Church. Penn Wynne, Pa. Susan Neiser 
'74. Susan Gordon '75 and Teresa 
Rhoderick Bowers '73 were attendants: 
Priscilla Hall '74 was soloist. Mr. Paris is a 
graduate of Temple University and both 
are teachers in the Interboro school district. 
/ Apt. E-7. 940 N. Providence Rd., Media. 
Pa. 19063. 

EICKHOFF-HANSEN 

Deborah J. Hansen '75 to Richard H 
Eickhojj '74, June 21, 1975, Watchung 
Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, N.J. 
Attendants were Pamela Shay Eickhoff 
"3. Karl W Eickhoff '73. Paul Blume '75. 
Patrick Kreger '76, and Elizabeth Walsh 
'76. Susan Wright '72 was organist and 
Ingeborg Biosevas '76 was soloist. Debbie 
is a teacher in the Bordentown City school 
district and Rick is manager for Shop 'n' 
Bag G-34. 1970 New Rodgers Rd., Levit- 
town. Pa. 19056. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



N-O-S-T-A-L-G-l-A 


How long has it been since you — 


Laughed out loud, 


Heard a clock ticking, 


Heard an eagle scream, 


Heard a new born baby cry, 


Made "home made" taffy. 


Heard a whippoorwill. 


Cuddled a puppy in your arms, 


Tasted a chestnut, 


Heard sleigh bells ringing, 


Said to someone "1 love you," 


Were stung by a bumble bee, 


Felt like humming a tune, 


Heard a hoot owl, 


Had a dinner of frog legs, 


Had a piece of fresh peach pie, 


Said to someone "I'll help you," 


Had a tooth ache, 


Took a good look at a full moon, 


Heard someone snore, 


Made a popgun out of an elder stalk, 


Got a splinter in your finger, 


Had buckwheat cakes and sausage for breakfast, 


Saw a five dollar bill on the offering plate, 


Splashed your bare feet in a cool mountain stream, 


Went horseback riding, 


Ate a piece of home-made bread, 


Said "Let's stay home tonight," 


Heard a church bell ring, 


Smelled pickalilly cooking, 


Said "Thank you Lord," 


Picked wild huckleberries, 


Visited a sick friend, 


Heard wild geese honking, 


Said "I'm sorry," 


Filled the cookie jar, 


Said, "Please," 


Said "Come over for Sunday dinner," 


Saw a groundhog in a meadow, 


Tipped the paper boy, 


Smelled new mown hay. 


Kissed your nurse, 


Had your blood pressure taken, 


Helped wash the dishes, 


Heard a blacksmith's hammer on the anvil, 


Said "You're a good girl," 


Have seen a bed bug, 


Felt like running away from home, 


Heard a train whistle in the night, 


Bought something silly? 


Have been to a Sunday School picnic, 




Saw a humming bird. 


(The brain child of my 80th birthday) 


Had a bouquet of sweet peas, 




Heard a rooster crow, 


—EARL MOHNEY '17 



DOWNS-EUSTICE 
Christine M. Eustice x'77 to Bruce W. 
Downs '74. June 21, 1975, St. Alban's 
Episcopal Church, Syracuse, N.Y. Sus- 
quehannans in the wedding party were 
Stephen Kramm '74, Jerry Basset '75 and 
Dennis Shoemaker '76. Chris is with Syrian 
Shrine and Bruce is a graduate assistant at 
the University of Cincinnati./ 127 Calhoun 
St.. Cincinnati, Ohio 45219. 

HILL-PRATZ 
Linda Pralz '74 to Jesse Hill 111 '75. June 
28, 1975, Bethany Lutheran Church, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. Attendants were Warren 
Diggins '75. Peter Douglas '74. Michael 
Falkner x'75, Debra Horner Douglas '74. 
Deborah Mathias '75 and Christine 
Schmidt '74. Linda is with the Selinsgrove 
school district and Jesse is regional infor- 
mation coordinator for the Nutrition 
Program in the Office on Aging. / Box 26, 
R.D. I, Winfield. Pa. 17889. 

WALTMAN-WHITMOYER 
Sharon K. Whitmoyer to William J. 
Waltman x'78. June 28, 1975, Faith 
Chapel, White Deer, Pa. Both are attending 
Idaho State University. / Pocatello, Ida. 
83201. 



WOLF-ROUSH 

Ellen S. Roushx'78 to Kenneth E. Wolf, 
July 12. 1975, Paradise United Methodist 
Church, Port Trevorton. Pa. / R.D. 1, Port 
Trevorton, Pa. 17864. 

TAGLIAFERRI-PFLEEGOR 

Kathy S. PJleegor x'75 to Albert F. 
Tagliaferri, July 19. 1975. St. Andrew 
Lutheran Church, Muncy, Pa. Stephanie 
Sims '75 and Jessica Schnilman '75 were 
attendants. Mr. Tagliaferri is with the 
Sycamore Manor Nursing Home. 



Born Crusaders 



To James and Bonnie Bucks Reece '65. a 
daughter, Chloe Suzanne, April 26, 1974. 
Mr. Reece is on the faculty at the Universi- 
ty of Michigan and Bonnie works part-time 
for the College Entrance Examination 
Board. / 470 Huntingdon Dr., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 48104. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Milton Kuhn '65. a 
daughter, Kirsten, June 1974. Milt is 
territory manager for Pharmaseal Division 
of American Hospital Supply. / 1004 



Trickling Brook Rd., Cockeysville, Md. 
21030. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Wolf 67. a 
son. David Philip, October 20, 1974. 
Richard is a production chemist with 
Armstrong Cork Co. / 2314 Beacon Hill 
Rd., Lancaster, Pa. 17601. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ira Rilzman '64. a 
daughter, Jennifer Marie, December 2, 
1974. Ira is a technician with RCA. / R.D. 
1, Box 83 C, Paradise. Pa. 17562. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Schmidt '69, a 
second son, Todd Edward, December 3. 
1974. Ed is an attorney associated with 
John M. Pendergrass. / 419 O'Keefe St., 
Cassapolis, Mich. 49031. 

To Bruce R '71 znAJune Ross Bengtson 
'72. a son, Michal Ross, December 30, 

1974. Bruce is a sales representative for 
Panasonic. Baltimore Region. / 561 Manor 
Rd., Severna Park, Md. 21 146. 

To Richard '70 and Joan Burgess Clout- 
man '71 . a son, Andrew Scott, February 20, 

1975. Chuck is a pool consultant with 
Colony Pool Service, Wilmington, Del. / 
25 1 Chestnut Ave., Glen Riddle, Pa. 19037. 

To Denis and Patricia Goel: Brenan '62. 
their fifth child, a daughter, Kelly 
Maureen, February 21, 1975. / 6412 



SUMMER 1975 



17 



Church Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 19151. 

To Gary H. '68 and Linda Melzel 
Manifold '70. a son, Chad Michael, April 3, 
1975. Gary is a senior systems analyst with 
Johnson & Johnson. / 257 A Woodland 
Way, Whitehouse Station, N.J. 08889. 

To H Laurence '70 and Christine 
Richards Kyse '69, their second child, a 
son, Andrew Laurence, April 25, 1975. 
Larry is assistant controller of Ipco 
Hospital Supply Co., Piscataway, N.J. / 37 
Raleigh Rd., Kendall Park, N.J. 08824. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Philip Welsh, a 
daughter. Shannon Leigh, April 26, 1975. 
Father is manager of the food service at 
Susquehanna for M. W. Wood Co. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward K. McCor- 
mick, a son Ryan Charles, April 28, 1975. 
Mr. McCormick is director of financial aid 
at Susquehanna. 

To Dr. Peter W. and Ellen Hill Owen '68, 
their first child, a son, Patrick McCabe, 
May I, 1975. / 1407 W. St. Andrews Rd., 
Midland, Mich. 48640. 

To Robert G. Jr. '69 and Donna Hilton 
Fisher '69, their second child, Douglas 
Howe, May 11, 1975. Bob is associated 



with the Masonite Corp. / 508 3rd St.. 
Towanda, Pa. 18848. 

To Guerrino and Susann McAuliffe 
Lucas '66. a daughter, Stacy Ann, May 22, 
1975. / 1 1 77 Westmoreland Blvd., Port St. 
Lucie. Fla. 33452. 

To John C. '72 and Karen Xobel Kupp 
'71. their first child, a daughter, Tracey 
Noelle, May 24, 1975. John is an elemen- 
tary instrumental music teacher in Bergen- 
field, N.J. / 273 Hillcrest Ave., Wood- 
Ridge. N.J. 07075. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Entenmann 
Jr. '71 . a son Derek Thomas, June 10, 1975. 
Tom is a buyer for Clover, a division of 
Straw-bridge & Clothier, Philadelphia. / 
463 Conger Ave., Collingswood, N.J. 
08108. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gresh '66, a 
daughter, Jennifer Eileen, June 13, 1975. / 
293 7th Street, Northumberland, Pa. 
17857. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Cortland "Joe" Hal- 
field '65. a son. Brian Keith, June 23, 1975. 
Dad heads the English department at 
Clarkstown Jr. H.S., West Nyack, N.Y. / 
628 Blue Hill Rd„ River Vale, N.J. 07675. 



Deaths 



Frank A. Bennardi '35. Williamsport. 
Pa., February 9, 1963. He was a business- 
man in Williamsport. 

Elmer J Deveraux '35. Wilmington, 
Del., January 15, 1974. He retired in 1971 
after teaching 33 years at Wilmington H.S. 

Virginia Ulsh Barnes '29. Millerstown, 
Pa., June 21, 1974. She was the widow of 
Seiber Troutman '29 who died in 1954. 

Parke H Lut:. 1918 graduate of Penn 
State University who did graduate work at 
Susquehanna in the '20s, Denver, Pa., 
March 16, 1975. He was retired as ex- 
ecutive vice president of Holt, Rinehart & 
Winston Inc. and active in church and civic 
affairs. 

Jacob L. Brake '27. Mercersburg, Pa., 
April 10, 1975. He retired in 1962 after 
serving 44 years as a teacher in the James 
Buchanan jointure. He was a member of St. 
Stephen's Lutheran Church. 

Robert W. MacQuesten. Esq. x'42. Ho- 
Ho-Kus, N.J., April 26, 1975. He was a 
graduate of Rutgers University and Dickin- 
son Law School and was an attorney and 
Municipal Court judge. A veteran of World 
War II, he was active in the Community 
Church. Among his survivors is a brother, 
Col. Frederic G. MacQuesten x'43. 

Mary Young VanKirk, Charlotte, N.C., 
May 3, 1975. She was the wife of Theodore 



VanKirk x'42 and mother of Fred L. 
VanKirk x'77. 

Ruth C. Cassler x'll. Johnstown, Pa., 
May 1 0, 1 975. She was an assistant cashier 
at Peoples National Bank, State College, 
and was a member of Grace Lutheran 
Church. Susquehannans among her sur- 
vivors are brothers Ernest B. Cassler '20 
and the Rev. Dr. Henry H Cassler '34. 

Henry T. Ortlieb, Rydal, Pa., May 13, 
1975. President of Henry F. Ortlieb 
Brewing Co., he was the father of Henry A. 
Ortlieb x'70. 

Anne Harper Yorty, Williamsport, Pa., 
May 21, 1975. She was the widow of Ernest 
T. Yorty, business manager at Susquehan- 
na until his death in 1951. She is survived by 
a daughter. Anne >'. Lamade '49, widow of 
John B. Lamade '51. 

Charles H. Walter '36. Selinsgrove, Pa., 
May 23, 1975. He retired in 1974 as head 
of the accounting department at the Selins- 
grove State School and Hospital after 38 
years of service and had a number of busi- 
ness interests in Snyder County. 

Irving L. Pratt Jr. .Selinsgrove, Pa., May 
24, 1975. He was the father of Robert S. 
Pratt '72. 

Matthew A. Waters '58. Langhorne. Pa., 
May 29. 1975. He received the M.A. from 
Temple University and was a teacher in the 



The Class of 1970 

holds its Reunion 

at Homecoming 

(see separate mailing) 



Pennsbury school district. He was active in 
a number of professional and fraternal 
organizations and a member of First 
United Methodist Church of Shenandoah. 

Dorothy McCormick Zechman '21. 
Lewisburg, Pa., June 1, 1975. She did 
graduate work at Penn State and was the 
wife of CM. Zechman '21 . She was active 
in women's clubs at the local and state level 
and held a number of offices. 

The Rev. Clarence C. Otto '37, Mt. Plea- 
sant Mills, Pa., June 12, 1975. He was a 
graduate of the Lutheran Seminary at Get- 
tysburg, was given the D.D. by Bob Jones 
University, and was pastor of St. John's 
Lutheran Charge, Richfield. He also served 
several other parishes in Pennsylvania and 
was with the Texas Mission Board for a 
number of years. 

Spurgeon J. Leber '26. Chambersburg, 
Pa., June 30, 1975. He was a sales represen- 
tative of Ginn & Co. He earned his master's 
in 1933 from Columbia University and was 
a member of several professional and 
fraternal groups. The Rev. Andrew H. 
Beahm '24 officiated at the funeral service. 

Calvin L. Sarver '30. Millerstown, Pa.. 
July 3, 1975. He operated a farm until his 
death and had taught for 37 years in the 
Greenwood schools until his retirement in 
1967. He was active in the farming com- 
munity and a member of St. Matthew's 
Lutheran Church. 

Calvin H Conrad III '49. Lutz, Fla., 
Jul) 4, 1975. A veteran of World War II, he 
w as music supervisor in the Tampa schools. 

Dr. Andrew W Cordier hc'68. Manhas- 
set, N.Y. , July 11, 1975. President emeritus 
of Columbia University and one-time dean 
of Columbia's Graduate School of Inter- 
national Affairs, he earlier spent 16 years as 
a top aide and troubleshooter at the United 
Nations. He was Under-Secretary to 
Secretaries General Trygve Lie and Dag 
Hammarskjold. but resigned after the 
latter's death in 1962 amid Soviet in- 
timations that he was also trying to run the 
entire U.N. singlehandedly. Educated at 
Manchester College, the University of 
Chicago and the Graduate Institute of 
International Affairs in Geneva, he taught 
at Manchester until going to the State 
Department during World War II and 
helping to organize the U.N. 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SU Sports 



by PETER SILVESTRI 



AMOS ALONZO STAGG SR„ as every reader of this 
column should know, concluded one of the longest and most 
illustrious coaching careers in the history of college football 
with six seasons at Susquehanna, 1 947-52, as co-coach of the 
Crusaders with his son A. A. Stagg Jr. 

In the NCAA College Football Modern Record Book, 
Stagg is listed first in all-time coaching victories with 314. 
And that total, the NCAA office says, doesn't even include 
his 21 victories at S.U. because of the co-coaching arrange- 
ment. The Staggs' 1951 team was undefeated and offensive 
center Jim Hazlett was named a Little Ail-American. Hazlett 
is now entering his 10th year as head football coach at S.U. 

Two years ago the NCAA established a national football 
championship playoff series for Division III (small colleges), 
culminating in the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl, named in honor 
of the Grand Old Man. Juniata College, our long-time rival, 
played in the first Stagg Bowl, losing to Wittenberg. In last 
year's Division III national championship. Central College of 
Iowa defeated Ithaca. The game is played each year in Phenix 
City, Alabama. 

All this is not meant as a history and geography lesson, 
but as a circuitous way of suggesting that there is no limit to 
the potential of the 1975 Crusader football team. While 
predicting a national championship would be a bit foolhardy, 
we can at least enjoy the luxury of thinking about the 
possibility of earning selection for the post-season title 
playoffs, which this year will be expanded from a four- to an 
eight-team format. And it certainly would be fitting for S.U. 
to play in the bowl game that bears the name of the famous 
former Crusader coach. 

Susquehanna achieved its first undefeated football cam- 
paign in 1932, and has had at least one in each decade since, 
through the 1960s. How about one for the 1970s? The 
coaching staff and players believe a 9-0 mark is a realistic 
goal, and a look at the material bears out that confidence. 

The Crusaders have 29 returning lettermen. A lot of 
other teams can boast a comparable figure, but not many can 
match the Crusader total of 1 8 players who have already won 
letters in two or more seasons. 

Hazlett says the offensive line is the best he's had. Tackle 
Gerry Huesken '77 (Palmyra, N.J.) and guard Mike 
Monahan '77 (Rockville, Md.) are among the best around. 
The backfield of Tim Lawlor '77 (Shillington. Pa.), Jim 
Camut '77 (Johnston, Pa.) and Paul O'Neill '78 (Stratford, 
N.J.) is good and can be better. None of our opponents has a 
receiver to match split end Jeff Steltz '76 (Wyomissing, Pa.). 
No foe will find it easy to score against the Crusader defense, 
anchored by tackle Pat Lowe '76 (Johnson City, N.Y.) and 
middle linebacker Joe LoCastro '76 (Barrington. N.J.). 



The only question mark is at the quarterback spot left 
vacant by Mike Buterbaugh '75, who set a school season 
record last fall with 92 pass completions. But even this 
problem could evaporate quickly if John Bird '76 
(Bloomsburg, Pa.) can stay healthy or if one of several highly 
regarded freshman prospects works out. The crucial factor 
here is one of leadership. Buterbaugh was well liked by the 
other players and this helped him run the offense. Hopefully 
the returning veterans have the maturity to learn to work with 
a new man. 

The Crusaders also lost, through graduation, record- 
setting placekicker and defensive end Chuck Smeltz, offen- 
sive tackle Bob Brett, safety Pete Rambo, and linebacker 
Mike Kennedy. But there is so much talent returning that 
they should not be missed seriously. 

The players know they are a better team than last year's 
4-5-1 record indicates, and they want to prove it. Coach 
Hazlett would like to make his 10th season at S.U. his best so 
far. 

The season opens at home on September 13 with the 
Crusaders entertaining Grove City in the 16th Annual Sun- 
bury Kiwanis Charities — Stagg Hat Trophy game. It will 
mark the sixth straight year S.U. has opened with Grove City. 
Susquehanna had to settle for a 14-14 tie with the Wolverines 
last year after scoring four straight wins. 

This year's Homecoming game on October 4 will be an 
important Middle Atlantic Conference contest against 
Lycoming. The Warriors expect to be stronger than the group 
that lost 30-18 to the Crusaders last year. 

Albright, which should be a contender for the MAC 
Northern Division title along with defending champ Wilkes, 
Juniata and S.U., will provide the opposition on Parents Day, 
October 18. The Crusaders resumed their series with the 
Lions last year after a 50-year lapse and dropped a close 14-9 
decision. 

The season concludes on November 8 with a home game 
against Waynesburg, which nipped S.U. 1 1-10 in 1974 on a 
last-minute field goal. 



Successful campaigns also appear forthcoming for the 
soccer, cross country and field hockey teams. 

The booters could use a little help on defense, but expect 
to score a lot of goals with the entire line returning from a 
team that tied the school record for goals in one season last 
fall with 28. Key returnees are lineman Kurt Kohler '76 
(Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich.) and coach Neil Potter, back 
after a year's sabbatical leave. 

The cross country team has everybody back and hopes to 
avoid the injuries that thinned the ranks last year. Ace runner 
Jeff Yoder '76 (Mt. Carmel, Pa.) was hurt last fall, but was 
healthy enough in the spring to break his own school record in 
the mile. 

The field hockey team hopes to make victory a habit 
after scoring the first winning season since 1962 last year. 
Leading returnee is high scoring Leslie Beers '76 (Springfield, 
Pa.). 



SUMMER 1975 



19 



THIS YEAR 

it's a Tailgate Pig Roast, 
Football vs Lycoming, 
Datestone Placing for 
the new Gym and Pool, 
and Max Morath, 
'The Ragtime Years" 




COME HOME FOR 
HOMECOMING OCTOBER 4 



ATTENTION PARENTS 

If this magazine is addressed to your son or 
daughter who no longer maintains a perma- 
nent address at your home, please clip off 
the bottom of this page, including the ad- 
dress label, and return it with the correct 
address to the Alumni Office at Susquehan- 
na University. Thank you kindly for 
helping us to update our records. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify If undeliverable. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



0;i 



Susquehanna Alumnus 



FALL 1975 



Featuring the President's Report for 1974-75 




Susquehanna University Rlumni Association 

Directory of Officers 1975-76 



George H. Bantley '41. 4998 Longview Dr . Murrysville. Pa. 15668 President 

William C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 1701 1 Vice President 

Robert L. Hackenberg 56, 2019 Hilltop Rd., Westfield. N.J. 07090 Vice President 

Signe S. Gales 71, 12000 Old Georgetown Rd., Apt. C-1407, Rockville, Md. 20852 

Recording Secretary 
Chester G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Douglas E. Arthur 49. 4696 N. Galen Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17110 

Representetive on University Board ot Directors 
Henry J. Keil '39. 581 Nordhoff Dr., Leonia. N. J. 07065 

Representative on University Board of Directors 
Edward S Rogers Jr. '42, 1629 S Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19067 

Representative on University Board ot Directors 
Samuel D. Ross '54, R. D. 8, Carlisle. Pa. 17013 

Representative on University Board ot Directors 
Raymond G. Hochstuhl '47. 44 Fairview Dr., E., Basking Ridge, N.J 07920 

Representative on University Board ot Directors 
Simon B. Rhoads '30, 300 Susquehanna Ave.. Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Representative to Intercollegiate Athletic Committee 
Louis F. Santangelo Jr. '50, 111 Cocoa Ave., Hershey. Pa. 17033 

Representative to Intercollegiate Athletic Committee 

Executive Board members-at-large. term expiring 1976 

Samuel D. Clapper '68, 145 Plank Rd., Apt 32. Somerset, Pa. 15501 
Alan C Lovell '70, 2312 Chetwood Cir , Apt 304. Timonium. Md. 21093 
James Gormley '55, 8615 Alicia St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 19115 
Lester C. Heilman Jr. '52, 244 Green Lane Dr , Camp Hill. Pa. 1701 1 
Franklin G. Smith '55, 1838 N. 21st St.. Allentown. Pa. 18104 



President 



LEHIGH VALLEY 

Dr, George A. Kirchner 64, 469 Manor Dr , Allentown, Pa. 18103 

Louise Brophy Arnold 72 (Mrs Robert). 37 S. 3rd St, Emmaus, Pa. 18049 

Secretary-Treasurer 



LEWISTOWN 

Harry B. Thatcher '41, South Hills. Lewistown. Pa 17044 
Sherman E Good '30. Railroad St. McClure. Pa. 17841 
Ruth Goff Nicodemus '30 (Mrs. Bryce E), 471 S. Main St. 



President 
Vice President 
Lewistown. Pa. 17044 

Secretary-Treasurer 



MOUNT CARMEL-SHAMOKIN 

Timothy E. Barnes '35. 251 N. Park St., Mount Carmel, Pa. 17851 
Dr James C. Gehns '50, 633 W. Chestnut St.. Shamokln. Pa. 17872 
S. John Price '42. 1435 Arch St.. Ashland. Pa. 17921 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

Alice Greeger Ptefter '51 (Mrs. Wm. M.). Trailwood. RD. 1. Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702 President 

Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St., Swoyersville, Pa 18704 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36, Rear 68 Division St., Kingston. Pa. 18704 Secretary-Treasurer 

NORTH NEW JERSEY 

Harold N. Johnson '54. 80 Old Sterling Rd., Warren Twp , N.J. 07060 Chairman 

Robert L Hackenberg '56. 2019 Hilltop Rd.. Westfield, N.J. 07090 Vice Chairman 



Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1977 

Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan '62 (Mrs. Robert M ), 236 Richards Rd., Ridgewood, N.J 07450 
Elwood M McAllister '49. RD. 1. Box 262. Parkland Ter., Allentown, Pa. 18102 
Virginia Carlson McKenzie '69 (Mrs. William G). Old Dorsey Rd.. Harmans, Md. 21077 
Neil R. Smith '63, Box 147. Warriors Mark. Pa. 16877 
James W. White '58, 413 N. George St., Millersville, Pa. 17551 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1978 
Timothy E Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St.. Mount Carmel, Pa. 17851 
Judith A. Blee '62. Beavertown. Pa. 17813 

Martha A. Fisher '73, 147 King George St., Annapolis, Md. 21401 
D Edgar Hutchison '34. 763 Vista Dr.. Camp Hill. Pa. 17011 
Gene L. Stock '56. 1921 Larch Ave., E. Petersburg, Pa. 17520 

District Club Organizations 

ALTOONA 

Mary Emma Yoder Jones '41 (Mrs. Marshall S ), RD 2, Box 297, Altoona. Pa 16601 President 
Christopher J. Gipe '66. 21 Sylvan Dr., Hollidaysburg, Pa 16648 Secretary-Treasurer 



PHILADELPHIA 

James J Gormley '55, 8615 Alicia St.. Philadelphia. Pa. 19115 President 

Marvel Cowling Robinson '53 (Mrs Franklin E), 309 Woodridge La., Media. Pa. 19063 

Corresponding Secretary 
Shirley A. Young '51. Fountainville, Pa. 18923 Recording Secretary 

Louise E. West '39, Seven Oaks East. Apt 627, 302 E. Marshall St, West Chester. Pa. 19380 

Treasurer 
Donald F. Wohlsen '50. Kenilworth La.. Ambler. Pa. 19002 Director 

James B. Norton III '64. Box 7. ML Airy Rd.. Coatesville. Pa. 19320 Director 

Kenneth R. Fish '63. 306 Ivy Rock La., Havertown, Pa. 19083 Director 

PITTSBURGH 

Thomas G. P. Roberts '68. 1735 Fairmont Ave.. New Kensington, Pa 15068 Chairman 

READING 

W. Frank Laudenslayer '39. 215 N. 6th St.. Box 311, Reading. Pa. 19603 President 

Dr Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. '49, 3051 Van Reed St., Sinking Spring, Pa. 19608 V/ce President 

William S. Whiteley '35. 1910 N. 15th St.. Reading. Pa. 19604 Secretary 

Richard Cahn '58. 464 Hill Rd., Wernersville, Pa. 19565 Treasurer 



BALTIMORE 



To be elected 



CALIFORNIA 

Dr. Robert N. Troutman '26. 434 W. 12th St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 



SOUTH JERSEY 

Thomas D. Samuel Jr. '63, 125 Bartram Rd.. Marlton. N.J. 08053 President 

Peggy Thoman Luscko'63(Mrs. JohnF.), 136 N. Lakeside Dr. E.. Medford. N.J. 08055 Secretary 
David J. Schumacher '64. 3103 Sheffield Dr.. Cinnaminson. N.J. 08077 Treasurer 

Charlotte Sandt Erdley '56 (Mrs. Kenneth F. Jr.), 302 Lenape Tr.. Wenonah. N. J 08090D/recror 
Douglas E Spotts '63, 1305 Columbia Ave., Cinnaminson. N.J. 08077 Director 

John F. Luscko '63, 136 N Lakeside Dr E , Medford, N.J. 08055 Director 



CENTRE-UNION 

James A Bonsall '34. 609 Beech St., Curwensville. Pa. 16833 President 
Lois Dauberman Schultz '48 (Mrs. Wm. £), 956 Tanney St.. Bellefonte. Pa. 16823 Vice President 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 

Carolyn L. Tritt '68, 1813 Alexander Ave . Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 President 

Paul Lucas '38. 1855 Scotland Ave.. Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 Vice President 

Susan Zelchner Hopple 66, 438 E. Queen St.. Chambersburg. Pa. 17201 Secretary 



SUSOUEHANNA VALLEY 

Barbara Brown Troutman '67 (Mrs David R). 410 N. 9th St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 1 7870 President 

Joseph W Kleinbauer '63, RD 1. Monroe Manor, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Vice President 

Arlene Laudenslager Hatton '31 (Mrs Francis), 624 N. 4th St, Sunbury. Pa. 17801 Secretary 

James C. Black '63. RD 1, Box 494, Fairway Dr , Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

WASHINGTON 

R Brent Swope '65, 11711 Castlewood Ct, Potomac. Md 20854 President 



HARRISBURG 

William C Davenport '53. 420 Deerfield Rd.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 President 

Jack K. Bishop '54. 415 Lexington Ct, Stafford Heights, Hershey. Pa. 17033 Vice President 
James R. Clark '46. 424 Parkside Rd.. Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 

Carol Ocker Kirk '65 (Mrs. Peter D). 5155 Kylock Rd., Mechanicsburg. Pa. 17055 Secretary 
Catherine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs Clayton K). 571 Walnut Rd.. Steelton. Pa. 17113 Treasurer 

JOHNSTOWN 

To be elected President 

John A. Topper '65. P.O. Box 554. Hyndman, Pa. 15545 Vice President 

Mary Llzzio Govekar '47 (Mrs Max A), P O Box 14, Elton, Pa. 15934 Secretary 

Thomas J Weible '23, 324 Orchard St.. Johnstown. Pa. 15905 Treasurer 



LANCASTER 

Richard E. '55 and Suzanne Beal McCarty x'57. 1810 Edenwald La.. Lancaster. Pa. 17601 

Chairman 



WILLIAMSPORT 
Donald S. King '66. 604 Montour St.. Montoursville. Pa. 17754 President 

Ruth Wheeland Wentz '38 (Mrs Fillmore HI. 1517 Warren Ave., Williamsport. Pa. 17701 

Secretary-Treasurer 

YORK-HANOVER 

Jerry E Egger '65 RD. 4. Box 107. Dover. Pa. 17315 President 

Jean Rowe Lauver '54 (Mrs. Orvllle H), 2040 E. Market St.. York. Pa. 17402 Secretary 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY-SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT 

Janet Leiteel Fairchild '32 (Mrs. Lee M). Old Croton Lake Rd.. Box 429, ML Klsco. NY 10549 

President 



)N OUR COVER: Gathering around Presi- 
ent Weber are these sons and daughters of 
lusquehanna alumni who enrolled in the class 
if 1979 (clockwise): Holly Maier (Esther Seit- 
inger Maier '41), White Haven, Pa.; Ruth 
ommel (George J. '38 and Dorothy Shutt 
ummel '40), Ashland, Pa.; Mary Knapp 
Albert C. Knapp '42), Odenton, Md.; Michael 
imith (Lawrence M. Smith '49), Freeburg, 
'a.; Richard Brown (Jack A. Brown '51), 
(asking Ridge, N.J.; Bruce Torok (Steven F. 
>3 and Joyce Wagner Torok '53), Southamp- 
sn. Pa.; Elizabeth Sheldon (Donald R. 
heldon '53), Silver Spring, Md. Others not 
resent for the photographer are Steven Ar- 
ogast (Ned M. Arbogast '54), Hollywood, 
la., and Jesse Shutt (William C. Shutt '60), 
"ollegeville. Pa. Also enrolled are 34 young 
eople w ho have other relatives among Univer- 
ity alumni! This speaks well indeed for what 
ur alumni think of their education at Sus- 
uehanna. While statistics show that today's 
ollege students to a large extent make their 
wn choices about what college they attend, 
ley also show that parents' opinions weigh 
ext most heavily. 

The Report of the President is the feature of 
lis issue. It was prepared with the help of 
lomer W. Wieder, vice president for develop- 
lent. It includes not merely a lot of facts of in- 
vest to alumni, but also a great deal of 
loughtfully-expressed philosophy about 
hat's going on at Susquehanna these days, 
nd why. If you have not been reading the an- 
ual President's Report, this is a good year to 
art doing so. 

As most of our readers know, Susquehanna 
related to the Lutheran Church in America, 
irough the Central Pennsylvania Synod. In 
le United States, many colleges were founded 
y church bodies; several hundred still regard 
lemselves as related to these bodies, although 
le definition of church-relatedness seems to 
efy standardization. In our case, the college is 
ot owned by the church — the Synod does elect 
ght members (four clergy and four lay) to our 
oard of Directors of between 40 and 50 
lembers. In attempting to define their church 
:lationship (which differs vastly across the 
ind) all 18 LCA colleges in the U.S. adopted 
jvenants with their supporting synods several 
:ars ago. Ours is summarized in "The 
ovenants" beginning on page 27. This, too. is 
srtinent reading for those who would know 
hat Susquehanna is about. 

— G.T. 






The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol.45 



FALL 1975 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

Directory of Officers Inside front cover 

Report of the President 1974-75 4 

Admissions, Students. Faculty, Development/ Finances, 
Donors. Statement, Board of Directors 

The Covenants 27 

Susquehannans On Parade 30 

Advanced Degrees 31 

Winter Sports Schedules 31 

"I Do" 32 

Born Crusaders 33 

Deaths 33 

Alumni Association Nominations 35 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writer 
PETER B. SILVESTRI 



Entered as second-class matter September 26. 1931. at the Post Office at 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. under the Act of August 24. 1912 Published lour times a 
year by Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove. Pa. 



FALL 1975 



Report 

o£the 

President 




introduction 



1974-75 



THIS YEAR'S President's Report will depart somewhat 
from previous years and highlight some of the events of the 
past academic year. In addition, I want to use this space to 
look forward to the next several years and to the changes 
which are in progress on the campus. It is quite unusual for a 
college president to be optimistic in this day and age. but I can 
report to alumni and friends with deep conviction that Sus- 
quehanna is stronger today than at any time during my 
tenure. Our operating budget of $6 million remains in 
balance; our faculty is stronger and more active than ever 
before; and, contrary to the condition of many sister in- 
stitutions, our applications for admission experienced some 
increase over last year. We anticipate perhaps the largest 
enrollment in our history this fall. 

American higher education has faced its greatest crisis in 
recent years. From the student unrest of the late 1960s and 
early 1 970s over Vietnam and the relevance of post-secondary 
education inadecliningjob market to the current inflationary 
pressure which has threatened to change both the nature and 
character of many institutions — Susquehanna has faced these 
conditions head on, and it is my considered judgment that, 
these external forces notwithstanding, this University is a 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 






President Gustave W. Weber at this 

year's gathering of freshmen and their 

parents. At Susquehanna since February 1, 

1959, his administration is the third 

longest in the University's 117 years, 

exceeded only by those of Dr. G. Morris Smith 

(1928-59) and Dr. Charles T. Aikens (1905-27). 






better and more viable institution today than at any time in its 
long and prominent history. 

Although the pressures cited above give pause for con- 
cern and place additional demands on faculty and staff to 
rethink traditional and cherished ways of doing things, a far 
greater threat to higher education and to society rests in the 
need for use to reaffirm the moral commitment on which this 
great land's heritage is based. While Vietnam and inflation 
have been serious problems, the undercutting of this country's 
moral fiber by supposedly intelligent government leaders and 
businessmen is of greater long range significance. Watergate 
was perhaps only symptomatic of an even deeper disregard 
for the values of our society, just as the recent disclosures of 
questionable business practices and political payments, both 
foreign and domestic, tend to jeopardize the free enterprise 
system. One would not be as concerned if many of those in- 
volved were not leaders in our political and business com- 
munities. One would also be more inclined to rationalize such 
actions if many involved were not the products of our better 
educational institutions. The end result can only further 
weaken public confidence in American political and business 
establishments and, if allowed to continue, could in the end be 



the demise of the free enterprise system — and even freedom 
itself. Much of the responsibility for correcting this moral 
deficiency and lapse in our society must rest with the system 
of higher education. We are looked to to provide society with 
leaders possessing an ability to differentiate between what is 
acceptable and unacceptable, between what is to be valued 
and what is to be questioned, and to inculcate in students a 
grasp of the moral and ethical consequences of their actions 
that will permit them to avoid the kind of national crisis we 
have just experienced and are still experiencing. It is my con- 
tention that a liberal arts-oriented, church-related college is 
especially equipped to carry out this mission. 

Each year students come to Susquehanna with the expec- 
tation of developing a better understanding of the complex 
issues and problems with which they are confronted with in- 
creasing frequency. The contradictory and complex nature of 
these problems requires solutions and decisions based on a 
variety of choices, among often conflicting priorities. The 
ability to decide among various options determines whether 
or not the technology we have created and shall create will be 
our master. Our grasp of the moral and ethical consequences 
of our actions is the strength we need to help us avoid 



FALL 1975 



^MISSIONS 

01 St. 




debilitating national crises. We have learned the hard way 
that pure professional competence is a house of sand if it is ac- 
companied by moral callousness. This awareness of a 
"completeness" which is necessary in higher education attests 
to the need for and the value of a liberal arts-oriented 
curriculum. And in continuing to believe in career orientation 
taught within the framework of a liberal education, the 
University acknowledges that there is more to living than 
merely earning a living. 

The basic and overriding question to be asked is: "To 
what degree do Susquehanna-graduated students meet stan- 
dards of quality and integrity?" Evaluation of professional 
preparation can be made without much difficulty and, in 
Susquehanna's case, this has been found to be most satisfac- 
tory as measured by traditional yardsticks. To what degree 
pure professional competence is balanced with an under- 
standing of the totality of man's experience and a sense of 
ethics and morality is much more difficult to answer. This 
speaks directly to the character of the institution. 

As such, Susquehanna serves a unique role in American 
society. Through tradition and design, Susquehanna in- 
culcates in students that man does not live by technology and 
material comfort alone. The University combines with other 
vital forces in society — family, church and community — to 
produce citizens of informed and well disciplined intelligence 
capable of making sound ethical and moral judgments in a 
complex world. 

The liberal arts, as a basis for all education, have shown 
themselves to be capable of withstanding the test of time and 
of integrating and assimilating those elements of continuity 
and change that are worthwhile. To quote from John Stuart 
Mill: "Men are men before they are lawyers, or physicians, or 
merchants, or manufacturers; and if you make them capable 



and sensible men, they will make themselves capable and sen- 
sible lawyers and physicians." 

As a church-related college, Susquehanna is capable of 
graduating responsible individuals who exhibit through their 
personal lives and public actions an understanding for the 
social, political and moral consequences involved. The 
church-related school has the greatest capability of placing 
the Church at the center of the institution's life and activity 
and of overcoming the present day tendency to value neutrali- 
ty. More than any other institution, the church-related liberal 
arts college can best help society arrest the disintegration of 
its value system and meet the challenge from both seculariza- 
tion and excessive specialization. Susquehanna realizes that 
most times this goal is achieved imperfectly and even acciden- 
tally. While such an admission must give us reason to pause 
and to reexamine our academic programs and commitment 
to serious and effective teaching in the classroom, we should 
not apologize for the objectives themselves. Instead, these 
reasons for continued commitment to mission must be 
restated with emphasis. In addition, we must continue to have 
the will to carry out the goals both of liberal education and of 
our particular constituency in order to have the chance to sur- 
vive the pressures of the contemporary scene. 




g q^ 



Gustave W. Weber 
President 



September 1975 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



admissions 



THE UNIVERSITY'S ABILITY to attract students con- 
tinues to remain stable, in spite of national trends which 
depict some erosion of enrollments at the private colleges. 
Surveys indicate that fewer than half of the private colleges 
and universities had enrollment increases last fall. It would 
seem that Susquehanna's ability to attract and retain a full 
complement of students results from several important fac- 
tors including: a broader acceptance of the University's 
academic reputation among graduating high school students 
and their guidance counselors; the University's determina- 
tion to keep costs moderate and within reach of potential 
students from various socio-economic backgrounds; the addi- 
tion of a fourth member to the Admissions staff. Of 
overriding importance, however, is the academic reputation 
which Susquehanna has developed in recent years along with 
our ability to offer the type of educational experience popular 
among a growing number of prospective students. 

As of this writing in mid-summer, the University has 
processed over 1 185 applications for admission for the fall of 
1975. This represents about a five percent increase over last 
year. We expect a freshman class of 400 to enroll and we 
further expect the total enrollment of the University to again 
exceed 1400. The Admissions Office visited over 300 high 
schools during the past year and this effort reflects itself in the 
geographical distribution of the student body. Students in the 
incoming freshman class will again represent about 15 states 
and several foreign countries. This pleases us, since 
geographical spread helps provide a more enlightened 
educational atmosphere on campus. 

Inflationary pressures continue to deal a severe blow to 
many colleges as they fight to retain a cost-competitiveness. 
Although Susquehanna has raised its cost by about $300 for 
the next year and tuition will be $2500 annually, we still rank 
twelfth among 16 competing colleges in terms of costs. We 
are doing all that we can to remain within the reach of all 
students from all economic backgrounds. Several months ago 
the parents of 733 Susquehanna students received a question- 
naire from students conducting a marketing survey for a 
project in a business course. Information was sought on how 
these parents perceived the quality and cost of Susquehanna 
University versus other competing schools. Based on 335 
anonymous responses, the median family income of Sus- 
quehanna parents was $23,000. This is well above the median 
family income in the United States. A family income of 
$15,000-$25,000 is considered upper middle class. In one 
sense, these figures are disturbing, since they may be inter- 
preted to mean that only the more affluent can afford to at- 
tend the University. On the other hand, our own analysis 
shows that over 60 percent of our students attend Susquehan- 
na with some form of financial aid. We also know that a 



significant number of our students come from families with 
incomes of under $12,000. A top priority must be given to 
retaining this diversity of income groups within the student 
body. Not only is geographical spread preferable, but the 
benefits of students from all walks of life and socio-economic 
backgrounds living and working together brings a 
cosmopolitan flavor to campus which is highly desirable. We 
will, therefore, place great emphasis on expanding sources of 
financial aid available to all students. 

Each year the Admissions Office asks our incoming 
freshmen to fill out a form indicating those factors believed to 
have influenced their selection of Susquehanna as their 
college. Ranking high in terms of importance were the 
academic reputation of the college in general and the reputa- 
tion of their specific field of interest in particular; the size of 
the school and the location of Susquehanna in proximity to 
their home. We also ask them to what other colleges they 
made application, and among the schools most prominently 
listed were Bucknell, Gettysburg, Grove City, Lycoming, 
Muhlenberg and Penn State. 

A major factor throughout the country is the declining 
scores of students on the College Board tests. Each year the 
national averages deteriorate from 8 to 15 points. Between 
1967 and 1974, the number of high school juniors and seniors 
scoring above 700 on the verbal SAT test fell by half — down 
from approximately 32,000 in 1967. The number of students 
scoring above 600 fell by a third. Susquehanna has ex- 
perienced these normal drops among its candidates for ad- 
mission, although almost 80 percent of those offered admis- 
sion continue to come from the upper two-fifths of their 
graduating secondary school classes. Whether the trend in 
declining SAT scores will continue and what has caused it 
thus far remain unanswered questions. One theory is that the 
tests have become more difficult; another is that there are 
more students now taking the tests. Neither theory seems to 
satisfy the experts. A conclusion might be that there has been 
a decline in the developed reasoning ability of students as 
measured by the SATs. This could point to a declining 
emphasis on verbal and reading skills at pre-college levels. In 
any event, the decline in reading and writing abilities of in- 
coming students poses a particular problem for all colleges 
that is nationwide in scope. 

Susquehanna has decided to attack this matter of 
declining literacy head-on. We know that our students are 
well motivated and that some begin college at a distinct ad- 
vantage, particularly if they are proficient in reading and 
writing. We know, too, that even those with deficiencies can 
be brought to a sufficient level of competency by special 
programs during the freshman year — programs that stress 
grammar, thought analysis, and the ability to read and write 
critically. We have initiated such programs for our students, 
even though Susquehanna's average SAT scores of 480 (men) 
and 510 (women) are well above average. We are convinced 
that a solid grounding in fundamentals will enable our 
students to improve their proficiency and do better work at 
the junior and senior levels. This can only lead to a better 
educational experience for all students. 



FALL 1975 




Each year, an Orientation Committee of upperclass 

men and women comes back to campus a week early to be on hand 

when freshmen arrive— to move them and their belongings 

into dormitories, indoctrinate them about campus life, see 

to it that they are assigned mailboxes and meet the 

laundry people, and help administer a battery of placement tests. 



I 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



students 



THE ATTEMPT TO GIVE a broad and all-inclusive 
description of a "student body" could, at one time, be ac- 
complished with a degree of certainty. Today, however, we 
can no longer consider the student body a homogeneous 
group with like characteristics and aspirations. Granted, 
there is still the traditional majority of 17- to 21-year-olds 
who dominate campus life, but even their goals and 
aspirations are more individualistic in nature than a few years 
ago. There are other constituencies on campus — groups of 
students who are older and who tend to drop in and out of 
college while pursuing an education and holding down a 
fulltime job, and others with the more limited educational 
objective of achieving added status in employment or in their 
personal lives. The college campus today is providing more 
ways for a greater number of students to pursue educational 
opportunities. In addition to Susquehanna's daytime un- 
dergraduate program, the University has forcefully made an 
impact in the region by offering a wide range of evening and 
adult education courses for more than 250 area residents. An 
Associate degree program with a major in the arts or in 
applied science (business) now enrolls about 40 and offers 
another dimension to Susquehanna's goal of providing for the 
educational needs of the region. This diversity of goals and in- 
terests of students has, I am convinced, made Susquehanna a 
more viable educational institution. To be able to award a 
grandmother her undergraduate degree in music, to offer 
Certificates in Management through the evening program to 
shop foremen and supervisors so that they might be promoted 
to higher managerial positions, and to see the housewife with 
four youngsters return to college to pursue studies of special 
interest to her — these are the satisfactions in higher education 
today as more of our citizens consider education a lifelong 
process and not simply confined to a certain term or to a given 
number of courses. 

Our major effort, of course, continues to focus on the 
needs of our fulltime undergraduate enrollment of 1400. As I 
have indicated in earlier reports, the role of the student per- 
sonnel office continues to evolve in such a way as to meet 
changing student needs. The dissolution of the;>i loco paren- 
tis role of colleges which emphasized the custodial and dis- 
ciplinary duties of a dean of students has been replaced by 
greater emphasis on counseling and advising. In this sense, 
the student personnel role complements the academic func- 
tion in that individual student problems often encompass 
decisions influencing career and professional plans. 

The University has always tried to emphasize to students 
the value of a liberal arts education as the most effective 
preparation for life. Regardless of professional or vocational 
interests of students, the liberal arts base provides a solid 
foundation for specialized concentration in a major field of 



interest. During the past several years the emphasis in the 
media about a scarcity of teaching positions and other oc- 
cupational specialties for which the liberal arts major has 
traditionally trained has raised the question in the minds of 
many students: "What does one do with a liberal arts 
education?" The more vocationally trained un- 
dergraduates — those in music, business, accounting and the 
sciences — have, to this point, not been subjected to the severe 
pressures of the more broadly educated liberal arts majors. 
We would hope that the recovery of the economy will reverse 
this inequity, but even over the long haul indications are that 
the number of college graduates in the next few years will ex- 
ceed the number of jobs requiring their skills by about 800,- 
000. Susquehanna and its Placement Office have had good 
success in placing students, in spite of the downward trend of 
the economy in recent years. There are steps being taken on 
campus which will make the Susquehanna graduate even 
more competitive in the marketplace. 

Career Conferences are held annually with special 
emphasis on attracting students in the lower classes, although 
members of all classes do attend the sessions. The objective is 
to make all students aware of the need to plan for their future 
careers. An additional major step we have in mind is the in- 
troduction of a course in "career planning." Information on 
vocational and professional areas, students' interests and ap- 
titudes will be studied as the student keeps his own goals in 
focus. Thus, a student inclined toward history may be made 
aware of the many areas in which historians are employed, or 
encouraged to seek some elective business courses to make 
the educational background more attractive to employers. 

In extreme cases, changing the academic area of interest 
may be desired, since a student's professional goal may de- 
mand other preparation. For some students the course will 
merely be affirmation of their original career goals. 

The University does not overemphasize career prepara- 
tion, but we are convinced that a liberal arts base in combina- 
tion with career preparation can serve as an adequate educa- 
tion for many students. The future holds more leisure time for 
all of us. Experts tell us that many jobs will become less 
rewarding as technological advances consume more and 
more of the challenge of the various occupations. Asa result, 
there is an even greater urgency that the employee of 
tomorrow be broadly educated to find increasing satisfaction 
from his leisure time pursuits and from his involvement in 
non-occupational activities. Boredom, we are told, will 
become an even greater concern to society as the years pass. 
In this sense, then, those grounded in the liberal arts with 
broad-based interests will be best equipped to cope with the 
changing nature of our society. 

Several significant changes in other areas of student life 
should be noted. The trend of students to live off-campus, 
which we witnessed during the early part of this decade, has 
reversed itself. We now find our housing under severe 
pressure and overcrowded as more of our students desire to 
live on campus. This reversal results from the increasing cost 
of off-campus living as well as from an easing of social restric- 
tions within our housing units on campus. 



FALL 1975 



A more equal distribution of financial aid resources for 
male and female athletes, equal access to facilities and 
programs and comparable social regulations for both men 
and women are now mandated by the Federal Government. 
In the case of Susquehanna, an apparent neglect was the 
amount of time allocated to our women in Alumni Gym- 
nasium for their participation in intramural and inter- 
collegiate activities. Space precluded an equitable distribu- 
tion of time for a program that was overwhelmingly in favor 
of the men. This condition will be corrected with the erection 
of the new physical education building and with greater 
emphasis on our women's sports programs. 

A final point about the physical education building 
should be made. The physical, spiritual and intellectual needs 
of our students are so interrelated that a deficiency in any one 
of these areas tends to inhibit the development of the total 
person. The need for a modern and functional physical educa- 
tion facility may be viewed with the same urgency and impor- 
tance to our liberal arts philosophy as any other major 
building on the campus. With its completion in the fall of 
1976, we will be able to emphasize the development of the 
body, stress lifelong sports, and complete the physical evolu- 
tion of the campus which began with the erection of Heilman 
Hall in 1958. 

1 continue to marvel at the quality of Susquehanna's 
students and their maturity. We believe that the educational 
opportunities available to these students equal those of our 
competitors. Our graduates confirm this faith as more and 
more of them leave Selinsgrove and make their mark in a 
chosen profession. 



faculty 




MUCH TALK IN THE MEDIA today would lead one to 
suspect that the American dream might be dead and, if not, at 
least in critical condition. Frequently enough to be a bit an- 
noying. I have heard members of my generation say. "I think 
children born 50 years ago could look forward to a better 
future than my children can." Much of the talk centered 
around the type of world and the caliber of society their sons 
and daughters would inhabit. This put-down of America has 
become common among groups of supposedly learned peo- 
ple. It seems fashionable to criticize, throw up our hands in 
despair and rationalize that those problems we face are of 
such proportion that solutions are improbable. I would con- 
cur with Thomas Griffith, who writes in a recent Bicentennial 
issue of Fortune:". . . yet, the despair seems to be premature. 
A persuasive case can be made that if the American dream is 
dead, or dormant, it is because the dream of the fathers has 
been mostly realized, while the dream of the sons has not yet 
been successfully formulated." Griffith also points out that 
dreams achieved become mundane. The achievements bring 
new problems. Are these sons prepared to formulate new 
dreams? 

American education can look back on a decade of un- 
paralleled growth and achievement. Students were in abun- 
dance and an element of the American dream — making 
higher education within the reach of all — took a giant step 
closer to reality. We became enamored with our own success 
to the point of becoming somewhat complacent about the real 
role and limits of education. Education, it was emphasized, 
was a sure cure and had solutions to all problems facing the 
world. As we entered the late '60s and early '70s our security 
was shattered by the unrest of students dissatisfied with social 
and world issues certainly, but also evidencing a major dis- 
enchantment with the higher educational system itself. The 
smugness and self assurance which typified the college faculty 
member and administrator of the previous decade gave way 
to doubt and an uncertainty of purpose. Many institutions 
acquiesced to student and societal demands for hasty changes 
in an effort to implement something more "relevant." We 
temporarily lost sight of the true role of education which 
teaches values, thought processes and critical analysis 
through historical perspective while opting for the more 
modern and temporary expediencies. 

These whims, pressures and desires were present on the 
Susquehanna campus, too, but to a much lesser extent than 
one would expect. Our goal has always been to emphasize the 
liberal arts as a necessary focal point for all educational pur- 
suits and, although challenged, it did survive the pressures of 
those times. 

As the recent Middle States evaluation pointed out, if 
Susquehanna had one major fault it was that it had perhaps 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




remained too traditional during this period. Hindsight tells us 
that our adherence to the traditional was correct, but that 
more attention needed to be directed toward integrating into 
this traditional curriculum new methods of teaching, more 
opportunities for our students to test their theories and con- 
cepts, and greater concern for the integration of academic 
departments into cross-disciplinary programs in which 
students could acquire a broader perspective. Perhaps a ma- 
jor portion of the thinking that the American dream is dead 
results from the two diverse educational axes which have per- 
vaded our institutions in recent years. On the one hand is the 
technological or super-specialized education thrust upon us 
by the advent of Sputnik in the late 1950s and carried over to 
today. At the other extreme is the purely theoretical educa- 
tion of the liberal arts which, if considered alone, often results 
in disillusionment when the ideal proves unattainable in real 
life. We should have these worthy ideals and we should first 
learn to think critically, and this is the value of the liberal arts. 
But beyond that, we should also have a perspective which 
associates the ideal with the every day and which tempers 
thought to the more pragmatic and realistic needs of society 
and to what can be accomplished in our diverse society. One 
would say that this is compromise, but I would argue that this 
represents reality and the basis on which all progress is made. 
There is. then, a middle ground on which a college or 
university can integrate the ideal with the practical and 
achieve society's desired "educated person." Clifton R. 
Wharton Jr., president of Michigan State University, said it 
this way: 

General education, concentrating on developing a broad 
cultural perspective, analytic abilities, and com- 
municative skills, not only enriches our personal and in- 
tellectual lives, but enhances our adaptability to new 
situations, including new job situations. For that reason, 
I am by no means stretching a point when I say that 
general education is as indispensable to the world of 



work as any program of career education or vocational 
training. 

Therefore, I argue for the ascendancy of neither general 
nor career education. Only a dual approach can serve 
our purposes — a partnership operating with a context of 
ongoing educational participation by people of all ages, 
each involved in the kinds of learning experiences ap- 
propriate to whatever circumstances shape the various 
needs of his or her life. In our future educational 
strategies, general education and career education must 
join together, lest either, in standing alone, prove an un- 
fortunate societal liability. 

As national discussions on the future of liberal education 
have progressed, the justification for its continued existence is 
increasingly recognized. The difficulty lies in the means of 
converting philosophical goals into specifics. In resolving this 
problem, we must avoid the luxury of becoming embroiled in 
debates between the advocates of traditional humanistic 
education and those who opt for a heavier emphasis on 
applied learning, because there is neither one answer nor one 
method which would result in a universally applicable and 
acceptable solution. We need to agree that all of us are 
engaged in a common enterprise which proceeds from one 
broad set of goals that can be implemented in a variety of 
ways depending on the needs of the individuals and disciplines 
involved. It is, however, essential to avoid delays in order that 
we may turn to specific applications through which we can ad- 
vance the education of our students by translating the in- 
stitutional goals into an imaginative and contemporary 
program of learning and scholarship. 

There are several priorities which should be kept in 
mind. First is the need to improve the literacy of those 
students who arrive on campus deficient in reading and 
writing skills. Addressing this common problem will result in 
more productive students better able to grasp the essence of a 
liberal education. I have referred to this matter earlier and to 



FALL 1975 



11 



the ways in which the University is attempting to deal with it. 
A second priority evolves from the first. We must search for 
new unity in our Core education program. The Core program 
is that group or selection of courses which provides a 
background of breadth and understanding of various dis- 
ciplines and ensures that, regardless of one's major field of in- 
terest, he will be exposed to a variety of subjects. This must be 
accomplished not through a return to specific requirements, 
but through common goals and objectives which will be the 
link for our instruction and course offerings. Revisions 
should emphasize the interrelatedness of knowledge among 
various disciplines, as well as conceptual organization. It 
might involve a Department of General Studies in which 
faculty from various disciplines come together and offer 
courses stressing these interrelationships. It might also ex- 
plore new viewpoints and ideas for fresh approaches to the 
teaching of liberal education. The National Endowment for 
the Humanities has awarded Susquehanna funds to secure the 
services of an outside consultant to study Susquehanna's par- 
ticular needs in this regard. 

Another priority involves faculty development. Faculty 
will be encouraged to enter into more cross-disciplinary dis- 
cussions and projects with their colleagues here and 
elsewhere. Through this process, a real familiarity with 
changes in and new approaches to particular disciplines 
should evolve. Associated with the need for broader faculty 
participation and involvement in new curriculum design is the 
need for the teacher to become better qualified to advise 
students in designing their educational experience. As com- 
pulsory course requirements become fewer in number and as 
the student himself takes on more of the responsibility for 
designing his own educational program, the role of the ad- 
viser becomes even more crucial. An immediate aim is to im- 
prove our ability to utilize the present curricular offerings 
more creatively as each student's program is developed. 

Several new dimensions have been added to our 
educational program which allow students to gain more prac- 
tical experience through field work and to apply their 
knowledge to real life situations. This "extra dimension" is 
essential in helping to bridge the gap between the classroom 
and what exists in the real world. In cooperation with 
Tressler-Lutheran Service Associates, a large social service 
agency in Harrisburg, the University has formed the Center 
For Family Enrichment. The Center coordinates University 
involvement in the various social and economic issues facing a 
15-county region in Central Pennsylvania. Among its func- 
tions, the Center supervises student off-campus experiences 
with social service agencies, juvenile probation offices, homes 
for the elderly, the Federal Penitentiary in Lewisburg, local 
day care centers and nursery schools and other related in- 
ternships and practicums. The Center's outreach into the 
region is extensive and also includes a family counseling ser- 
vice and a program to assist rural ministers with their needs. 

In a similar vein, the Institute For Environmental 
Studies, now in its fourth year, provides our students with the 
opportunity to become involved in problems of the environ- 
ment. Students interested in environmental studies are 




provided with a series of courses whose purpose is not to train 
specialists, but to provide each student with a basis for un- 
derstanding, perceiving and appreciating the interre- 
lationships among environmental issues and particular dis- 
ciplines. During the junior and senior years each student 
selects a research course in his own discipline relating to en- 
vironmental issues. 

A new Rural Studies Program combines the resources of 
eight regional colleges and allows for the interchange of 
students among institutions so as to provide a breadth of 
coursework dealing with problems common to rural areas. In 
addition to Susquehanna, the sponsoring colleges are: 
Bloomsburg State College, Bucknell University, Lycoming 
College. Lock Haven State College. Mansfield State College. 
Pennsylvania State University, Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College. 

Cooperative Education is new to Susquehanna. This 
concept permits the student to alternate periods of full-time 
employment with full-time study and receive a bachelor's 
degree in five years. Providing flexibility for the student 
wishing practical work-related experience or who must rely 
on periods of employment to help meet college expenses, the 
Cooperative Program combines on-campus and off-campus 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



activity to provide greater access to education for more 
students. The University has received a Federal grant to for- 
mulate this program. 

The many other internships and off-campus experiences 
available through the individual academic departments con- 
tinue to be attractive to our students. One new dimension 
added this year is an arrangement with the Selinsgrove 
School District whereby junior education majors serve for a 
period of time as teacher aides in the local Middle School. 
These programs give practical application to learning and 
reinforce career interests. 

The quality of the Susquehanna faculty and their ac- 
complishments continues to reflect most favorably on the 
University. With the start of the 1975-76 academic year, we 
are pleased to welcome back those who were absent last year. 
Dr. Neil H. Potter, associate professor of chemistry, returns 
from a year's leave spent teaching at Tunghai University in 
Taiwan. Carol J. Harrison, assistant professor of 
mathematical sciences, returns from a full year's sabbatical, 
and Dr. Richard Kamber, assistant professor of philosophy 
and Dr. Lucia S. Kegler, associate professor of modern 
languages, return from absences during the third term. 

It was my pleasure to confirm the promotions of seven 
faculty members to higher rank during the past year in 
recognition of their outstanding service to the University. Ad- 
vancing from associate professor to full professor were Dr. 
Robert M. Bastress in education and Dr. James R. Misanin 
in psychology. Five staff members received promotion to 
associate professor: Donald W. Beckie, music; Frank S. 
Chase, sociology; Richard A. Reiland, accounting; Dr. 
Robert L. Tyler, mathematics; Dr. Gene R. Urey, political 
science. At the administrative level, James M. Skinner was 
elevated to associate director of admissions and Edward J. 
M alloy, formerly dean of students, now serves as vice presi- 
dent for student affairs. 

William O. Roberts, assistant professor of music, retired 
from the University on June 30. Professor Roberts returned 
to his alma mater in 1965 and has been the one primarily 
responsible for the excellent placement record of our 
graduates in music education. After his long and dis- 
tinguished career in public school service, it was Susquehan- 
na's good fortune to secure the services of Professor Roberts 
over the past ten years. Also retiring in June was Hilda Kar- 
niol, instructor in art. Mrs. Karniol, a resident of Sunbury, 
has served the University well since 1959 and her influence 
will remain through the numerous paintings she has 
periodically donated to Susquehanna and which are now on 
display throughout the campus. 

It is always pleasant to welcome new members of the 
academic community to Susquehanna. Joel Behrens will 
replace Mr. Roberts in the Music Department. He will 
assume the rank of instructor in music and supervisor of the 
student teaching program in music. He is a specialist in 
woodwinds and holds a master's degree in music from the 
University of Michigan. William G. Krieger, presently com- 
pleting work on his doctorate at Purdue University, will serve 
as an instructor in psychology while Dr. Leroy H. Pelton of 



the department is on leave. To accommodate the increase in 
enrollment in business, we have added Richard J. Masom to 
our staff as an assistant professor. Mr. Masom has extensive 
experience in business and holds an engineering degree from 
Rutgers University. At the same time, Mrs. Dorothy Masom 
will replace Mrs. Karniol as a lecturer in art. Mark D. Soskin, 
the holder of a master's degree from California State Univer- 
sity in Sacramento who is presently finishing his doctorate at 
Penn State, will join Susquehanna as an instructor in 
economics. 

James T. Parks has been appointed as director of the 
Center For Family Enrichment. A Susquehanna graduate 
and an ordained Lutheran minister, he will also serve as a lec- 
turer in sociology. For the past several years, Mr. Parks has 
been associated with the Davis and Elkins College guidance 
and counseling center in Elkins, West Virginia. Mrs. Nora S. 
Williams, a graduate of the University, has joined the ad- 
missions staff replacing Wendy McMahan, who, along with 
Mrs. Susan P. Staggers, another member of the staff, have 
moved to Franklin and Marshall College. Replacing Mrs. 
Staggers is William C. Heyman, a graduate of Gettysburg 
College and more recently a member of the admissions staff 
at the University of Detroit. 

Several members of the faculty were granted sabbatical 
leaves for the current year. Dr. David E. Horlacher, professor 
of economics, is working for the United Nations on popula- 
tion control in the Far East, while Richard A. Reiland, asso- 
ciate professor of accounting, will study and teach for a year 
at Bowling Green University in Ohio. Dr. Peter B. Waldeck, 
associate professor of German, will be on leave during the 
third term to continue his work on a book. In addition, David 
J. Oscarson, assistant professor of business, will continue his 
administrative leave to pursue his doctorate at Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. 

Over 50 percent of the University's faculty have earned 
doctorates. This year four additional members received 
Ph.D.s: Hans E. Feldmann, assistant professor of English, 
from the University of Maryland; G. Edward Schweikert. 
assistant professor of psychology, from Kent State Universi- 
ty; Gene R. Urey, associate professor of political science, 
from Syracuse University; James A. Blessing, assistant 
professor of political science, from SUNY at Albany. 

Various members of the faculty were active in scholarly 
activities. Dr. Kamber presented a paper entitled "The Asser- 
tions of Authors in Philosophy and Literature" for the joint 
Susquehanna-Bucknell Humanities Colloquium. Dr. 
Thomas F. Livernois gave two lectures, one on "The 
Theology of Proclamation" at the meeting of Bloomsburg 
District of the Synod, and a second entitled "Lutheran 
Theology" before a meeting of Christian educators from a 
Harrisburg congregation. Dr. Donald D. Housley addressed 
the Snyder County Historical Society on "Economic 
Development and Population Change in Snyder County, 
1800-1970." Dr. Charles E. Lyle presented two guest lectures 
on parapsychology at Bloomsburg State College and Zion 
Lutheran Church in Sunbury. 

In the Language and Literature Division, Dr. Elizabeth 



FALL 1975 



13 



Wiley, professor of English, read a paper entitled "Dickens' 
Italy Revisited" before the Dickens Fellowship in Pittsburgh. 
Dr. Waldeck delivered a paper on "Anxiety and the Biology 
of Literature" at the Humanities Colloquium. 

The Music Department was active in the presentation of 
recitals and in the area of conducting. James B. Steffy, head 
of the Department, was guest conductor for the Virginia 
Regional Band Festival, the Franklin County Band and the 
Perry County Band, and was festival director for the Fiesta 
Musical Mexicana in Mexico City and Oaxtepec. He con- 
ducted the Susquehanna Symphonic Band in a concert before 
the Eastern Division of the Music Educators National 
Conference in Philadelphia, and also served as adjudicator 
for band festivals in Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. Vic- 
tor P. Rislow conducted the Susquehanna University Jazz 
Ensemble in several presentations in Pennsylvania high 
schools. He and Donald W. Beckie are members of the music 
faculty of the Governor's School for the Arts hosted by 
Bucknell University during the summer. Cyril M. Stretansky 
again served as festival director and guest conductor for the 
Rome Choral Festival held during Easter week. This summer 
he also served as instructor for a Church Music Seminar in 
Choral Conducting at College Misericordia in Wilkes-Barre. 
John D. Zurfluh Jr. was clinician for string instrument repair 
sessions sponsored by the Texas American String Teacher 
Association at Austin College. Several members of the music 
faculty gave recitals on the campus — Galen H. Deibler, 
Harriet M. Couch, Dr. James L. Boeringer and John P. 
Magnus. In addition, Messrs. Deibler and Zurfluh. David A. 
Boltz, and Mrs. Grace Boeringer presented several programs 
with Mr. Beckie as guest artist. The University was host to a 
Workshop on Church Music directed by Dr. Boeringer 
during the summer. Mrs. Joan Moyer again served as direc- 
tor of the second Dance Workshop conducted on campus. 
During the academic year, John E. Fries organized a Piano 
Laboratory Workshop conducted by the Baldwin Company. 
Finally, the University served as host to the Central District 
High School Festival. Messrs. Boltz and Zurfluh were con- 
ductors and organizers of the festival. 

Dr. Richard H. Lowright presented an abstract and 
paper entitled "Climatic Cause of Variation in Hydraulic 
Equivalence" at the annual meeting of the Geological Society 
of America, Northwestern Section. Dr. Wallace J. Growney 
was invited to present a lecture entitled "Computer 
U nderwear" to the Philadelphia Section of the Mathematical 
Association of America. Dr. Gynith C. Giffin presented a 
paper entitled "Relevant Nuclear Power" to the Penn- 
sylvania Association of College Chemistry Teachers at the 
University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Edwin M. Van Dam gave a 
paper with the title "Tungsten Atom Synthesis Methods" at 
the Chemical Institute of Canada in Toronto. 

Members of the Social Science Division published a 
number of items. Boyd Gibson submitted a review, Maguire, 
Daniel C, Death By Choice, to The Christian Century 
magazine. He prepared an additional review of Crosby, Illu- 
sion and Disillusion. Dr. Livernois published an article en- 
titled "New Foundations for Theological Reflection on The 



Problem of Revolutionary Violence" which appeared in the 
1975 issue of Susquehanna University Studies. He also 
abstracted foreign articles for the Journal of Ecumenical 
Studies. Dr. Charles J. Igoe prepared and distributed a 
Cooperating Teachers Manual, while Dr. Bastress prepared 
in final form A Self-Instructional Manual for Instructional 
Planning. Dr. Housley serves as general editor of the Snyder 
County Bicentennial History. Dr. Pelton published a book 
entitled The Psychology of\on- Violence. In addition, he co- 
authored a research article entitled "The Economics of 
Teaching," which was published in the March issue of 
Change. He has submitted a manuscript with the title "A 
Perspective on Violence" to the Journal for the Theory of 
Social Behavior. Dr. Schweikert published two papers: 
Misanin, J.R., Chubb, L.D., Quinn, S.A., and Schweikert, 
G.E., "An Apparatus and Procedure for the Effective 
Instrumental Training of Neonatal and Infant Rats," 
Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, and Wilson, Vardaris. 
and Schweikert, G.E., Entitled "A Technique for Cannula 
Implantation in the Decorticate Preparation." which 
appeared in Physiology and Behavior. Dr. Misanin co- 
authored two papers: Campbell, B.A., Misanin. J.R., White. 
B.C., and Lytle, L.D., "Species Differences in Ontogeny of 
Memory: Indirect Support for Neural Maturation as a 
Determinant of Forgetting." Journal of Comparative and 
Physiological Psychology; Misanin, J.R., Hardy, S., and 
Goodyear, J., "Effects of Shock Intensity on Speed and 
Response Competition in the Escape Training of Neonatal 
and Infant Rats," Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society. 

Members of the Language and Literature Division list 
publications also. Dr. Lawrence A. Abler completed a paper 
on Rilke to be included in a Bucknell University Press volume 
entitled The Binding of Proteus. He has also completed a 
manuscript on the translation of Kleist's "Der zerbrochene 
Krug" for submission to a publisher for evaluation. Dr. Mar- 
jorie W. McCune continues to abstract articles for / 7th Cen- 
tury News. She is co-editor of the 1974 Humanities Collo- 
quium volume to be published by Bucknell University Press. 
She also published an article entitled "The Tomb as Image: 
The Stones of Browning and Ruskin" in the 197 5 Susquehan- 
na University Studies. Ronald L. Dotterer is co-editor of the 
1975 Humanities Colloquium volume to be published by the 
Bucknell University Press. Dr. Robert G. Mowry's doctoral 
dissertation was published in the April 1975 issue of the 
Bulletin of the Spanish Royal Academy of History. He con- 
tinues to work on the revision of Spanish: Listening. 
Speaking. Reading, Writing. Dr. Jane F. Barlow published 
an article entitled "Review of Book XV of Tacitus" which 
appeared in The Classical World in March 1975. 

In the Science Division, Dr. Growney reviewed a paper 
for the Pi Mu Epsilon Journal. Bruce S. Wagenseller com- 
piled a booklet entitled "Exercise Journal" published by Blue 
Shield of Pennsylvania. 

In the Business Division, Raymond G. Laverdiere 
published two articles. "Information Systems and 
Management," and "Cash Management." Both articles were 
published in Managerial Planning. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



development 
/finances 



THE EXTRAORDINARY AMOUNT oftimewhich facul- 
ty and staff devote to this University's future planning gives 
some evidence of the conviction present on campus that Sus- 
quehanna is fulfilling a vital role in higher education. This 
dedication to purpose is carried forward and exhibited by the 
various committees of the Board of Directors who meet as 
often as monthly on University-related matters. Such broad 
based leadership gives us all confidence in the future. Of 
course, the role of many hundreds of alumni cannot be 
overstated. Their involvement in campus affairs, alumni 
meetings and fund raising programs all attest to the growing 
constituency which is Susquehanna. 

With this confidence, we are all agreed that Susquehan- 
na University can meet its future commitment. Further 
testimony is the successful $2 million capital campaign com- 
pleted in 1972 which received unprecedented support from 
alumni and friends. Since that time, we have been 



strengthening our annual giving program, the Susquehanna 
University Fund, which last year exceeded its goal of $175,- 
000. Between 25 and 30 percent of our alumni make annual 
donations to the University. Overall, Susquehanna again 
raised more than $800,000 in total gifts and grants for the 
year ending June 30. 1975. On the following pages, we express 
our sincere appreciation listing the names of all those who 
have given to the various fund raising programs during this 
past year. This support is the lifeblood of our University! 

Much remains to be done. A new and more challenging 
development program awaits approval by the Board of Direc- 
tors at its semi-annual meeting in October. As this program 
unfolds, one will note a transition from an emphasis on 
buildings and facilities to the more intangible areas of 
program development, faculty salaries and scholarship aid. 
These latter needs are to be satisfied through an intensified ef- 
fort to raise funds for endowment. Historically, Susquehan- 
na's endowment has lagged behind many other colleges in the 
region. A modest fund of just under $2 million constitutes our 
total endowment resources. Over the next several years we 
hope to add $2.5 million to endowment. This will provide an- 
nual income for improvements in faculty salaries, scholarship 
aid, and funds for new and vital program development. 

Another major goal of the development program will be 
to provide funds for the new physical education building. 
While construction began this summer and the structure is to 



The changing landscape as seen from Hassinger Hall during the early days 
of excavation for Susquehanna's new physical education center. Alumni Gymnasium 
was built 40 years ago and the north extension (nearest the viewer) was added 
in 1962. An extension to the south was added after the 1964 GA fire. 




wm ■■■ 




FALL 1975 



15 



be completed by September 15, 1976, the University ar- 
ranged initial financing so that this much needed project 
would not bedelayed any longer. A major portion of the cam- 
paign will be devoted to raising funds for repaying the cost of 
this facility. On June 24 bids for this new 42,000 square foot 
structure were opened and the Spera Construction Company 
of Harrisburg was awarded the contract on a low bid of just 
over $2 million. In addition to this new structure to be at- 
tached to the existing Alumni Gymnasium, the present 
building will receive a complete renovation. While Alumni 
Gymnasium served the University well, it became apparent 
during the growth years of the 1960s that it was inadequate 
for present needs. For a number of years we have been forced 
to play intercollegiate basketball games at the Selinsgrove 
High School. Yet, this facility has been put off until last due 
to our feeling that certain academic and special-use buildings 
had higher priority on our list of needs. We are all delighted 
that circumstances now permit us to move forward. 

Designed to augment our educational program, the 
building is essentially structured to facilitate the recreational 
needs of students, with secondary emphasis given to inter- 
collegiate sports. The new section will contain a main gym- 
nasium with seating for 1700, a modern swimming pool with 
spectator space for 600, new and complete offices, locker 
rooms, special-use and auxiliary areas for the instruction of 
lifelong sports, and classroom facilities. It will provide the 
campus with a final major facility needed to round out our 
educational program and expand to 1 1 the list of major 
buildings either erected or renovated since 1959. The value of 
Susquehanna's assets, with the completion of this building, 
will approach $30 million. 

Several other important physical needs of a much less 
costly nature are included in the forthcoming development 
program. Both are necessary for the well-being of the Univer- 
sity. Hassinger Hall is in need of major renovations and, to a 
somewhat lesser extent, so is Seibert Hall. These are the two 
oldest dormitories and both have withstood many years of 
use. Over the next several years, we will need to address 
ourselves to these two matters. 

Fven with this need to further renovate buildings, the 
major thrust of our efforts in development over the years im- 
mediately ahead will rest with a commitment to strengthen 
the academic program. In all, we shall need to raise about 
$6.5 million over the next four to five years. 

While past experience would indicate that the total 
package of needs described can be met, it is important to 
place priority on certain "urgent" needs to be satisfied during 
the short term — two to three years. As a result, the Board of 
Directors is now considering a plan for action: A Phase I Plan 
to satisfy the most urgent of these needs — about $2 or $2.5 
million to be raised as part of an intensive capital campaign 
among our alumni and friends during 1976 and 1977. The 
goal would include approximately $1 million for the physical 
education building and $1.5 million for endow- 
ment — scholarships, faculty salaries and program develop- 
ment. While the Phase I effort is underway, plans will be 
directed toward satisfying the remaining goals. 



During these crucial times, Susquehanna has been for- 
tunate in being able to maintain a balanced budget. Our $6 
million operating budget grows about 7 percent annually. We 
believe that prudent management is the key, and we have 
taken pride in our ability to reduce non-educational expen- 
ditures without affecting the academic program. In fact, we 
believe that we have been able to add strength to many of our 
offerings. In part, this is due to the generosity of alumni and 
friends and to Susquehanna's ability to attract ample 
numbers of qualified students. 

In addition to gifts and grants from alumni and friends, 
the University's financial stability is further enhanced by the 
continued interest and support of the Lutheran Church. The 
Central Pennsylvania Synod budgeted almost $140,000 for 
the University again during this past year and, coupled with a 
new program of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania which 
provides direct grants for private higher education, the 
University was able to increase its operating income by about 
$250,000. These two sources of funds helped significantly to 
reduce the need for further increases in student costs during 
this past year when the rate of inflation exceeded 1 2 percent. 

You can note from these reports that the campus has 
changed markedly during the last several years. Another 
significant addition was the completion of a Science Research 
facility in the fall of 1974. It was funded by the University and 
the National Science Foundation. Susquehanna is now able 
to provide its science students with opportunities to perform 
independent study and research in modern and spacious 
quarters. I might add that this emphasis on student research 
has been recognized by outsiders as a major strength of the 
University. During the past year we have also expanded and 
improved the offices of a number of our faculty. As student 
advising and personal consultation increase in importance, 
the University finds that there is greater need for more ade- 
quate office space. The Religion and Philosophy and 
Sociology departments have been relocated to more suitable 
quarters, and the English Department offices in the Cottage 
on University Avenue have been modernized. Of necessity the 
Development Division — Alumni, University Relations and 
Development offices — have vacated the basement of 
Hassinger Hall and been relocated in Selinsgrove Hall. This 
opened additional housing for men. 



Susquehanna's Environmental Research 

Center is in full operation, with the 

community weather facility moved from the 

Penn Valley Airport, wet suits and 

water-analysis instruments in regular use. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




FALL 1975 



17 



UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 

(Alumni and friends contributing $100 or more to 

The Susquehanna University Fund 

during the period July 1, 1974 through June 30, 1975) 



Mrs. Claude Aikens 
C Thomas Aikens 
Dr. & Mrs. Myrl E. Alexander hc'72 
Dorothy M. Anderson '62 
Dr. 8 Mrs. John A. Apple hc'64 
Mr & Mrs. John B. Apple 
Mr S Mrs Douglas E. Arthur 49 
Gilbert C '61 8 Lynn Hassinger Askew '57 
Arch A '20 & Katharine Held! Aucker '44 
William P. "39 & Hester Bittinger Ayers '40 
Dr. 8 Mrs. Nelson E. Bailey '57 
Mr. 8 Mrs Alvin T Barber '31 
Dr & Mrs Robert M. Bastress '39 
Mr a Mrs Paul W Beardslee 
Dr. & Mrs Robert B. Bechtel '62 
W. Leonard Becker 
Mr. & Mrs. William G. Becker 
Norman R. Benner '25 
Mr S Mrs Oren N Benner '37 
Mr 8 Mrs Joseph H Bernegger 
Dr 8 Mrs Earl L Bernstine '50 
Mr. & Mrs. Jack K. Bishop '57 
Paul M. Bishop '30 
John W. Bittinger '23 
Mr. 8 Mrs H. Vernon Blough '31 
Margaret Widlund Blough '24 
Dr. 8 Mrs Roger M Blough '25 
Herbert G. Boettger Jr. '66 
Mr. & Mrs Marsh C Bogar '51 
Mr 8 Mrs George C. Boone h'69 
Mr & Mrs Arthur F Bowen '65 
Dr. & Mrs. Charles R Bowen '62 
Lee E '26 and Laura Henninger Boyer '25 
Grace C Boyle '33 
Robert F. 8 Hazel Brobst Brown '51 
Mr 8 Mrs Reginald Brooks 
Paul B '50 8 Virginia Blough Buehler '50 
Dr 8 Mrs. Edgar S. Brown Jr 
William R Burchfield (Deceased) 
Dr & Mrs Leonard F. Bush hc'70 
Harry W. '48 8 Virginia Doss Butts '48 
Mr, & Mrs Russell N Carmichael '34 
Dr & Mrs Alvin W. Carpenter "24 
Charles H '52 8 Voylet Dietz Carr '52 
Dr 8 Mrs. Henry H. Cassler '34 
Irving L 8 Carol Dauberman Chidsey 56 
Jack E Cisney '59 

The Rev & Mrs Edwin M. Clapper '34 
Samuel D Clapper 68 
Harry L Clark Jr. '59 

James R '46 S Mary Jane Rudy Clark x'44 
Dr. 8 Mrs Bryce C Cochran 
Mr 8 Mrs George A Cooper '48 
Edith Frankentield Cramer '34 
Esther Cressman '20 

William C 53 & Margaret Henderson Daven- 
port '60 
Mary Heim Davey '38 
John E 8 Frances Thomas Davis '30 
Thomas J 8 Martha Laudenslager Davis '31 
Mr & Mrs Charles B Degenstein 
Dr & Mrs Howard W DeMott h'54 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Milton C. Dumeyer 
William N. Duck '11 

Dr Marlm M '25 8 Elsie Nace Enders '27 
Dr. 8 Mrs Roland A Erickson hc'70 
Mr 8 Mrs Samuel H. Evert 
Mr & Mrs. Burdell S Faust '58 
J Frank Faust '15 
Mr. & Mrs William O. Faylor Sr. 
H R Fenstermacher '32 
Marlyn R. '23 8 Mabel Kmzey Fetterolf '24 
Mr & Mrs Paul G Filipek '65 
Robert L '59 & Linda Traub Fiscus '61 
Dr 8 Mrs Lawrence C Fisher '31 
Dr 8 Mrs. Shelton Fisher hc'68 
Dr. & Mrs Kenneth O Fladmark h'68 
Ruth A Flanders 68 
A.N. a Ida Olmstead Frederickson '21 
Dr & Mrs. Walter B. Freed 
Dr 8 Mrs William H. Gehron Jr. '40 
Dr & Mrs Ralph C Geigle '35 
Laird S Gemberling, Esq '33 
Laura L Gemberling '28 
Dr & Mrs Euell T. Gibbons hc'72 
The Rev & Mrs. Boyd Gibson 
Gynith C Giffin h'68 
Joyce K. Gilbert '54 
Dr 8 Mrs Russell W Gilbert h'37 
Mr 8 Mrs Robert C Goetze 
Wallace E Gordon '54 



James J. '55 & Elsie Gruber Gormley '56 

Dr & Mrs Donald M. Gray '60 

George W 8 Margaret Brubaker Gray '59 

Ira C Gross '15 

Delsey Morris Gross '27 

Fred A. Grosse h'67 

Dr. & Mrs. Wallace J Growney 

Mr. 8 Mrs. Robert G. Gundaker '64 

Dr. & Mrs. Melvin E. Haas '42 

Dr & Mrs. Harry H. Haddon hc'63 

Mr & Mrs Paul M. Haines '31 

Arnold C. & Mary Jane Jessen Hansen '49 

Harold E. 8 Jeanne Attinger Hassinger '75 

Zelda F Haus '27 

Mr & Mrs James Hazlett '52 

H. Lee '48 & Edith Wagner Hebel '49 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert A Heinbach 

John S. Hendricks 57 

Phoebe Herman '17 

Robert L Herr '39 

George W Herrold '25 

James M '28 & Twila Crebs Herrold '30 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Hess 

George H Heverlmg Jr 

Ray G '47 & Dorothy Dellecker Hochstuhl '43 

Mary Farlling Hollway '28 

Dr & Mrs David E Horlacher 

Orlando W Houts 

D Edgar '34 & Aberdeen Phillips Hutchison 

'34 
Lawrence M '43 & Louise Kresge Isaacs '45 
Emily McElwee Jamison '27 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert B Jarvis '53 
John H. & Jane Hutchison Kaempfer '41 
William H Kahl '62 
David S. Kammerer '16 
Mr & Mrs Frank Karniol 
Dr. S Mrs. Lester J. Karschner '37 
Henry J. '39 & Betty Johnston Keil '38 
Mr & Mrs Robert P. Kemble '29 
Dr 8 Mrs. John F. Kmdsvatter '32 
Harry L & Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel '28 
Earl F. '57 8 Mary Bingaman Kleintop '55 
Ruth Bergstresser Koch '34 
R. Lynn & Rose Ann Gumbert Krape '29 
George H. x'31 & Hannah Pitner Lambert '28 
Eleanor Robison Landes h'60 
Mr & Mrs. William L.S. Landes III '71 
W Frank '39 8 Isabel Tewkesbury 

Laudenslager '39 
Mr 8 Mrs. Herbert C. Lauver "38 
Raymond C. '50 & Kay LaRue Lauver x'52 
Ellis K Lecrone '21 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Leib 
William J. 8 Alice Ann Patterson Leidel '58 
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Lewis '27 
George C. '54 8 Lorraine Rarick Liddington 

'52 
Richard W '48 & Gertrude Roberts 

Lindemann '48 
Dr. & Mrs. Ralph W. Loew hc'72 
Alma L. Long '22 
Bessie C. Long "22 
Paul B Lucas "28 

Mr 8 Mrs Elwood M. McAllister '49 
Alma V McCollough '24 
John C II '37 8 Marjone Wolfe McCune '43 
Dr 8 Mrs. Thomas F. McGrath h'69 
Robert M 8 Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan 

'62 
Mr. & Mrs. George O Machlan 
Mr & Mrs. Edward J Malloy 
Nevm 8 Florence Rothermel Latsha "40 
Everett M '50 8 Jeanne Kohler Manning '50 
Eugene H 8 Martha Larson Martin '26 
Mr 8 Mrs Stephen J. Martinec '35 
James R '60 & Jean Ewald Middleswarth '62 
Jack A 8 Rebecca Shade Mignot '54 
Dr. 8 Mrs. Wayne E. Miller '55 
Wayne W Miller, Esq. '65 
Mr 8 Mrs Duane Mitchell '54 
Mary Weimer Moffitt '28 
Gary L. 8 Stephanie Haase Moore '60 
Charles A. Morns '49 
William S. Morrow. Esq. "34 
B H 8 Pauline Crow Mount '34 
Mr 8 Mrs Beniamin T Moyer '28 
Mr & Mrs Carl M Moyer '63 
Mr 8 Mrs Robert Muirhead 
Edith E. Musser 
Mr & Mrs Myer R Musser Sr. '30 



T Ernest & Mary Jarrett Newland '38 

William L. Nicholls '25 

Ruth Goff Nicodemus '30 

Gilbert F 8 Mina Sarba Norwood '50 

Peter M '57 8 Ruth Scott Nunn '55 

Paul D. Ochenrider '39 

Arthur J Oriel x'67 

Mr. & Mrs. Lynn E Persing '67 

Dr. 8 Mrs. Vernon R. Phillips '38 

Dorothy B. Porter hc'71 

Mr 8 Mrs Douglas A Portzline '41 

John P. x'41 & Mathilda Neudoerffer Powell 

'39 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Robert L. Pruitt 
Rebecca C. Puffenberger '29 
John H. Raab '62 
Nancy Davis Raab '61 
Mr. a Mrs. Joseph L. Ray h'67 
Mr. 8 Mrs. John S. Redpath 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Robert U. Redpath Jr. 
Mr 8 Mrs. Richard A. Reiland 
Dr 8 Mrs. Otto Reimherr h'67 
Beatrice Rettinger '23 
Harold H. Reuning 

Simon B '30 8 Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads x'34 
Harry M Rice '26 

Sidney F '59 8 Sandra Brandt Richard x'61 
Mr. a Mrs. Kermit R. Ritter '60 
Edward S '42 8 Blanche Forney Rogers '42 
Helen O Rogers '39 
Jack 8 Harriet Leese Rosenquist '32 
Samuel D. '54 8 Dorothy Apgar Ross '53 
Dr. 8 Mrs Bryan C. Rothfuss '23 
Dr 8 Mrs. Henry W Rozenberg hc'73 
William R. '49 a Bessie Bathgate Ruhl '48 
James O. Rumbaugh Jr. '50 
G Oliver Sands "25 
Mr 8 Mrs Louis F. Santangelo '50 
Mr 8 Mrs Richard A. Scharfe '31 
John A. a Irene Etter Schmehl '63 
M Jane Schnure '39 

Nevm C.T. '49 8 Sarah Wormley Shaffer x'41 
Mr. a Mrs. Paul C Shatto Jr. '41 
Mr 8 Mrs. Paul C. Shatto Sr. 
Mr. S Mrs. Charles J. Shearer '31 
Ray G Sheeler '28 
Dr 8 Mrs. Erie I. Shobert II '35 
Mr 8 Mrs. Carl G. Smith '28 
Robert A. Smith '62 
Ruth Buffington Smith '49 
George Wellington 8 Lucy Herr Smith '26 
Helen Ott Soper '28 



ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS 



AnnaC. Barley 

Dr. 8 Mrs George W Harrison 



1894 

* "Estate of Chalmers E Frontz 

1907 

D Franklin Fisher 

1908 

Ralph W- Showers 

1909 

"Grace A Geiselman 
•John W Thompson 

1910 

Roy A DeLong 

1911 

•William N. Duck 

1913 

" Mane Geiselman Gabnelson 
Sarah B Manhart 

1914 

Mary Ressler Dale 
'Mary G. Steele 

1915 

*J Frank Faust 

*lra C Gross 
Emma Moyer Masteller 
Susan Geise Shannon 
Alice F. Weaver 
Catherine A. Weaver 
Gertrude F Weaver 



George A '29 8 Gertrude ArbogastSpaid 29 

Mr. 8 Mrs Jacob M Spangler Jr. '52 

Carl H 8 Ruth Richter Specht '41 

John H. '62 8 Linda Leach Spillman '63 

Helen Wentzel Spitzner '37 

Mr. 8 Mrs Amos Alonzo Stagg Jr h'50 

Walter L Startzel '68 

Ann L. Stauffenberg '68 

Mr 8 Mrs J Donald Steele. Esq. '33 

Mary G Steele '14 

Roger 8 Shirley Finkbeiner Stehlin '39 

John R '52 8 Lois Gordon Steiger '51 

Richard L. Steinberg '68 

Ivars 8 Nora Galins Stemhards '54 

Catherine E Steltz h'68 

L. Naomi Steward 

Mr 8 Mrs W Alfred Streamer '26 

James W '64 8 Barbara Evans Summers '65 

Mr. a Mrs. George R. F. Tamke h'67 

Dr 8 Mrs. John W. Thompson 09 

John A. 8 Mary Barnes Topper '37 

George W '22 8 Bertha Stammler Townsend 

h'34 
S Prentiss Turnbach 
Dorothy Turner "36 
Dr 8 Mrs. Robert A. Updegrove '41 
Mr 8 Mrs. Ellis William Van Horn Jr. 
Dennis L. '68 8 Margaret Orth Van Name '66 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Bruce S. Wagenseller h'71 
Patricia A. Walker '57 
Mr. & Mrs. John V. Walsh '43 
Mr, 8 Mrs Norman E. Walz h'67 
Mr. 8 Mrs Alan R Warehime 
Dr a Mrs. Howard H. Weaner Jr 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Luther M Weaver Jr. '26 
Dr. 8 Mrs. Arthur C. Webber "34 
Dr 8 Mrs Gustave W Weber h'64 
Mr. 8 Mrs Robert F. Weis 
Dr. 8 Mrs. Carl A. Weller '51 
Mr. 8 Mrs. John B. Welsh 
Helen Salem Wescoat '19 
James W. '58 8 Gait Woolbert White "58 
Mr. 8 Mrs. H.W. Wieder Jr. 
Mr. a Mrs. Wallace C. Wilson 
Donald A. '60 8 Patricia Bodle Winey '60 
Mr. 8 Mrs. Robert E. Winter '48 
Dr 8 Mrs Eugene Witiak '59 
Mr. S Mrs. Harry S. Wright 
Mr, 8 Mrs. Robert K. Wyatt 
Nancy E Youhon '52 
Shirley A. Young '51 



1916 

"David S Kammerer 
Bess Fetterolf Keller 

1917 

'Phoebe Herman 
P Kepner Jarrett 
Ira C. Mummert 
Elizabeth Hall Neideigh 
Marion Moyer Potteiger 
Paul D. Stees 
Samuel M Stouffer 

1918 

ReldaRobb Hamilton 
Lulu Fetterolf Harman 
Eva P Herman 
Katharine Persmg 
Helen Fetterolf Riden 

1919 

WillardD Ailbeck 
Hulda Stemmger Bowser 
Charlotte Weaver Cassler 
Harry J Crouse 
Dorothy Allison Stone 
"Helen Salem Wescoat 

1920 

"Arch A. Aucker 

Evelyn Allison Boeder 

Ernest B Cassler 
"Esther Cressman 

Susan Reanck Shannon 

1921 

"Mabel Steffen Brosctous 

Mr and Mrs Marshall Diehl 
"Ida Olmstead Fredrickson 
Raymond F Getty 
Yvonne Everest Harmon 
Mane Romig Huntington 



'Ellis K Lecrone 
Ruth Welker Schwartz 
Harry E Swanger 

1922 

'Alma L. Long 
'Bessie C. Long 

Frank L- Mitchell 
'George W Townsend 

1923 

ReideE.Bingaman 
•John W Biltinger 

John I. & Stella Risser Cole 
"Marlyn R. Fetterolf 

Mary Beck Grant 
'Beatrice Rettinger 
'Bryan C Rothfuss 

Thomas H Stetler 

Thomas J. Weible 

1924 

Minam Rearick Bingaman 
'Margaret Widlund Blough 
••Alvin W- Carpenter 

W. John Derr 

Harold S. Duppstadt 
"Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf 

Cornelius S Jarrett 

Raymond W. Klinedinst 
•Alma V. McCollough 

Rachel Brubaker Whited 

1925 

HarleyH Barnes 
'Norman R. Benner 
"Dr & Mrs. Roger. M. Blought 

William C. Bowser 
'Laura Henninger Boyer 

Dorothy Clarke Creager 
'Marlin M. Enders 

C Ralph Gramley 

Martin L. Grossman 
'George W Herrold 

Hazel L Herrold 

Frona Krebs Hummer 

Alda L Long 
•William L. Nicholls 

W. Earl Thomas 

Jacob F. Wetzel 

Christie E. Zimmerman 

1926 

Floyd L.Adams 
*Lee E. Boyer 

Theodore E. Ebberts Sr. 

Hayes C. Gordon 

Margaret Morning Haiston 
"Martha Larson Marlin 

Anna M. Norwat 

Mary Reigler Oyler 
"Harry M. Rice 

Austin C Roche 
*G. Oliver Sands 

Bruce R. Shaffer 

"Lucy Herr Smith 

"W Alfred Streamer 

Oliver S. Swisher 

Ethel V Taylor 

Parke R. Wagner 
'Luther M Weaver Jr. 

1927 

Mary E. Bowersox 
'Elsie Nace Enders 
'Delsey Morris Gross 

Laura Arnold Hart 
"Zelda F. Haus 
"Emily McElwee Jamison 

Anna Brosious Klinedinst 

Grace Beckley Kramer 
'John F Lewis 

Wendell H. Phillips 

Myles R. Smeltz 

Roland M Swartzwelder 

M. Thelma Taylor 

Elizabeth Whiffen Vought 

Clinton Weisenfluh 

Bert E- Wynn 

1928 

Joyce Bousum Burton 
Margaret H Buyers 
Theodore Cameron 
Kenneth M. Cassell 
Vesta Stemmger Cook 
Betty Stong Eichelberger 
Elizabeth M. Fisher 
Ruth Folkmann 
•Laura L. Gemberling 



Dorothy Goff 

Harry F. Haney 
•James M Herrold 
"Mary Farlling Hollway 

Heber H Hummel 

Jerome B S. Kaufman 
'Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel 
"Hannah Pitner Lambertt 

Geneva Nace Lambie 

Lillian Fisher Long 
"Paul B Lucas 

Ruth Moody McGarrah 
'Mary Weimer Moffitt 
•Benjamin T Moyer 

Marvin W Schlegel 
•Ray G Sheeler 
•Helen Ott Soper 

Sara Seal Stauffer 

M